full time – Work From Homee http://work-fromhomee.com/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 10:12:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://work-fromhomee.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png full time – Work From Homee http://work-fromhomee.com/ 32 32 Microsoft discovers that 50% of bosses want to end telework https://work-fromhomee.com/microsoft-discovers-that-50-of-bosses-want-to-end-telework/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 18:14:34 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/microsoft-discovers-that-50-of-bosses-want-to-end-telework/ According to Microsoft’s second annual Work Trends Index report, half of world leaders expect a full-scale return to the office in the near future, despite employees’ growing desire to work flexibly. The survey, which compiles feedback from 31,000 people in 31 countries and also takes into account data from Microsoft 365 and LinkedIn users, finds […]]]>

According to Microsoft’s second annual Work Trends Index report, half of world leaders expect a full-scale return to the office in the near future, despite employees’ growing desire to work flexibly.

The survey, which compiles feedback from 31,000 people in 31 countries and also takes into account data from Microsoft 365 and LinkedIn users, finds that as hybrid working becomes mainstream, growing numbers of workers prioritize their well-being.

As employee/employer power dynamics continue to shift, these findings suggest that if business leaders do not quickly adopt flexible solutions, they risk losing their best talent.

Half of leaders plan a full return to the office

After two years of Disruption induced by COVID-19, hybrid working finally seems to be the new normal for many. But before workers get used to switching between home and office, a new Microsoft survey suggests that many employers have other plans.

The Trend Index Report, published on Wednesday, concluded that 50% of business leaders are already demanding, or will soon demand, that their employees return to the office full-time by the end of this year. The percentage was even higher in the manufacturing (55%), retail (54%) and consumer goods (53%) sectors.

43% of leaders say building relationships is the biggest challenge in remote and hybrid working

While the motivations behind these numbers vary, more than half of leaders believe productivity levels have been impacted by remoteness from the office, while 43% cited building relationships as the biggest issue associated with work. hybrid and remote.

While employers stress the importance of physical presence, managers seem less certain, with 54% admitting their current leadership is out of touch with employee expectations. However, with three-quarters of them feeling like they lack the influence to implement meaningful changes in their team, their concerns are unlikely to be enough to swing the pendulum.

Workers seek a healthier work-life balance

The past year has exposed countless employees to the concept of flexible working, from adjusting office hours to working remotely.

As these practices grow in popularity, people’s attitudes towards their professional lives are changing, with Microsoft’s report revealing that 47% of respondents now put their home and personal lives ahead of their work.

But the priorities don’t end with employees’ families, with the survey also revealing that 53% of respondents are now more likely to prioritize their own health and wellbeing at work.

“By not commuting, I have more time to spend with my family and more time for everyday things like cooking a meal and eating together.” – Employee working in professional services, United States

If you run a business or manage teams, these results shouldn’t surprise you. The survey results indicate a growing preference for flexible working, which has been increasing for years. And with even higher favor rates among millennials and Gen Z, it doesn’t look like traditional practices will return to the workplace anytime soon.

Employers should take return-to-work concerns seriously

It’s undeniable that most business leaders have valid reasons for wanting employees to return to the office. However, as the survey data suggests, the introduction of certain flexible measures is likely to benefit them as much as their workers.

The report found that 43% of workers are likely to leave their jobs in the next year, indicating that employees aren’t afraid to quit a job that doesn’t align with their priorities. Among the reasons for leaving, issues around personal mental health, work-life balance and lack of work flexibility were among the main motivating factors for staff.

These data suggest that the mass resignation is far from over and may have just entered a new phase. Therefore, at a time when labor shortages are commonplace and top talent is hard to find, business leaders should do everything possible to retain their quality staff.

If you’re worried about your staff becoming restless, here are some ways to get them back on board:

  • Listen to your staff – Communication with your staff should be two-way. By listening to your employees’ concerns and requests, you can create a workplace that is better suited to their needs and wants.
  • Check in regularly with your employees – No one likes to feel left on their own. Even if no issues were reported, reaching out to your team is a great way to get feedback and boost morale.
  • Use digital solutions – If your teams are working remotely, stay connected with communication tools like Slack and Google Chat. On a budget? Rest assured, there are also plenty of affordable and free ways to stay connected.
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Atos’ Cloudreach launches US Talent Academy as IT skills gap is at ‘crisis point’ https://work-fromhomee.com/atos-cloudreach-launches-us-talent-academy-as-it-skills-gap-is-at-crisis-point/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/atos-cloudreach-launches-us-talent-academy-as-it-skills-gap-is-at-crisis-point/ After seeing so many requests for its training program, Cloudreach, which French IT services giant Atos officially acquired last January, expanded its Talent Academy to the United States last week. “The skills gap is just insane, it’s reaching crisis point,” Poonam Flamarion, head of Cloudreach’s Talent Academy, told CRN. The inaugural cohort of the Talent […]]]>

After seeing so many requests for its training program, Cloudreach, which French IT services giant Atos officially acquired last January, expanded its Talent Academy to the United States last week.

“The skills gap is just insane, it’s reaching crisis point,” Poonam Flamarion, head of Cloudreach’s Talent Academy, told CRN.

The inaugural cohort of the Talent Academy, which partners with Amazon Web Services (AWS), started in late 2021, and many graduates are now working as associate cloud systems developers at London-based cloud computing consultancy Cloudreach. Many members of the training program had no formal training and had varied work experiences. Those with some technology background had little or no experience working in cloud technology.

“We interviewed people from all kinds of different backgrounds and we’re looking for that growth mindset,” Flamarion said. “We are constantly looking to evolve because we know we have the demand in terms of customer demand. And the talent is there. »

There is an endless demand for security and cloud skills, she added.

“We are looking to massively grow our professional services team, especially with the acquisition of ATO,” she said. “There’s no way to find that many experienced people ready to go, so this is a longer-term talent strategy, but it’s an absolutely necessary strategy.”

[Related: Trace3 President Joe Quaglia On Expansion, Finding Talent, And TD Synnex]

The two-year program sees new recruits spend the first 10 weeks in a classroom setting. After the 10 weeks, they then move on to client engagements. Over the course of two years, new recruits receive special support and benefit from regular interviews.

“We have a bonus specifically designed for them so that when they hit their workout goals, we can give them a bonus, so it’s kind of instant recognition,” she said.

They are employed full-time from day one. After the two-year period, they are usually promoted to the next level.

“When you change industries and start from scratch, we want them to stay with Cloudreach, so we want to make sure they’re there for the longer term,” she said.

The Talent Academy in North America, which started in Atlanta, had over 600 applicants. Only 20 are selected per cohort.

Flamarion said it’s not just about developing existing talent, but developing new talent.

“Let’s not continue to fish in the same pool,” she said. “We need to increase the size of the pool.”

And as she increased that pool, she realized that diversity in tech “is pretty bad.”

Program participants don’t need to have a technology background, it’s part of Cloudreach’s efforts to increase its diversity, equity and inclusion.

“That’s where the conversation is at Cloudreach. How can we do something meaningful?” she said. “Yes, we need to create more skills, but as a corporate citizen, what do we want to change? ?”

She said that with the North American program, 50% of applicants were women, as Cloudreach reached out to different organizations and nonprofit groups to expand their reach to attract people from different backgrounds.

“I had heard about the opportunities in cloud technology, but realized there weren’t a lot of young women of color in the industry,” said Esther Awolesi, a program participant. “I wanted to change that and be part of the growing statistic. I did a few bootcamps before joining Cloudreach but realized I didn’t know the basics until after I finished them. Cloudreach taught us the technologies and skills that we would use on real projects. Cloudreach took a chance on people, and it was very successful.

There’s also a lot of demand for people with security experience, but they’re hard to find, Flamarion said.

“Experience is the key word,” she said. “It is very difficult to find experienced security and cloud talent. You can’t just create experience overnight, over a week, over a year, but we have to create space for that talent and take our people to the next level.

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Nearly 50% of women consider themselves “very ambitious”: CNBC and Momentive survey https://work-fromhomee.com/nearly-50-of-women-consider-themselves-very-ambitious-cnbc-and-momentive-survey/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 16:12:17 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/nearly-50-of-women-consider-themselves-very-ambitious-cnbc-and-momentive-survey/ The current Covid-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on working women. In fact, two years into the crisis, the National Women’s Law Center reports that 1.1 million women are still out of the workforce. The economic future for women has looked bleak throughout the pandemic – but despite this downturn, more women are eager […]]]>

The current Covid-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on working women. In fact, two years into the crisis, the National Women’s Law Center reports that 1.1 million women are still out of the workforce.

The economic future for women has looked bleak throughout the pandemic – but despite this downturn, more women are eager to advance in their careers, re-enter the workforce and seize new opportunities than last year.

Nearly 50% of women consider themselves “very ambitious” and are optimistic about their career development, according to CNBC and Momentive’s new Women at Work survey. Of more than 4,800 participating women, 20% said their careers had progressed in the last six months, up from 14% in March 2021. More than a third of working women said they were “very satisfied” with the opportunities of their Current job. .

There are also some bright spots in the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest jobs report: 51% of new jobs created in February went to women, who made significant job gains in education, health services and recreation and hospitality.

“A lot of the trends towards remote and flexible working that companies have embraced over the past two years are changes that women have always wanted,” Runa Knapp, co-founder and chief commercial officer of Connectalent, a recruitment platform that helps women find jobs, says. “It levels the playing field for women in balancing jobs and care responsibilities and opens the door to new career paths that may not have been an option before the pandemic.”

CNBC Make It spoke with Knapp and Georgene Huang, co-founder and CEO of Fairygodboss, an online career platform for women, about what’s driving the rebound in women’s ambition and why workplace flexibility is a double-edged sword.

Reasons for increased ambition

Connectalent has seen a dramatic increase in the number of women looking for new jobs on its platform: in the last 11 months, applications have increased by 50% compared to the previous year.

So what has changed? Knapp points to two possible causes, starting with the drop in Covid cases across much of the United States. “Women have been forced out of the workforce in droves to care for their children stuck at home and their vulnerable loved ones,” she says.

When broken down by childcare responsibilities, ambition increased most significantly for women with younger children over the past year, with 54% of women with children under 18-year-olds describe themselves as “very ambitious” compared to 44% of women with children over 18 and 49% of women without children.

“There has never been a clear ‘light at the end of the tunnel’ with the pandemic, especially with the sudden school closures and the emergence of new virus variants,” adds Knapp. “But now that most children are back in school full time, working mothers in particular are more willing and able to return to work than ever.”

Knapp points out that the recent trend towards flexible workplaces could also boost women’s ambition. The pandemic has prompted more companies to implement flexible work policies, which can help women better balance the competing demands of their work and family life. Women spend a disproportionate amount of time taking care of household chores and childcare responsibilities, and according to the Pew Research Center, women are more likely than men to tailor their careers to family.

“A lot of the working moms we work with are really excited about the opportunity to be in a flexible arrangement because their companies weren’t even considering this option before the pandemic,” says Knapp. “So as long as companies continue to make their environments inclusive of all types of employees, I expect the levels of ambition to continue to increase and perhaps even exceed what we’ve seen before the pandemic.”

Of the 1,068 American working women polled by CNBC in early 2020, 54% said they were “very ambitious” when it came to their careers — that number fell to 42% in 2021, but climbed back up to 49% this year.

The pandemic has also sparked an awakening among women: After juggling work and parenting, and taking on more under-recognized and under-paid work than their male colleagues for two years, some women are starting to look to themselves and their hobbies.

“Women have largely been the default friend, daughter or parent who takes on the responsibilities throughout the pandemic,” Huang said. “Now there’s a collective awareness of ‘It’s time for me’…when you let go of some of those pressures on a personal level, it gives you more space to think about yourself and what you expect from a career.”

The disadvantages of flexible working hours

Flexibility – when implemented thoughtfully – can be a game-changer by creating more equitable and accessible work environments for women.

About 81% of business leaders believe hybrid working will be the norm by 2024, but 72% don’t have a detailed plan to adopt a permanent hybrid working model, according to new research from AT&T and Dubber Corporation Limited covering more than 300 managers based in the United States.

Compared to men, however, the CNBC and Momentive survey found that women are more likely to be concerned that taking advantage of flexible work arrangements will prevent them from achieving their career goals. . This is especially true for younger women: 24% of women aged 18-34 say they are “very worried” that being less in the office will hurt their career development, compared to 17% of women aged 35-64 and 8% of women aged 65 and over.

As for mothers, 25% of women with children under 18 say they are “very worried” about the impact of flexible working arrangements on their career trajectory compared to 16% of women with children aged 18 or over.

In conversations with his young employees, Huang often hears this concern. “They fear they won’t get the full experience of mentoring, training, or fitting into this flexible working world,” she says. “It’s this feeling of, ‘Am I missing something? What impact is this going to have on my career progression, because I’m not in the room?'”

However, women who are further along in their careers might feel more comfortable taking advantage of flexible work hours because their confidence increases along with their experience. A study by leadership development consultancy Zenger/Folkman found that a confidence gap affects women earlier in their careers, with the biggest gap being greatest among workers under 25.

“Some young women may feel like they haven’t earned flexible working hours yet because they haven’t had a chance to really prove themselves, as it may be more difficult to check with your manager to communicate and show results in a mostly remote environment,” says Knapp.

In flexible working, “flexible” should not just cover where women work, but how they work, she adds. This includes setting strict limits on not sending emails before or after work hours and allowing parents to structure their schedules around pick-up and drop-off times for their children or home appointments. the doctor so that women do not feel guilty about leaving the workforce to care for themselves and their families.

Huang predicts there will be a permanent shift to flexible work arrangements as long as hiring remains competitive. “If the job market turns, that’s when the rubber hits the road and we’ll see if people embrace flexibility for values-based reasons or just to attract talent,” she says.

She continues, “But companies need to realize that flexible and remote work options are keeping women on the job during a really tough time in life – early or mid-career – when there’s a lot of pressure to leaving…it can help prevent women from stalling progress.”

To verify:

These are the industries where women are progressing the most in the C-suite

Feeding America CEO shares the ‘transformative’ advice that changed her career

Black women have been ‘particularly hard hit’ by pandemic job losses – and they are still lagging in the recovery

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These companies offer IVF, fertility benefits and elder care to employees https://work-fromhomee.com/these-companies-offer-ivf-fertility-benefits-and-elder-care-to-employees/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 23:00:51 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/these-companies-offer-ivf-fertility-benefits-and-elder-care-to-employees/ With record numbers of workers leaving their jobs in search of something better every month, companies have to offer all kinds of incentives to make up for the labor shortage. While higher salaries are the obvious way to get people to work for you, job flexibility and benefits are also an important factor in the […]]]>

With record numbers of workers leaving their jobs in search of something better every month, companies have to offer all kinds of incentives to make up for the labor shortage.

While higher salaries are the obvious way to get people to work for you, job flexibility and benefits are also an important factor in the decision-making process for many new hires.

With much of the American workforce now part of the “sandwich generation,” navigating both later-life children and aging parents, what was once seen as an asset has become critical. .

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LinkedIn’s Reid Hoffman Creates AI Company With DeepMind Co-Founder https://work-fromhomee.com/linkedins-reid-hoffman-creates-ai-company-with-deepmind-co-founder/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 16:03:33 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/linkedins-reid-hoffman-creates-ai-company-with-deepmind-co-founder/ Reid Hoffman, author, businessman and co-founder of the networking platform ‘LinkedIn’, speaks during the DLD (Digital-Life-Design) conference in Munich, Germany, 19 January 2015. Image Alliance LinkedIn billionaire Reid Hoffman has co-founded a new artificial intelligence startup called Inflection AI with DeepMind co-founder Mustafa Suleyman and former DeepMind researcher Karén Simonyan. It’s the first time Hoffman […]]]>

Reid Hoffman, author, businessman and co-founder of the networking platform ‘LinkedIn’, speaks during the DLD (Digital-Life-Design) conference in Munich, Germany, 19 January 2015.

Image Alliance

LinkedIn billionaire Reid Hoffman has co-founded a new artificial intelligence startup called Inflection AI with DeepMind co-founder Mustafa Suleyman and former DeepMind researcher Karén Simonyan.

It’s the first time Hoffman has co-founded a company since selling LinkedIn to Microsoft for $26.2 billion in 2016. It’s also the first company Suleyman has co-founded since selling DeepMind to Google. in 2014 for around $600 million.

Inflection will be led by Suleyman, who will assume the role of CEO.

“AI is one of the most transformative technologies of our time,” Hoffman said in a statement shared with CNBC. “Mustafa has been at the forefront of some of the most exciting advances in artificial intelligence. It’s a privilege to join him and Karen in building Inflection.”

Inflection’s announcement, shared exclusively with CNBC, comes just weeks after Suleyman announced he was leaving his role as vice president at Google to work alongside Hoffman at Greylock Partners, a renowned venture capital firm. who invested in Facebook (now Meta) and Airbnb. The entrepreneurs have known each other for almost 10 years.

Before joining Google, Suleyman co-founded DeepMind in London with childhood friend Demis Hassabis and New Zealander Shane Legg in 2010.

In the lead up to the Google acquisition, Suleyman helped DeepMind raise millions of dollars from billionaires including Elon Musk and Peter Thiel. He also led the company’s applied AI efforts for several years, both before and after the acquisition.

What is inflection?

Based in Silicon Valley, Inflection will aim to develop AI software products that facilitate communication between humans and computers.

“If you think about the history of computing, we’ve always tried to reduce the complexity of our ideas in order to communicate them to a machine,” Suleyman told CNBC in a call Monday.

“Even when we write a search query, we simplify, reduce, or write in shorthand so the search engine can understand what we want.”

Mustafa Suleyman, co-founder of DeepMind

Greylock Partners

When humans want to control a computer, they must learn a programming language in order to provide instructions, he added, or use a mouse to navigate and interact with on-screen elements. “All of these allow us to simplify our ideas and reduce their complexity and in some ways their creativity and uniqueness so that a machine can do something,” Suleyman said.

The British entrepreneur has claimed that a new suite of technologies that Inflection will aim to develop will eventually allow anyone to talk to a computer in plain language.

It is unclear at this stage to whom Inflection will sell its products, at what price and when.

talk to machines

Human-computer interaction has advanced dramatically over the past decade, and many people now talk to AI-powered virtual assistants like Siri and Alexa on a daily basis.

While conversations are still far from seamless, computer scientists believe it’s only a matter of time before the experience becomes more seamless as machines get better at generating their own language.

“It feels like we’re on the verge of being able to generate language at roughly human-like performance,” Suleyman said, adding that he thinks it will almost certainly be possible within five years. “It opens up a whole new suite of things we can do in the product space.”

Greylock support

Greylock told CNBC he was investing in Inflection, but declined to say how much.

The venture capital firm also plans to “incubate” the company, providing it with marketing, introductions to technology leaders and hiring support.

Hoffman will retain his full-time position at Greylock.

In August 2019, Suleyman announced on Twitter that he was walking away from DeepMind, adding that he needed a “break to recharge”. Less than six months later, in December 2019, he announced that he was officially leaving the AI ​​lab he helped build to join Google as vice president of AI product management and AI policy.

The full circumstances of Suleyman’s departure from DeepMind were not disclosed at the time, but it later emerged that a number of his colleagues had taken issue with his management style, accusing him of harassment and bullying. . In January 2021, DeepMind announced that it had hired a law firm to investigate its management style.

“I had a period in 2017-18 where a few colleagues complained about my management style,” Suleyman said on a podcast in January where he was interviewed by Hoffman. “You know, I really screwed up. I was very demanding and quite relentless. I think sometimes it created an environment where I had pretty unreasonable expectations of what people had to deliver and when.”

When Suleyman announced he was joining Greylock, a VC, who asked to remain anonymous due to the sensitive nature of the discussion, wondered how long he would remain a VC. “My instincts say this is temporary while he looks for the next company to start or join as a founder,” they told CNBC. “I think there’s more in the tank.”

Suleyman said that while Inflection will take up the majority of his time, he plans to continue investing with Greylock.

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Top 5 work from home ideas for moms to earn and be independent https://work-fromhomee.com/top-5-work-from-home-ideas-for-moms-to-earn-and-be-independent/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 02:26:14 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/top-5-work-from-home-ideas-for-moms-to-earn-and-be-independent/ For most women, especially mothers, work-life balance can be hectic and difficult to accomplish. Thus, most women temporarily or permanently give up their careers to become the main caregivers of their children. Although family comes first, financial independence helps women feel secure and lifts their spirits. If young mothers have to care for young children, […]]]>

For most women, especially mothers, work-life balance can be hectic and difficult to accomplish. Thus, most women temporarily or permanently give up their careers to become the main caregivers of their children.

Although family comes first, financial independence helps women feel secure and lifts their spirits.

If young mothers have to care for young children, traditional full-time or even part-time jobs often don’t fit their lifestyle.

Fortunately, there are plenty of options today for women who want to work from home, at their own pace.

From a writer or blogger to an online tutor, here are some work-from-home ideas for moms that start out simple and can bring big rewards.

online tutor

Moms are really good at helping their kids learn new ideas and concepts, and that expertise is actually transferable to becoming a online tutor. The higher your level of education in a specific subject, the more money you can earn.

Many people around the world are studying English and are willing to pay for your help. You can earn money from home as a tutor without having to go outside. All you really want is an internet connection and a headset. This is a great flexible online job for stay at home moms as they can work as little as you want. The average salary for a tutor is 3,885,299 rupees per year.

Brand Ambassador

If you’re the type of person who likes to suggest new products, places, or trends to other people, and maybe try those things out yourself, then this is simply a method of making money doing that. what you are good at. .

Become a brand ambassador is an amazing work from home job because it doesn’t bother you with excessive work hours or require a relentless schedule. Your main tools are your social media accounts, so it’s ideal to start growing your followers as soon as possible. A brand ambassador earns around Rs 2,300,247 per year or Rs 1,105 per hour. Only the bottom 10%, to be precise, earn Rs 1,675,289 per year, while the the richest 10% earn about 3,122,129 rupees per year.

Data entry specialist

A data entry professional The work usually includes inputting data from different sources, which could possibly be edited into a PC for manipulation, management and business. They ensure the accuracy of the data they enter and revise the data in the database according to its needs.

Data entry jobs have had an adverse impact lately, but if you know where to land real data entry jobs, you have the opportunity to do exceptionally flexible work that requires little more than typing skills and attention to the smallest details. The average salary of a data entry specialist is Rs 2,046,898 per year.

Concealer

Online proofreading might be the perfect job for you if your spelling, grammar, syntax, and punctuation you’re on point, your scruples are strong, and you haven’t bothered with reading for a very long time.

Proofreading was the obligation of the author who created the content. As online content continues to fill in volume, online proofreaders will become increasingly popular. The average salary of a proofreader is 3,070,347 rupees per year. Entry-level positions start at Rs 2,149,243 annually, while most experienced workers earn up to Rs 4,605,521 annually.

Online proofreading is also one of the most adaptable work from home jobs for moms in a real sense. You can do it anytime, anywhere, as long as you stick to the time and deadlines.

Nursery

There are many different types of parents – some are housewives, while others work from home and need someone to look after their child for a few hours.

From now on, you take care of your own children and work well with them. So you’re probably going to be exceptional to take on a few more.

At first it’s great for you because you’ll get paid for extra work, but at the same time it’s great for your babies, who will get to know other babies. The normal annual salary for a childcare specialist is Rs 2,130,891 every year.

Most mothers are already part of a group or group of friends or companions with their own babies, so it shouldn’t be too difficult to get daycare clients. You can charge them competitive rates, and they’ll likely feel safer leaving their kids with someone they know and trust.

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How Gender Bias Persists in Female-Dominated Workplaces https://work-fromhomee.com/how-gender-bias-persists-in-female-dominated-workplaces/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 14:29:16 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/how-gender-bias-persists-in-female-dominated-workplaces/ New research examines gender bias in four sectors with more women than men: law, higher education, faith-based nonprofits and health care. Having a balanced or even greater number of women in an organization does not, in itself, change the experience of bias among women. Bias is built into the system and continues to operate even […]]]>

New research examines gender bias in four sectors with more women than men: law, higher education, faith-based nonprofits and health care. Having a balanced or even greater number of women in an organization does not, in itself, change the experience of bias among women. Bias is built into the system and continues to operate even when more women than men are present. Leaders can use these findings to create gender-equitable practices and environments that reduce bias. First, replace competition with cooperation. Second, measure success by goals, not time spent in the office or online. Third, implement fair compensation structures and provide flexible, remote work with autonomy. Finally, increase transparency in decision-making.

It is believed that once industries achieve gender balance, biases will decrease and gender gaps will close. Sometimes called the “add women and stir” approach, people tend to think that having more women present is enough to promote change. But simply adding women to a workplace does not change organizational structures and systems that benefit men more than women. Our new research (to appear in an upcoming issue of Staff review) shows that gender bias is still prevalent in female-dominated and gender-balanced sectors.

Most research on gender bias has focused on male-dominated industries like STEM or law enforcement, where women’s experiences of bias and discrimination may be more apparent. Our research is unique in that it examines gender bias in four sectors with more women than men: law, higher education, faith-based nonprofits, and health care. In these four industries, women dominate. They make up 53.5% of the workforce in law, 55.3% in higher education, 63.8% in faith-based associations, and 77.6% in health. Using the Gender Bias Scale for Women Leaders as well as open-ended questions, we compared the perceptions and experiences of gender bias for 1,606 women leaders in these areas across 15 factors, ranging from subtle (such as lack of recognition) to manifest (like the workplace). harassment).

Even though women are in the majority in these industries, we found that they still face a multitude of prejudices. An example is coerced communication, in which women need to be aware when expressing their authority and minimizing their accomplishments. They reported a lack of recognition for their contributions and were interrupted by men when speaking. And even when women were well represented, their workplace often still had a boys’ club mentality where decisions were made primarily by men. Participants were sometimes on a glass cliff, held accountable for issues beyond their control. They often lacked mentors and sponsors. Finally, some women found no choice but to limit their aspirations due to personal obligations. In other words, their workplace was not conducive to work-life balance. Beyond these barriers, our results showed notable differences in other aspects of gender bias across industries.

Law was the most challenging environment in our study. Women reported the highest levels of workplace exclusion and harassment compared to the other three industries. There is a long history of bias against women in the law. The competitive nature of the field and emphasis on billable hours can make it difficult to keep track of people with custodial responsibilities (especially women), thereby perpetuating inequities.

In contrast, women in higher education had comparatively the least challenging environment. These women reported facing communication constraints, unequal standards, unequal pay and even workplace harassment. Yet they experienced more egalitarian organizational standards, were more willing to seek promotions and other opportunities, had more endorsements, and received more recognition for their contributions compared to the other three industries. Higher education has a community nature, an orientation to social justice, and a commitment to shared governance and inclusiveness, especially in decision-making. Collective ownership and stakeholder contribution can lead to a comparatively better environment for women.

Women leaders in the faith-based nonprofit industry reported the lowest levels of queen bee syndrome, workplace harassment, and pay inequality compared to the other three samples. Of course, there are a few possible explanations for these results. First, the small number of female leaders of faith-based nonprofits may dampen queen bee behaviors. Second, the faith-based nature of these organizations may lead members to be nicer and women to accept their lower status, which could limit harassment. Finally, reports of pay inequality may have been mitigated by the industry’s generally low salary expectations and an unusual salary structure, in which couples are sometimes hired as a unit.

Our survey participants who worked in the health sector reported the second highest levels of unequal standards, second only to the law. Research in health care and other industries has found that so-called meritocratic reward systems increase gender inequalities in performance appraisals, division of labor and rewards, especially in specialized professional roles. . Additionally, social expectations that women are nurturing put pressure on female physicians to spend more time with patients and provide more emotional support than is expected of their male counterparts.

Obviously, having a balanced or even greater number of women in an organization does not, in itself, change the experience of bias among women. Bias is built into the system and continues to operate even when more women than men are present. But the good news is that leaders can use these findings to create gender-equitable practices and environments that reduce bias.

Replace competition with cooperation.

Eight studies of 147,000 people show that dominant and competitive leadership has the unintended consequence of zero-sum thinking – the belief that progress can only be achieved at the expense of others – among subordinates. Such environments deter workers from helping or supporting their colleagues.

Top leaders should model cooperation and encourage collaboration and teamwork. For example, the pharmaceutical company Pfizer had rapid execution and success with its mRNA Covid-19 vaccine thanks to a cooperative environment in which “everyone [was] shooting in the same direction with the same aim. They claimed the experience was “like magic”.

Measure success by goals, not time spent.

Too often, presenteeism functions as a measure of employee performance and dedication. As distributed workforces and remote working have taken hold, measuring performance by time spent in the office or online is no longer relevant. But giving people the freedom and responsibility to choose when they work can make managers anxious.

One way to solve this problem is to specify more and manage less. Clarify goals and how success is measured, but then let employees pursue their goals creatively and freely.

Establish fair reward structures.

While “meritocratic” reward systems like performance pay and billable hours may appear fair, they paradoxically increase gender inequality. One study found that managers in explicit meritocracies were less likely to award fair compensation and more likely to act on biases, for example by giving women lower bonuses.

It is better to set up cooperative reward structures that recognize all types of contributions to organizational goals. One way to do this is to measure business units not only on their own performance, but also on that of peer units, thereby encouraging employees to actively help their colleagues.

Provide remote and flexible work with autonomy.

While many companies implemented remote working before 2020, the pandemic has proven the success of remote and flexible working in many other industries. Not only have employee morale and work-life balance improved with less time on the road and more time for personal activities and family obligations, but even change-resistant industries like banking and finance continue to thrive with a remote workforce. In medicine, telehealth can improve opportunities for advancement and reduce burnout among women. Some organizations, like Salesforce and Arena Pharmaceuticals, have moved to full-time remote work. In other industries like higher education, a hybrid workforce may be preferable.

Although remote work is not an option for all jobs, flexibility can always be granted where possible. In retail, for example, workers may be allowed to have flexible start and end times and to swap or change their shifts. To boost motivation and performance, maximize employee autonomy to decide where and when their work gets done. Companies that refuse to offer autonomy, flexibility, or remote work when possible risk lowering employee morale and increasing turnover.

Increase transparency in decision-making.

When people feel included, they speak up and go the extra mile, which improves organizational performance. Transparent decision-making has been linked to increased employee trust, happiness, and engagement, and it fosters innovative thinking. Like the higher education shared governance model, full discussion and decisions should take place when stakeholders are present, rather than taking place in informal conversations. Leaders must ensure that everyone has a voice in meetings and that all perspectives are heard and considered.

Gender equity is not just about representation. We need to end gender bias at its root by fixing our organizations to make them inclusive, flexible, supportive and fair for women.

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Why high school girls aren’t interested https://work-fromhomee.com/why-high-school-girls-arent-interested/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 08:08:32 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/why-high-school-girls-arent-interested/ Construction is one of Australia’s fastest growing industries. It employs approximately 1,143,600 people, which represents 8.7% of the total workforce. Over the past five years, employment in the industry has increased by 7.3%. The median weekly wage for people working in construction is around AU$1,305 per week. This figure is higher than the median weekly […]]]>

Construction is one of Australia’s fastest growing industries. It employs approximately 1,143,600 people, which represents 8.7% of the total workforce. Over the past five years, employment in the industry has increased by 7.3%.

The median weekly wage for people working in construction is around AU$1,305 per week. This figure is higher than the median weekly earnings of $1,209.00 across all industries.

But construction is also Australia’s most male-dominated industry – 87% of workers are men. And high industry earnings are partly responsible for Australia’s gender pay gap. Figures from August 2021 show that strong earnings growth in the construction industry has pushed the gender pay gap for full-time workers to $261 a week.

But significant research and investment aimed at correcting the underrepresentation of women in construction has so far failed to have an impact.

We asked 15 young women in grades 11 and 12 about their perception of the sector. Most were unaware of the high incomes of the industry and said they could not imagine themselves in the job as they did not see many women there.

We randomly recruited female high school students to have a broader discussion about their career choices. We had no prerequisites regarding level of academic performance, interests, tertiary/TAFE education, or career goals.

The construction industry has work to do to educate schools and the public that it is a valid member of the highly valued STEM professions. Source: Ahmad Al-Basha/AFP

“There aren’t many successful women in construction”

Two study participants had relatives in the construction industry. But others knew very little about the vast and varied career opportunities in construction, or the fact that it was Australia’s third-largest employer and a growing sector.

Roles in construction include different trades – such as plumbers, carpenters, electricians and mechanics – project managers, engineers, communication and community engagement specialists, land surveyors, health and safety experts, crane operators and business managers to name a few. Pathways to these roles can be through college degrees, apprenticeships, internships and TAFE training.

A young woman told us:

I think at school we don’t see the construction industry as a range of roles. It’s on site and it’s masonry.

Almost all, 14 out of 15, of the young women surveyed said they could not imagine themselves in a construction career. They gave a range of reasons, including that it was too labor-intensive, it wasn’t prestigious enough, and they feared they wouldn’t be listened to or respected.

A young woman said:

I don’t see myself doing construction at all. I feel intimidated.

Asked about female role models in construction, students overwhelmingly said that the only women they could identify in the industry were those responsible for traffic management.

A young woman told us:

I don’t see many girls on construction sites who do more than hold the lollipop signs.

Another said

There aren’t many successful women in construction.

Construction career: a hostile and male-dominated sector?

A majority of participants (12 out of 15) had a negative view of the construction industry because it was male dominated.

They feared that they would not be respected in the workplace, that sexism would be tolerated, and that masculine behaviors such as aggression and assertiveness would be the norm.

A student said:

I want to know that what I enter into people there will respect me. I would want an equal chance of getting a promotion if there was a man next to me.

In some cases, a career in construction did not align with their altruistic aspirations to serve the community and help people, while in other cases participants said they did not perceive construction careers to be creative or interesting. A girl said:

I am interested in doing good for society and helping people. Construction wouldn’t give me that opportunity.

However, the students had a different view of engineering and recalled the efforts of their professors and universities to promote STEM subjects to female students.

The construction industry has work to do to educate schools and the public that it is a valid member of the highly valued STEM professions. Almost all construction roles involve science, technology, engineering, and math.

A realignment of values ​​to attract young women

To address gender equity, the construction sector must engage directly with young women and address the sometimes valid and sometimes mistaken beliefs they may have about the industry.

To have a chance of overcoming its poor reputation with young women, the sector will need to revisit its outdated masculine behaviors and champion the women who are already successful in the sector. For example, Alison Mirams (CEO of Roberts Co), Rebecca Hanley (Managing Director of Laing O’Rourke Australia since April 2022) and Josephine Sukkar AM (Co-owner and Director of Buildcorp) are women leading major Australian construction companies .

The sector must also focus on retaining and advancing the women who already work there through initiatives such as flexible work practices, transparent promotion procedures and paid parental leave.

Better communication about the diversity of roles in the sector can help generate greater interest among female students. The sector also needs to work with school guidance counsellors, who often have little knowledge of the sector and tend to refer male students to it.The conversation

Natalie Galea, Senior Lecturer, University of Melbourne and Phillippa Carnemolla, Senior Researcher, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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Tech companies rank first for graduates | information age https://work-fromhomee.com/tech-companies-rank-first-for-graduates-information-age/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 01:44:26 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/tech-companies-rank-first-for-graduates-information-age/ With lecture halls closed, earning college degrees during the pandemic has been difficult — but as new graduates ponder where to find their first job, tech-focused companies remain among the most welcoming and rewarding options. , according to a new survey. Four tech companies – Canva, Google, Xero Australia and Amazon – have made the […]]]>

With lecture halls closed, earning college degrees during the pandemic has been difficult — but as new graduates ponder where to find their first job, tech-focused companies remain among the most welcoming and rewarding options. , according to a new survey.

Four tech companies – Canva, Google, Xero Australia and Amazon – have made the top 10 of GradAustralia’s new Top 100 Graduate Employers list, along with tech stalwarts Optus, Telstra, MYOB, DXC Technology, FDM Group and Microsoft all sit inside the top 50.

There were also good reviews for graduate recruitment programs from mainstream companies known for their heavy use of technology, with top 20 rankings for Coles, ANZ Bank, BHP, Coles, Deloitte, PwC, Capgemini and even the Australian Security Intelligence Organization (ASIO).

The rankings are based on both student popularity and the quality of the programme, explained GradAustralia, ensuring that the rankings reflect the experiences of graduate recruitment processes for those who drag themselves from interview to other.

But what makes a company particularly attractive to young graduates?

Money was far from the primary consideration for employees at the number 1 online design unicorn Canva, whose recent graduates gave top scores in areas such as corporate social responsibility, culture of , diversity, sustainability, office work environment and other workplaces. – related metrics.

New hires praised “very flexible” work hours, convenient office spaces, no dress code, childcare programs, LGBT support and diversity training, initiatives to support the COVID-19 pandemic and other programs to support its more than 800 employees.

“People really follow the company value of ‘being a good human,'” one Canva employee said, while another noted that “everyone always aspires to be a force for good at work. and outside”.

Amazon ANZ, ranked ninth, also posted high marks for cultural metrics, career prospects, its “incredible” office and work environment, and overall satisfaction, although some graduates noted the steep learning curve. when starting technical jobs.

“The interview process was rigorous with many difficult technical questions supplemented by behavioral questions,” said one reviewer, adding “the interviewers always made me feel welcome and calm.”

Strong support during and after recruitment improves companies’ perception as employers of choice, with Optus – ranked 5and among technology companies and 18and overall – scoring near-perfect tens for recruiting, culture, management, and satisfaction.

“My team is so supportive and willing to teach,” said one reviewer, “which made me feel confident and comfortable asking questions and learning.”

Another praised the company’s management who are “available whenever I need them and take the time to help me with anything I ask”.

Fight for skills

With recent surveys revealing that forcing workers back into the office can be disastrous and 52% of IT professionals would not recommend their current workplace no matter how much free food it provides, employers offering pastoral support strong are likely to fare better with graduate talent meeting the challenges of the post-pandemic workforce.

Finding work after graduation was already difficult before the pandemic, with a 2019 Australia Institute study noting that only 73% of recent graduates secured full-time employment in a job market described as “intensely liberal, dog-eat-dog”. .

With employers pressured to support remote working, many have refocused their ambitions and rethought recruitment and culture building – but growing investment in digital transformation has seen many companies hire more graduates than ever before.

“We were looking to increase the engineering, cybersecurity, data and analytics skills that cut across the organization,” said Sian Lewis, group head of human resources at 20and-rated Commonwealth Bank of Australia, said at the recent Gartner IT Symposium.

“We’re hiring four times as many engineers as we did 18 months ago,” she continued, citing growing demand for software, cloud engineering and other skills that had led the company to hire around 100 engineers per month.

“There was already a really big agenda for us to get into a space where we could compete with the tech giants and the fintechs that are getting into financial services,” Lewis said, “and one of the things what I’m most proud of is that we didn’t back out of graduate recruitment.

“During the first lockdown, we managed to recruit 200 tech graduates at a time when many other organizations were pulling back from campus.”

Tech graduates aren’t the only ones targeted by top employers: overall, according to GradAustralia, top companies are actively recruiting across all disciplines.

Eighth-ranked cloud accounting firm Xero, for example, is not only recruiting conventional STEM graduates, but has also hired business and management majors; creative arts; humanities, arts and social sciences; law, legal studies and justice; property and the built environment; and teaching and education.

This echoes observations from the Australia Institute, which noted that despite recent emphasis on STEM education, “mathematics graduates have one of the worst full-time placement rates of any discipline” .

“Employers report that they are particularly looking for candidates with verbal, social, problem-solving and communication skills.”

The GradAustralia rankings corroborate recent research by Contino which found that workers valued traits such as company culture and the ability to work with modern technology the most, and were the most likely to leave a job due to a “bad” leadership or management team.

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Nike’s new back-to-office plan coincides with the brand’s 50th anniversary https://work-fromhomee.com/nikes-new-back-to-office-plan-coincides-with-the-brands-50th-anniversary/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 23:27:47 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/nikes-new-back-to-office-plan-coincides-with-the-brands-50th-anniversary/ Nike this week announced a “phased return” to US offices, with most workers expected to return by May 3. In December, the company delayed the return to its offices indefinitely. The new return date coincides with the brand’s 50th anniversary in May. Loading Something is loading. Most Nike employees will return to the company’s US […]]]>
  • Nike this week announced a “phased return” to US offices, with most workers expected to return by May 3.
  • In December, the company delayed the return to its offices indefinitely.
  • The new return date coincides with the brand’s 50th anniversary in May.

Most Nike employees will return to the company’s US offices in time to celebrate the brand’s 50th anniversary.

The sportswear giant sent an email to employees on Wednesday outlining the company’s new “gradual return” to its offices. A copy of the email was reviewed by Insider.

“The gradual return kicks into high gear on May 3 – thankfully coinciding with our 50th anniversary! – when the 3/2 flexible hybrid working approach is launched,” human resources director Monique Matheson wrote in the E-mail.

Like many big companies, Nike has repeatedly changed its return-to-office plans. In December, the company delayed its return to the office indefinitely following employee criticism and a spike in COVID-19 cases due to Omicron.

That month, an internal email showed that only 54% of employees thought Nike’s return-to-work plan offered them enough flexibility. Several employees said the forced return to the office would hamper the company’s recruiting efforts, especially among high-demand tech workers.

The popularity of the current back-to-office plan with workers remains uncertain, but Nike is moving forward.

“Now, with cautious optimism, I am excited to share a new approach and timeline for returning to our US offices,” Matheson wrote in the email.

On Monday, April 4, the company will begin a “transition month” back in the office, according to the email. Nike did not respond to Insider’s request for comment.

From May 3, most Nike employees will be required to be in the office three days a week, with the option to work remotely the other two days. Nike also continues to “pilot” a full-time remote schedule with some workers.

“We used to set a return date – now we’re staggering our return over the next few months to give you the time, space and flexibility you need to plan and prepare,” Matheson wrote.

Matheson wrote in this week’s email that Nike will continue to “embrace flexibility.”

“We are evaluating additional flexible work options and wellness initiatives, and expect to have good news to share on this front in the coming months,” she wrote.

Do you work at Nike or have ideas to share? Contact journalist Matthew Kish via the encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-971-319-3830) or email (mkish@insider.com). Check out Insider’s source guide for more tips on sharing information safely.

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