Jobs no experience – Work From Homee http://work-fromhomee.com/ Fri, 06 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://work-fromhomee.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png Jobs no experience – Work From Homee http://work-fromhomee.com/ 32 32 Lawyers Face Lawyer Shortage in Yakima County | Crime and courts https://work-fromhomee.com/lawyers-face-lawyer-shortage-in-yakima-county-crime-and-courts/ Fri, 06 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/lawyers-face-lawyer-shortage-in-yakima-county-crime-and-courts/ Grocery store workers and restaurant staff aren’t the only jobs that are in high demand these days. In Yakima County, lawyers are also rare. “When we opened and posted our first position in 2013, 20 to 30 people applied,” said Tim Hall, a Hall and Gilliland partner in Yakima who is trying to fill a […]]]>

Grocery store workers and restaurant staff aren’t the only jobs that are in high demand these days.

In Yakima County, lawyers are also rare.

“When we opened and posted our first position in 2013, 20 to 30 people applied,” said Tim Hall, a Hall and Gilliland partner in Yakima who is trying to fill a vacancy. “Now we receive one, two or three candidates.”

At the county level, Yakima County District Attorney Joe Brusic and Paul Kelley, director of the Court-appointed Counsel Department, are trying to fill vacancies in their offices.

“We’re all struggling to deal with the issue that we’re not getting candidates, and when we do, it’s a lateral move,” Brusic said, referring to when an agency prosecutor moves to a other. “Stealing Peter to pay Paul doesn’t help.”

The problem, according to Hall and others, is a combination of the lack of law graduates to replace those retiring or leaving the profession, as well as the challenge of repaying law student loans from the prevailing salaries offered in the Yakima Valley.

While Hall hopes economic forces will restore balance, Brusic said Yakima County is considering making its salaries more competitive, as well as reaching out to law schools to recruit. And a local university is partnering with state law schools to try to inspire more people of color to get into law and hopefully work in the community.

Currently, there are 438 attorneys in Yakima County, according to the latest figures from the Washington State Bar Association, which places it in the top nine in the state. That’s 1.4% of the state’s 31,124 attorneys, a figure that also includes those with inactive, honorary, or emeritus licenses as well as sitting judges.

One factor in the equation is that there are fewer law school graduates, lawyers say. When he attended Gonzaga University Law School in 2000, Hall said incoming classes were around 140 to 160, but jumped to 240 soon after, and in 2015 the numbers have dropped.

American Bar Association records show Gonzaga’s total registration in 2011 was 506, with the 2016 registration at 305 and climbing to 449 last year. The University of Washington School of Law had 545 students in 2011, down from 498 in 2017 and 492 last year.

Seattle University’s law school had 1,002 students in 2011, then grew to 609 in 2017 and 677 last year, according to bar numbers.

Brusic said fewer graduates are interested in becoming prosecutors, and he doesn’t think law schools actively encourage them to go in that direction.

“With the problems that police and prosecutors have locally, a lot of young people don’t want to enter those professions,” Brusic said.

Another factor is student debt. A law school grad can come out of school with $150,000 or more in student loans, depending on the school, which Hall and Brusic say may make a new lawyer think twice about accepting. a job that pays between $60,000 and $70,000 a year.

Even with the 5% pay raise Yakima County commissioners recently approved to address staffing shortages, Brusic said the starting salary for an inexperienced prosecutor is $66,486. For one of the county’s public defenders, it’s $66,490.

Geography also works against recruiting attorneys, Kelley said, because some people may not be as interested in going to central Washington as opposed to a more populated area where salaries and job opportunities may be better.

And those who come from outside the region to work here may not stay long, Brusic said. He said they are the least likely to put down roots in the community and plan to move on in a few years.

Kelley said finding lawyers was a challenge before the pandemic, which hasn’t helped. It is trying to fill three vacancies to bring its staff to 20.

Like people in other professions, some lawyers have seen the pandemic-related closures as a way to re-evaluate their career goals and choose to retire or find another profession.

“Being a lawyer is a pretty stressful job,” Hall said.

And for Brusic and Kelley, vacancies mean their lawyers have to take on more work.

Brusic, who said his office is short of five lawyers, has prosecutors handling up to 120 cases a year.

“From my perspective, they work hard every day for the people of this county,” Brusic said.






Attorneys work in court Thursday, May 5, 2022 at the Yakima County Jail in Yakima, Wash.



Kelley attorneys are limited to the number of cases they can handle under state court rules. The rules ensure lawyers can effectively represent their indigent clients, with a limit of 150 criminal cases per lawyer per year. Kelley said the rules also weight cases based on the seriousness of the crime, which reduces the actual number of cases a lawyer can take on.

“So far so good,” Kelley said. “But if our numbers don’t improve and deposits increase, some decisions will have to be made about how to handle that and maintain the standards.

“It’s a delicate dance that we have to do to maintain it. We must be true to these standards or we will be in trouble.

Brusic agrees.

“We want competent public defenders,” Brusic said. “We want them to work hard and do their jobs efficiently.” Otherwise, he said cases were thrown out on appeal because someone didn’t have an effective lawyer to represent them.

Hall hopes that economic forces will eventually solve the problem, as vacancies will encourage more people to decide to go to law school to meet the need and bring supply in line with demand.

Brusic said the county is looking at his salaries to make him competitive with other agencies, and he’s also considering going to law school job fairs to showcase the benefits of working as a county attorney. from Yakima.

“There’s more money in private practice, but what I’m emphasizing for lawyers here is that there’s a richness to this work that you won’t find in private practice,” said Brusic.

Heritage University in Toppenish announced this year that it is working with Seattle University, Gonzaga, and the University of Washington on a program to encourage students, especially Latino and Native American students, to consider going at law school. It is hoped that this program could result in more lawyers in central Washington.

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Hybrid working is a “recipe for disaster” https://work-fromhomee.com/hybrid-working-is-a-recipe-for-disaster/ Wed, 04 May 2022 15:45:15 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/hybrid-working-is-a-recipe-for-disaster/ Business leaders are unaware of the chaos and dysfunction that comes with two-tier work … [+] environment. Getty Not everyone is a fan of the hybrid working model. One of the only vocal critics of this style of work is GitLab maintainer Darren Murph. He argues it’s a “recipe for disaster”. Murph is highly skeptical […]]]>

Not everyone is a fan of the hybrid working model. One of the only vocal critics of this style of work is GitLab maintainer Darren Murph. He argues it’s a “recipe for disaster”.

Murph is highly skeptical of Big Tech and other companies that claim hybrid is the “best of both worlds.” As an early leader of the remote work revolution, Murph points out that business leaders are unaware of the chaos and dysfunction that accompanies a two-tier work environment.

The remote chief officer gives a dire warning, predicting that offices will become epicenters of power and not everyone will have fair contact time with leadership. Hybrid working will stifle transparency and make team members feel separated from cooler conversations. You will feel like a second-class citizen when you are at home, while others are in the office.

Choose in office or remote – you can’t have both

Instead of going hybrid, Murph recommends organizations commit either fully to the office, which he’s not a fan of, or to a remote program. He argues that in the current phase, characterized by a dynamic labor market with more than 11 million positions available and a record 4.5 million people leaving their jobs last month, there are more choices for researchers. employment.

This may lead some companies to capitalize on this trend by deploying a remote option to attract, recruit and retain workers. The logic makes sense; However, if the company doesn’t have a solid plan to handle a combination of remote and in-office work, it could lead to significant challenges down the road. There can be unintended consequences, such as the alienation of office workers and telecommuters, which will eventually cause people to leave for other opportunities.

The shock and FOMO between telecommuters and office workers

There is an inherent imbalance between those who go to an office and the people at home. It starts in the morning. A distant person wakes up and doesn’t have to face an hour or more of commuting. They will be working while office staff are still stuck on crowded trains, buses and highways. The wear and tear on their mental and physical health has repercussions.

Meanwhile, people at home can be seen as an afterthought. Managers will forget to get them on critical Zoom calls. They will miss impromptu and chance encounters in the hallway, cafeteria and elevators. As the top brass eliminate a select group of office workers to celebrate a big win, the homeworkers, who may have been instrumental in the success, are left out of the party.

There will be a fear of missing out (FOMO) for both groups. Those at home will fear becoming second-class citizens, excluded from important conversations and decision-making. They will start resenting people in the office who gain favor, due to proximity bias. It’s easier to hand off an important task or a new client to the person in the next office, rather than tracking down a remote worker. If the incumbent team receives higher salaries, bonuses and promotions due to face-to-face time rather than performance, it will lead to a conflicted division of the workforce.

You can expect the office team to grow increasingly resentful of people working comfortably from home, as they wait outside in freezing weather for a train that’s an hour late. It is reasonable to believe that they will also start to feel aggrieved. While remote people attend milestone events, such as school plays, sports, dance classes, and bonding times, office teams miss out on those unique moments.

The benefits of remote work

Murph, an avowed champion of remote work, says 25% of all professional jobs in the United States will be remote by the end of this year. Dubbed the “remote work oracle” by CNBC, Murph highlights the success of his company, GitLab, a DevOps platform, which has 1,200 employees in more than 65 countries. GitLab has been fully remote since its inception.

He says remote work requires an intentional decision to create, cultivate and manage a distributed workforce. It takes a tremendous amount of thought, planning, attention to detail and execution. Murph says running a remote business is all about trusting your employees. It also calls for communication, feedback, strong leadership, and a company-wide sense of shared mission and goals.

Murph believes companies that smartly adopt and manage a remote workforce will succeed and thrive. Because of the lifestyle, fairness, level playing field, and appreciation of freedom and autonomy, remote businesses are likely to attract some of the best and brightest talent. It will make the business bigger, stronger and better. They will siphon off A players from companies that have ordered their staff back to the office full time. Angered by the lack of choice, these organizations will suffer from a steady stream of attrition. The result is that the best talents will leave to competitors.

Remote work is life changing

Murph hopes his remote work movement will leave a legacy of change, allowing more people and businesses to join this trend. From direct experience of himself, his company’s employees, and the places he’s advised, remote work has been better for mental health, emotional well-being, and better quality of work and life. life.

He advocates that by working from anywhere, you can better appreciate your family, friends and neighbors. Without time-consuming trips, you can enjoy your hobbies, exercise and take better care of yourself.

The remote work leader points out that remote work will have created other positive changes in the world. For example, Americans who live in rural communities far from Silicon Valley and Wall Street will now have more options. Likewise, people around the world no longer have to abandon their family and loved ones to find a great, well-paying job based in a different city, state, or country. Small communities that continually lose young people, due to lack of job opportunities, can now stay and help revitalize small towns across the United States. The remote model, according to Murph, is one of the best ways to provide a level playing field for your career. .

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10 tips on how to get a job with a crime https://work-fromhomee.com/10-tips-on-how-to-get-a-job-with-a-crime/ Tue, 03 May 2022 00:00:03 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/10-tips-on-how-to-get-a-job-with-a-crime/ A felony is a serious offense that can stay on your record for life, and if you have a felony it can be difficult to find a job. Many employers will not hire people who are guilty of a crime. However, don’t despair; there are things you can do to get a job even if […]]]>

A felony is a serious offense that can stay on your record for life, and if you have a felony it can be difficult to find a job. Many employers will not hire people who are guilty of a crime. However, don’t despair; there are things you can do to get a job even if you have a crime on your record.

10. Be realistic

If you have a crime, you need to be realistic about the types of jobs you can get. You probably won’t be able to get jobs in specific sectors, such as health or education. But there are still many other types of jobs you could get, such as customer service, retail, or catering. Don’t waste your time applying for jobs you know you won’t get by looking for a job. It is best to focus your efforts on missions for which you are more qualified.

9. Ask for help

One of the most important things you can do is ask for help. You might be surprised at how many people are willing to help you if they know you need a job. Many community groups, organizations and businesses have programs to help criminals get back on their feet. The more people you contact, the better your chances of finding a job. Some of the programs you might want to look into include the following:

  • The Federal Bonding Program: This program provides bonding insurance to employers who want to give someone a second chance. It covers theft or other forms of dishonesty and provides the employer with insurance if things don’t work out.
  • The Work Opportunity Tax Credit: This program offers a tax incentive to employers wishing to hire a person who has committed a crime. It may not cover all costs, but it can help employers reduce costs.
  • Veterans Employment and Training Service: This service provides assistance to veterans, including those with a crime record. He can help with federal career opportunities and other employment programs for veterans.
  • The Reentry One-Stop Career Center: These centers help ex-offenders find employment. They offer job search assistance, pre-employment training and placement services.

8. Beware of scams

There are many employment scams that target people with criminal records. Be very careful when looking for a job and be sure to research any company or person you plan to work with. There are a few things to watch out for:

  • Promises of easy money: Beware of anyone who promises you a well-paid job with little or no experience.
  • Upfront Fee: Beware of anyone asking you to pay an upfront fee, especially if they guarantee you a job.
  • Out-of-state offers: Beware of anyone who gives you a job that requires you to leave the state.
  • Unrealistic claims: beware of anyone who promises you a job without an interview or application.
  • If you are careful and do your research, you can avoid many scams that target people with criminal records.

7. Learn a new skill

If your crime is preventing you from getting the job you want, it might be time to learn a new skill. It can help you find a job in a different field or open up new opportunities. There are many ways to learn new skills, including online courses, community colleges, and vocational schools. To learn a new skill, start by considering your interests and strengths. Do you work well with your hands? Do you like working with computers? Once you have an idea of ​​what you would like to do, research training programs that can help you get started.

6. Work with your hands

Appearance is an important factor for employers, especially those looking to hire people with backgrounds. If you can’t afford clothes that will make you look presentable, consider doing manual labor. Please work with your hands to show that you are not afraid to get them dirty and that you are willing to put in the effort. Many employers will respect this and see it as a good sign that you are willing to work hard.

5. Safe References

You can’t get a job with a felony conviction unless you have at least one reference. Yes, even if you work on the family farm with your father, you still need references because they will ask you for them if you apply for a job. References can be anyone credible. You will often want to choose successful people, such as managers and supervisors from previous jobs. But other options include teachers or coaches from your past or community leaders. If you don’t have a solid list, start by asking for references from past employers. They may not have a reasonable opinion of you, but that may be your only option.

4. Join the army

One option that many people with felony convictions may not consider is to join the military. Although this method involves an intense and lengthy application process, it is a great way to get your life back. The military will provide you with a stable income, benefits, and structure to help you find your way past prison. Additionally, you may be able to use the military as a stepping stone to finding other opportunities after serving your sentence. To get started, talk to a recruiter in your area. They can help you understand the process and determine whether or not you are eligible.

3. Erase your crime

Clearing up your crime is one of the best things you can do to increase your chances of getting hired. If your crime is deleted, it will not appear on your criminal record. This is important because many employers won’t hire you if they see you have a crime on your record. In addition, you will have a better chance of getting the job you want if it does not appear on your file. Here are the steps to follow to erase your file:

  • Step 1: Obtain a copy of your criminal record. You can do this by finding the appropriate courthouse for where you were convicted.
  • Step 2: Complete the petition.
  • Step 3: File the petition and pay an application fee.
  • Step 4: Go to court on the day of your court appearance.

2. Start your own business

A business is a great way to keep your mind busy, show off your skills, and earn money. When done right, owning your own business can provide you with enough income to support yourself and your family. It can also help you avoid situations where you’re likely to get into trouble, such as living in a bad neighborhood. The best place to start is to search online for business ideas. Many websites offer advice on starting your own business. You can also find books at the library or bookstore to provide you with valuable information. When deciding on a business idea, it’s important to consider your skills and interests. You should also think about how much time and money you are willing to invest. Once you’ve decided on an idea, it’s important to create a business plan that outlines your ideas and strategies. Finally, you will need to obtain the necessary licenses and permits to set up your business. This will involve working with local authorities and ensuring you comply with all regulations. With proper planning, hard work, and determination, you can successfully start your own business.

1. Get a GED

Having a high school diploma or GED is essential if you want to be hired for most jobs. Education, including vocational training and college, can open up opportunities that might not otherwise be available to you. Additionally, many employers prefer to hire people with a GED over those without, so having one can increase your chances of getting hired. If you don’t have a GED, start by creating a study schedule you can stick to and enroll in classes. There are plenty of resources available to help you get a GED, so take advantage of them and see what steps you need to take to get yours.

Conclusion

Being convicted of a crime does not mean you will never find a job. With the right approach, you can get hired and start climbing your career ladder. To improve your chances of getting a felony job, focus on getting references, building relationships with potential employers, and working hard on your job search. With patience and persistence, you can get hired and rebuild your life after you get out of prison.

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DEAR ABBY: A favor for an old friend ends up destroying their relationship https://work-fromhomee.com/dear-abby-a-favor-for-an-old-friend-ends-up-destroying-their-relationship/ Sun, 01 May 2022 07:30:21 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/dear-abby-a-favor-for-an-old-friend-ends-up-destroying-their-relationship/ DEAR ABBY: A few months ago, I offered to help an old friend with some landscaping. The area to be developed is tiny. I was worried that a professional landscaper would overcharge him. She contacted a landscaper all the same – not to hire him, but to choose his brains. When he arrived, it was […]]]>

DEAR ABBY: A few months ago, I offered to help an old friend with some landscaping. The area to be developed is tiny. I was worried that a professional landscaper would overcharge him. She contacted a landscaper all the same – not to hire him, but to choose his brains.

When he arrived, it was obvious he didn’t want the job and she didn’t offer it to him. She accepted my offer. It then dithered for a few months, during which time I took care of other projects. But I made time for him and we sat down to review his project. She confessed that she had no experience with landscaping and plant selection, and that she needed my help with that as well.

After she pooped out the most viable suggestions I came up with, we started looking at plants – lots of plants – none of which she liked. After a frustrating few hours, she mentioned that she would just plant what she had originally thought of planting. I told her that if she did that, she didn’t need my help. She told me I needed to be more patient, and if she had known I wouldn’t help her, she would have hired the landscaper after all. (That wasn’t true. She had never intended to hire him.)

I told her she needed to be more decisive, and even though she told me she needed my experience, she didn’t accept any of it. She also couldn’t see that she had wasted hours of my time. We’ve barely spoken since. So, am I wrong here?

— The Green Thumb in Texas

DEAR GREEN THUMB: No, you’re not wrong. No good deed goes unpunished. Consider yourself lucky to have barely spoken since. And then don’t bring it up again unless you want to experience more frustration.

DEAR ABBY: I’m the operations manager for a nursing/rehabilitation home in Montana. My residents and I want you to know how much we appreciate your column. We read it every day and discuss what kind of advice we would give your letter writers. Your column is a highlight of our afternoons.

We would also like to remind your readers that there are many homes like ours, filled with people like us. We would appreciate and benefit from being recognized by our communities, not just during the holidays, but throughout the year. These houses are full of your grandparents, parents and other family members and friends. Our community has always been loving and supportive of us. We hope homes in other locations will be as lucky as we are.

Thank you for your column. We expect more!

— Faithful resident,

Deer Lodge, Mt.

DEAR RESIDENT: Thank you for your kind words and thoughtful letter. I am happy that your residents have the support of the good citizens of your community; it says nice things about the people of Montana. I know my column is discussed around many breakfast tables and water coolers because it’s a surefire conversation starter. This is the reason why it is popular in many nursing homes and rehabilitation centers.

I hope that more readers will find the time to visit the residents of these homes, not only for the joy it will bring them, but also to benefit from the wealth of experience these people have gained over their long life. While visitors are plentiful during the holidays, they are very quiet at other times.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write to Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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Botched neck liposuction will cost Ontario woman $20,000 to correct https://work-fromhomee.com/botched-neck-liposuction-will-cost-ontario-woman-20000-to-correct/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 22:47:40 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/botched-neck-liposuction-will-cost-ontario-woman-20000-to-correct/ An Ontario woman who dreamed of correcting what she called her “double chin” will now have to shell out up to $20,000 to fix a botched cosmetic surgery. “I’m depressed and crying every day and have started taking medication for my depression. I look in the mirror, I see all these scars,” said Riba Hassan […]]]>

An Ontario woman who dreamed of correcting what she called her “double chin” will now have to shell out up to $20,000 to fix a botched cosmetic surgery.

“I’m depressed and crying every day and have started taking medication for my depression. I look in the mirror, I see all these scars,” said Riba Hassan of Thornhill, Ont.

Hassan said she approached a plastic surgery clinic to undergo neck liposuction. She said that although she was worried that the doctor who was to perform the procedure had limited experience, she went ahead and paid $5,000 for the operation.

“That part of my face is like a double chin, it bothered me, so I decided to do some kind of liposuction, like a minor surgery,” Hassan said.

After the operation, Hassan had bulging areas on his neck and scars around his ears. The same clinic performed a second surgery for free, but the problems remained and were not corrected.

While the initial operation cost $5,000, Hassan said she will now have to pay a lot more to get her neck problems fixed.

“It depends, different doctors, good doctors, say it won’t be less than $20,000, but between $15,000 and $25,000,” Hassan said.

Although the clinic agreed to continue working with Hassan to try to address her concerns, she said she no longer felt comfortable dealing with them.

There has been an increase in cosmetic surgeries during the pandemic, in part because more people are using video calls and sharing photos on social media.

Although the majority of procedures go smoothly, surgeons who perform plastic surgery operations say that any medical procedure can carry risks.

Dr Julie Khanna is a plastic surgeon with 25 years of experience and is not involved in Hassan’s case. Khanna is the Past President of the Canadian Society for Aesthetic and Plastic Surgery and the Medical Director of Plastic Surgery ICLS in Oakville, Ontario.

Khanna said that before going ahead with any plastic surgery procedure, research is key and it’s important to make sure the doctor is experienced and certified.

“I think whenever you think about plastic surgery, the most important thing is to go see someone who is qualified and someone who specializes in that area,” Khanna said.

Khanna said it was important to “check they are trained by the Royal College of Surgeons and ensure they have that designation”.

“Also look at their practice, what are they doing? Make sure you go to someone reputable and meet more than one doctor,” Khanna said.

CTV News Toronto has contacted the clinic where Hassan had his procedures, but we have not received any comment. The clinic agreed to reimburse Hassan for the $5,000 she paid for the operation.

“I’m happy, it’s good, because at least I can use this money for the other operation I have to do,” Hassan said.

Before agreeing to any cosmetic procedure, make sure you fully understand the risks and benefits and also see if there are other treatments available that do not require surgery.

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NCAA President Mark Emmert steps down no later than 2023 https://work-fromhomee.com/ncaa-president-mark-emmert-steps-down-no-later-than-2023/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 22:26:38 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/ncaa-president-mark-emmert-steps-down-no-later-than-2023/ INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — NCAA President Mark Emmert is stepping down after 12 tumultuous years at the helm of an association that has become marginalized as college sport has undergone massive change and been besieged by political and political attacks. legal. NCAA Board of Governors Chairman John DeGioia announced the decision on Tuesday and said it […]]]>

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — NCAA President Mark Emmert is stepping down after 12 tumultuous years at the helm of an association that has become marginalized as college sport has undergone massive change and been besieged by political and political attacks. legal.

NCAA Board of Governors Chairman John DeGioia announced the decision on Tuesday and said it was by mutual agreement. Emmert, 69, will continue in office until a new president is in place or until June 30, 2023.

The move is not entirely a surprise. The NCAA remains the largest governing body in college athletics, but it has come under heavy criticism for years for being too cumbersome and even outdated, with Emmert being the primary target.

Emmert guided the NCAA through the most transformative period in the organization’s more than 100-year history. Over the past decade, athletes have gained more power, advantage, and money-making ability than ever before. Amateurism has been redefined.

But Emmert was seen by some not as a catalyst for change, but as an obstacle in the way – or at least reactive instead of proactive.

“Throughout my tenure, I have emphasized the need to focus on the student-athlete experience and priorities,” Emmert said in an NCAA statement. “I am extremely proud of the work of the association over the past 12 years and especially pleased with the hard work and dedication of the national office staff here in Indianapolis.”

The announcement comes a year after the board approved a contract extension for Emmert through 2025, a move that has left many college sportsmen perplexed. Emmert’s annual salary was nearly $3 million.

The NCAA has suffered a string of damaging legal losses that culminated in last year’s 9-0 Supreme Court ruling against the association in an antitrust case. The decision undermined the NCAA’s ability to govern college sports and resulted in a complete overhaul of how it operates.

Years after losing an antitrust case over the NCAA’s use of athletes’ names, images and likenesses, the association finally changed its rules last June to allow athletes to profit as sponsors and paid endorsers. The move only came after state lawmakers passed laws to override the NCAA’s power, and with Congress unwilling to provide federal protection, the NCAA was unable to regulate NIL activity with uniform rules, which has drawn further criticism.

Emmert was named to the role in April 2010. He had led the University of Washington and LSU before taking over at Indianapolis.

NCAA revenue has grown to more than $1 billion a year under Emmert, mostly from television deals for the men’s college basketball tournament, with most of the money redistributed to more than 1,100 schools members with nearly 500,000 athletes.

Yet the disparity between what the wealthiest schools bring in versus what the vast majority of schools spend on athletics has made it difficult for all of them to coexist under one umbrella organization.

NCAA member schools adopted a new constitution in January and are “transforming the structure and mission to meet future needs.”

“With the significant transitions underway within college sports, the timing of this decision provides the association with consistent leadership over the coming months, as well as an opportunity to consider what the future role of the president will be,” said said DeGioia. “It also allows the next president to be selected and recruited without disruption.”

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Former India head coach Gary Kirsten wants England Test job | England cricket team https://work-fromhomee.com/former-india-head-coach-gary-kirsten-wants-england-test-job-england-cricket-team/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 15:08:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/former-india-head-coach-gary-kirsten-wants-england-test-job-england-cricket-team/ Gary Kirsten is likely to be shortlisted for the vacant England Test head coach job as Rob Key moves to make his first major appointment as manager of men’s cricket. A job that could be split in two by Test and white-ball cricket is expected to be officially announced in the coming days, but Key […]]]>

Gary Kirsten is likely to be shortlisted for the vacant England Test head coach job as Rob Key moves to make his first major appointment as manager of men’s cricket.

A job that could be split in two by Test and white-ball cricket is expected to be officially announced in the coming days, but Key has already started canvassing potential candidates since he started work last Tuesday.

Kirsten, the former India and South Africa head coach, missed out on the England job in 2019 to Chris Silverwood and has been bruised by a process that led to him slipping away for the UK believing it was at a loss. But those close to Kirsten say he remains keen on the challenge of turning England’s Testing fortunes around and, having had concerns about the demands of family life when the job was all-format, is heartened by the fact that the role could be divided.

Speaking of Kirsten in February when a Sky pundit Key said: “He probably would [be a good option as head coach]. He was obviously a decent player and he has a lot of international cricket experience so he’s used to that scrutiny and he coached India to world No 1 with [captain] Mrs Dhoni.

“What you sometimes have to figure out with these people is who was the real driver of this success that India has had. Was it MS Dhoni, was it Gary Kirsten? Did Gary Kirsten just facilitate MS Dhoni and all the awesome stuff about MS Dhoni and all the decisions? That’s what you need to find out.

Kirsten is the batting mentor for new franchise Gujarat Titans who are No. 1 in the Indian Premier League, but with England keen to find the right person for the team’s needs, a degree of flexibility on second jobs was not excluded.

There are others in the running, with former Australian hitter Simon Katich highly rated by Key after their recent stint commentating together in Pakistan. The 46-year-old is already working in England as the head coach of Manchester Originals, has knowledge of the county from his playing days and experience coaching in the IPL.

Although the separation of head coaching roles will reduce time spent on the road, candidates will still have to weigh their own commitments and the international cricketing lifestyle. Katich, for example, has a young family and is among a number of ex-players who relish the flexibility of combining commentary work with short-term franchise roles.

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Key is said to be optimistic about his options, with Graham Ford, the widely-traveled former Kent and Surrey manager, another linked name and Paul Collingwood, the interim head coach for both legs of the recent tour of the Caribbean, a candidate for the limited-overs job that backs Eoin Morgan as captain. Justin Langer, the former Australia head coach, is not considered a candidate. While Ben Stokes is also expected to take on the Test captaincy – provided Key is confident the all-rounder is ready to take on additional responsibilities after last year’s mental health break. reasons – a trickier task is to hire a new national coach.

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CSIS jobs in human resources are available and you do not need a university degree https://work-fromhomee.com/csis-jobs-in-human-resources-are-available-and-you-do-not-need-a-university-degree/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 07:17:47 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/csis-jobs-in-human-resources-are-available-and-you-do-not-need-a-university-degree/ There are jobs available at the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) in human resources that don’t even require a college degree and almost no experience required! With these jobs in the Government of Canada, CSIS is currently looking to fill the positions of Human Resources Advisor, Human Resources Assistant and Human Resources Officer. Anyone applying […]]]>

There are jobs available at the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) in human resources that don’t even require a college degree and almost no experience required!

With these jobs in the Government of Canada, CSIS is currently looking to fill the positions of Human Resources Advisor, Human Resources Assistant and Human Resources Officer.

Anyone applying is asked not to discuss their application with anyone other than their partner or close family members, but they should also be discreet.

Additionally, applicants must be eligible to receive an “Enhanced Top Secret” security clearance which involves a security interview, polygraph, and background investigation.

The Human Resources Advisor role is available in Ottawa, Toronto and Montreal and the salary is $73,970 to $89,970.

For the education requirement, you can meet it with an undergraduate degree, university or college certificate, or human resources certification recognized by the Canadian Council of Human Resources Association.

The only experience required is working within an HR team while providing advice and guidance in any HR discipline.

The Human Resources Assistant position is located in Ottawa and pays $57,960 to $70,500 per year.

You need an undergraduate degree, university certificate or college diploma or human resources certification recognized by the Canadian Council of Human Resources Associations.

Experience in human resources or administration when planning, organizing and coordinating activities or actions is required.

The Human Resources Officer position is based in Ottawa, Montreal and Toronto with an annual salary ranging from $65,460 to $79,640.

As with other jobs, you need an undergraduate degree, university or college certificate, or human resources certification recognized by the Canadian Council of Human Resources Associations.

The only experience required is in the application of human resources policies.

For these three CSIS jobs available in human resources, the last day to apply is April 27, 2022!

Human Resources Advisor

Salary: $73,970 to $89,970

Location: Ottawa, Montreal and Toronto

Who should apply: Someone with experience working within an HR team while providing advice and guidance in any HR discipline.

Apply here

Human Resources Assistant

Salary: $57,960 to $70,500

Location: Ottawa

Who should apply: Someone who has worked in human resources or administration and who has planned, organized and coordinated activities or actions.

Apply here

Human Resources Specialist

Salary: $65,460 to $79,640

Location: Ottawa, Montreal and Toronto

Who should apply: Someone with experience in applying human resource policies.

Apply here

The cover image of this article was used for illustrative purposes only.

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My life in Shanghai’s endless zero-Covid lockdown | China https://work-fromhomee.com/my-life-in-shanghais-endless-zero-covid-lockdown-china/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 00:40:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/my-life-in-shanghais-endless-zero-covid-lockdown-china/ SSomehow, after three weeks of quarantine, locked in my studio in Shanghai, while chopping the only remaining cucumber from the last package of government dinner supplies after browsing through an overwhelming amount of miserable lockdown experiences online and then having “gone” them, these four of Steve Jobs’ words popped into my head: stay hungry, stay […]]]>

SSomehow, after three weeks of quarantine, locked in my studio in Shanghai, while chopping the only remaining cucumber from the last package of government dinner supplies after browsing through an overwhelming amount of miserable lockdown experiences online and then having “gone” them, these four of Steve Jobs’ words popped into my head: stay hungry, stay stupid.

I feel like an unseen force is screaming these words into my ears, then screaming loud and clear in the sky above 26 million souls in this city; this solitary, motionless, empty, gigantic city that has known everything effervescent for the past 30 years.

Through my narrow kitchen window, an empty street in pre-lockdown Shanghai somehow resonates with my deep consciousness: memories of those wonderful years before 2019 seem so surreal that they escape me like stories from my past life.

To begin with, this is not my first quarantine, nor my second, nor even my third.

As one of the many Chinese who returned to China after years abroad in 2020 amid the Covid-19 outbreak, I have already learned and practiced the art of sitting quietly in a single piece repetitively and religiously over the past two years. I already have all the indoor fitness apps, audiobooks, streaming subscriptions, meditation apps, remote meeting apps of all kinds, and food delivery people I’m familiar with, and I thought to be able to dive into the fourth forties of my life with elegance without blinking, like a professional.

People line up for Covid-19 tests in a lockdown residential community in Shanghai, China. Photography: Alex Plavevski/EPA

It started off as a slow train. During the first week of March I was aware that some compounds were stuck here and there for several days due to a new wave of variant Omicron infections, but no one I personally know has yet been affected by the situation.

In the second week, everyone had a friend who was either locked in their office or locked in their compound. Memes and jokes began circulating on Chinese social media: “Those at work spend the day worrying if they can get home tonight, those at home spend the night worrying. worry if they can go to work the next morning”.

By mid-March, everyone knew for a fact that some sort of lockdown was about to happen. Offices began to close and people were gradually asked to work from home. The number of cases was still not part of the daily discussions, and nobody was really worried because… come on: everyone has a friend or a friend of a friend outside of China who has caught the Covid, s recovered and is having a lot of fun in his life now. Not from the media, not from politics, not even from scientific research, but someone who has been there whom they trust.

During the last week of March we finally realized we were in deep water and would be there for a long time. Restaurants are semi-closed for dining, chaotic hoarding scenes begin to become creative material for rap songs, and city officials eventually impose a full segment lockdown for 10 days. I reasonably hoarded food for 10 days, started downloading spiritual books and Buddhist classics for my mental well-being, and jotted down the daily plan on my whiteboard while making calls zoom to instant messaging apps while trying to focus on my writing.

“The situation has only gotten worse”

On the second day of full lockdown, I tried to walk around Meituan and Hema to buy coffee. With just a few clicks, my heart skipped a beat. Nothing was available anymore. From there, the rest is history.

The deeper I delve into the Shanghai lockdown, the more I realize I’ve just plunged into a black hole. The situation only got worse. I downloaded 30 more apps and added community service, woke up at 6am to clear my shopping list, but nothing helped. I had to realize that either the stock is running out or no one is there to deliver. It didn’t take me long to realize that everyone is in the same situation. Between friends, we reached a silent consensus: behind every smiley on WeChat at 6 a.m. hides a desperate resident of Shanghai.

‘This can’t last’: Locked-down Shanghai residents scream from balconies – video

On the sixth day, the expected release never materialized but real anxiety set in. A neighbor knocked on the door asking for rice. He’s 50, lives alone in the building next to me, and ran out of grain. I poured half my packet of rice into the pot in his hands and refused it when he insisted on paying me. As soon as I closed the door, I realized that the situation had reached a point where it was becoming difficult to obtain the bare necessities.

As the days go by, the food shortage becomes more and more serious. Like many who were unable to buy groceries online and received the bare minimum of government supplies, WeChat group buying was the only way forward. Due to the limited traffic on the streets and the high risk for delivery people during the confinement, only food orders above a certain price or amount could be given priority.

Group leader (团长) has quickly become a buzzword and a heroic role to play in Shanghai’s lockdown: you have to be resourceful, helpful and organized all at the same time. They usually launch a survey in the WeChat group, collect requests from neighbors, connect with food suppliers, pay in advance and distribute accordingly when supplies arrive.

Workers sort bags of vegetables to deliver to residents of Shanghai's Jing'an district
Workers sort bags of vegetables to be delivered to residents of Shanghai’s Jing’an district. Photograph: Héctor Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

I also started getting to know my neighbors better within days than I have in the past two years. I traded soy sauce for coffee with one neighbor and eggs for milk with another. I even started planning a “little” party for a girl upstairs who would turn 30 during this “no cake, no candles, no wine, no friends” lockdown, as she sarcastically described it.

Black markets also begin to emerge from the third week: Coca-Cola, instant noodles, dried mango and crisps are sold for two or three times their original price through a resident’s window. to the rest of the same corridor. The girl who owns “the little stand” is in contact with a food supplier who keeps his supermarket closed to the public.

The PCR test is the only opportunity to get out. We are asked to do these tests every three or four days, sometimes on short notice or very late at night. One way or another, most of us still feel lucky to be asked to take the test, because it’s the only way to get outside for a while and breathe some fresh air.

We are fortunate that the entire compound has remained negative so far. Infected people who test positive during group PCRs are asked to go to mobile medical offices (方舱) where patients are grouped together, separated from the “negative” world in Shanghai.

“It’s like packing bikinis for Siberia”

I learned later through the online WeChat log from a friend who was forced to go there after testing positive that he was sleeping in a gigantic open space where the lights are on 24/7. 7, and 10 toilets are shared between 2,000 people. “It’s like a night train with no destination in sight” – I remember this line from his online diary.

The past few weeks have been depressing enough as food anxiety slowly begins to drag people down, but the daily number of new infections continues to rise. The date of the initial release keeps getting longer. Uncertainty is starting to dominate people’s minds: are we going to get back to normal? Will the Wuhan model work for Shanghai?

We are now in a country that firmly adheres to zero tolerance, but cases are skyrocketing as high as at the start of the second wave in Europe. It’s like packing bikinis for Siberia, using chopsticks to eat a steak, teaching an eagle to swim: when extreme situations collide, tragedy happens.

Shanghai has always been the scene of drama in modern Chinese history and always will be in essence. The city is not only the country’s economic hub, but is also beloved for its vibrant middle class, diverse public life, open-minded intelligentsia, and active civil society (by Chinese standards).

The empty Humin elevated road in Shanghai
The empty Humin Elevated Road in Shanghai. Photography: VCG/Getty Images

Retired medical workers are beginning to offer alternatives to drastic measures and questioning the legitimacy of the zero-Covid policy; journalists begin to collect censored deaths due to inaccessible health care and strict PCR test results that lock patients out of emergency rooms; citizens begin to wonder how their beloved city has become a hell on earth with people starving and crying out for help. Anger and frustrations are beginning to dominate social media, with articles and videos being shared millions of times before being abruptly deleted or removed by censors.

An article titled “The people of Shanghai have reached the limit of their maximum tolerance” has been viewed 20 million times and miraculously made visible after being deleted by the authorities for the first time in Chinese Internet history, in due to the unprecedented attention of citizens.

I know that I am witnessing and living a once-in-a-lifetime experience: planned provision, barter economy, starvation, wartime anxiety and uncertainty.

Covid: inside Shanghai’s largest makeshift hospital – video

I’m also slowly starting to get more and more uncomfortable with the public narrative around ‘positive cases’: every building that had a positive case would have an additional 14 days of lockdown and several new PCR tests added, not to mention the fear of being sent to the mobile medical cabinet. This easily triggers public fear of “positive” cases and people.

For the past few days, neighbors have started denouncing each other in our WeChat group. Some days it was about who hadn’t had a PCR test, other times it was about who was trying to sneak in for food. At my friend’s compound, the neighbors even start calling the police when they see someone coming downstairs or talking in a group.

I can see the uncanny resemblance between being “positive/suspicious” today and being “intellectual/bourgeois” in the 1960s during the Cultural Revolution.

To be honest, it destabilizes me much more than hunger or Covid-19.

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Ukrainians can apply for jobs in Finland, but will they find them? | News https://work-fromhomee.com/ukrainians-can-apply-for-jobs-in-finland-but-will-they-find-them-news/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 14:19:47 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/ukrainians-can-apply-for-jobs-in-finland-but-will-they-find-them-news/ While authorities have moved quickly to ensure Ukrainian refugees can legally apply for work, questions remain about whether they will find secure, quality jobs that allow them to earn a living. Questions remain as to whether newcomers from the war-torn country will actually be able to land jobs in Finland. File photo from April 4, […]]]>

While authorities have moved quickly to ensure Ukrainian refugees can legally apply for work, questions remain about whether they will find secure, quality jobs that allow them to earn a living.

Questions remain as to whether newcomers from the war-torn country will actually be able to land jobs in Finland. File photo from April 4, 2022 of Ukrainians outside a reception center in Kuopio. Image: Sami Takkinen/Yle

Following Russia’s deadly invasion of Ukraine, tens of thousands of Ukrainians are expected to seek refuge in Finland, most of whom will be looking for work.

Yulia Shevchenko is one of them. She arrived in Helsinki with her five-year-old son a month ago, while her ex-husband, stepfather and grandfather all stayed in their native Kyiv to help with the war effort. She came to Finland because her brother lives here and was able to provide her with accommodation.

Shevchenko, 27, is “very happy and grateful” to have found safety in Finland, but now faces the stress of finding work as a foreigner with limited Finnish and English skills. She also fears that her previous Ukrainian qualifications will be of little use in Finland.

“I apply everywhere. Restaurants, cleaning, international companies. I need to find work quickly to support my son. It’s strange to have to start over like this,” she explained.

Ukrainians at a reception center in Mikkeli, Finland. Image: Esa Huuhko/Yle

“My Ukrainian diploma has no value here, and I would need completely new qualifications in Finland to resume my previous job,” she explained. Shevchenko is a qualified clinical psychologist who previously worked in dental administration.

Shevchenko added that although she is willing to do “any available work” to pay the bills, her efforts have yet to produce any job offers.

She receives a small allowance from the state and plans to one day become fluent in Finnish and graduate from a local university. In the meantime, Shevchenko has signed up for Finnish lessons online and is looking forward to lessons in real classrooms soon, so she can learn faster.

An inflexible labor market

A microwave in a visitor center room. Image: Jaana Polamo/Yle

Meanwhile, employment rates are even worse for those who originally came to the country as refugees. The cohorts of the wave of asylum seekers who entered Finland in 2015 – mainly of Syrian, Iraqi and Afghan origin – are much more likely (siirryt toiseen palveluun) unemployed than other foreign-born groups.

“If anything hinders Ukrainians’ ability to find jobs, it’s the rigidity of the Finnish labor market,” Silfver said. With her day job as a project manager at the Espoo City Employment Services, Silfver is well equipped to help Ukrainians navigate the local job market.

“We already know that employers are reluctant to hire someone who is not fluent enough in Finnish, even when there is no aspect of the job that requires Finnish proficiency. There is an urgent need for companies to be more flexible about this than they have been in the past,” she added.

Baggage belonging to Ukrainians who have moved into a reception centre. Image: Jaana Polamo/Yle

The association also noted that many newcomers do not speak English either, adding another “layer of disadvantage” they must contend with.

Ukrainians also face attempts to lure them into exploitative or dangerous work. Silfver said he noticed a series of online job ads in the Helsinki region calling for single women to perform unspecified tasks for an anonymous employer.

“For us, it looks like an attempt at forced prostitution or trafficking, so we are trying to get the ad taken down,” Silfver explained, adding that the fact that most ads are written in Ukrainian or Russian means that they fly under the radar of the Finnish authorities.

“These shady recruiting practices may seem obvious to some people, but when you’re fleeing war, you’re desperate and you can’t put food on the table, you’re much more likely to take risks.”

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Risk of wasted potential

Silfver says the majority of newcomers the association helps are well-educated and highly skilled, but they still might not find work that matches their experience.

“Most people arriving in Finland at the moment are educated, connected and skilled. We see nurses, teachers, graduates and vendors making up a significant portion of arrivals – all people Finland critically needs” , explained Silfver. .

Silfver also noted that the process of recognizing non-EU qualifications in Finland, especially in tightly regulated fields such as medicine and education, can usually take several months or even years.

Visitor center in Kuopio. Image: Sami Takkinen/Yle

For those wishing to enter the education and childcare sectors, a Finnish level of C1 is required before an applicant can even start a ‘bridge’ training to have their existing qualifications recognized in Finland.

“Given that most foreigners in Finland will find it difficult to get beyond the B1 level of Finnish, we are obviously concerned that these requirements will prevent many qualified Ukrainians from practicing their profession,” Silfver concluded.

New challenges, new opportunities

Susanna Piepponena senior labor ministry specialist who has been tasked with addressing labor market challenges for Ukrainians, said the demographics of this wave of refugees present unique challenges and opportunities.

Piepponen noted that the recent wave of arrivals presents a “very different picture from previous arrivals from, say, Somalia or Afghanistan, which were more likely to be male and less educated”, adding that there is a much stronger political consensus to integrate Ukrainians.

“The political will is much, much stronger than in 2015. There is a consensus in all political parties that the most important thing is to welcome Ukrainians and help them join Finnish society as soon as possible possible, which has not always been the case for refugees in the past”.

The ministry also estimates that the majority of arrivals are working-age women with university degrees, many of whom have young children. While this presents specific challenges related to childcare needs and increased risk of trafficking, the benefits for Finland of successfully integrating these newcomers into the labor market are also evident.

In front of a reception center in Kuopio. Image: Sami Takkinen/Yle

“We are not blind to the fact that many of these arrivals have skills that Finland really needs,” Piepponen said, noting that authorities have made unprecedented efforts to quickly integrate Ukrainians into the labor market, including speeding up the registration process.

With up to 80,000 Ukrainians expected to arrive this year, policymakers have recognized the need to quickly integrate them into the labor market. The Finnish Ministry of Economy and Employment has clearly stated (siirryt toiseen palveluun) that any Ukrainian arriving in the country will receive a work permit as soon as their application for residence is registered, in accordance with the European directive on temporary protection.

To do things well

Piepponen describes these recent moves as a “huge overnight change” for a country that is typically very demanding when it comes to documentation. While acknowledging that “major” changes in the regulation of professions would be needed to allow Ukrainian educators and nurses to work in their respective fields in Finland, she is optimistic that the country will eventually be able to integrate all newcomers to the labor market and to provide jobs that match their skills.

She added that the benefits of “getting this right” for Finland were significant, given the pressing labor shortages the country faces.

This sentiment was echoed by Silfver from the Association of Ukrainians, who added that the cost of failing to place newcomers in decent jobs was too high.

“If we don’t step in and get it right, we will have tens of thousands of people who have sought refuge here, finding themselves unable to contribute or live fulfilling lives.

Meanwhile, Yulia Shevchenko said she is aware of the challenges she faces in Finland, but also remains positive about the future.

“Everything is so crazy right now that it’s hard to think what the next five years will be like. I just want to enroll my son in kindergarten, improve my language skills, and hopefully work in a job where I can talk and help people,” adding that she hopes to use her previous training to provide psychological support to future arrivals from Ukraine.

“I always try to be optimistic. My background in psychology tells me that it’s probably just a defense mechanism, but I’ve also seen that people here are nice and very open to helping. I hope that I can also help”.

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