Jobs no experience – Work From Homee http://work-fromhomee.com/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 04:48:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://work-fromhomee.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png Jobs no experience – Work From Homee http://work-fromhomee.com/ 32 32 Sheldon Keefe after 3-0 win over Habs in pre-season: ‘Matt Murray looked excellent’ https://work-fromhomee.com/sheldon-keefe-after-3-0-win-over-habs-in-pre-season-matt-murray-looked-excellent/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 04:15:02 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/sheldon-keefe-after-3-0-win-over-habs-in-pre-season-matt-murray-looked-excellent/ Sheldon Keefe, Toronto Maple Leafs postgame Sheldon Keefe spoke to the media after his team’s 3-0 win over the Montreal Canadiens in Game 3 of the 2022-23 pre-season. Jordie Benn and Carl Dahlstrom injury updates: Benn has a groin injury and Dahlstrom has a shoulder injury. Both guys will be undergoing more testing tomorrow, so […]]]>
Sheldon Keefe, Toronto Maple Leafs postgame

Sheldon Keefe spoke to the media after his team’s 3-0 win over the Montreal Canadiens in Game 3 of the 2022-23 pre-season.


Jordie Benn and Carl Dahlstrom injury updates:

Benn has a groin injury and Dahlstrom has a shoulder injury. Both guys will be undergoing more testing tomorrow, so we’ll know more and get it to you once we get it. We don’t know the full extent of it yet, but both guys will run out of time. We’ll just have to see how many.

In terms of worry about accumulating injuries:

It sucks to see it happen as often as it has here. It seems like every day we have one or two guys falling. Some of them happened before the camp even started. It’s not a good thing, but it happens. It’s part of the game.

There are a lot of teams that go through it. Montreal is in a similar situation with a number of guys who are unavailable. We’re going to get through this and find out on these two guys tonight how much time they’re going to miss.

So far, nothing that’s happened is really long-term. I think we will overcome this. In the meantime, there are plenty of opportunities for guys.

It was another great performance for all of our guys today – the experienced guys who took over, defense with Rielly, Giordano, Mete and Brodie. These guys have taken over. Kerfoot and Jarnkrok came up there when I asked them to leave.

That’s the big lesson for me about the game: the way these guys went, did it, served the team and got the job done. Everyone else had to play further forward, move around and play in different positions. They just kept working. I thought we had a lot of good nights from a lot of people.

Why Jarnkrok and Kerfoot were the ones used in defense in a pinch:

When we lost Dahlstrom and went from five to four, there was a television downtime. There were about four minutes left. I spoke to Gio on the bench and said, ‘Can we skip those four minutes and then we’ll sort things out between periods?’ He was good with it. I think they were fine at that time. We succeeded in the first period.

It gave me some time to think about what I was going to do and how we were going to adjust. With these two players in particular, their skills and the fact that both players have experience playing in the middle… Playing low in the defensive zone is one of the biggest challenges of playing defense as well as defending out of the race. You can’t really do much against the rush, but the defensive zone is part of it both to defend there and to get out of that space.

I thought those guys would help us out there. In terms of general attitude and approach to the game, they are both selfless players. They are there to serve the team and do what they can to help. They didn’t hesitate at all when I told them they had to play defense for me. They went out and did a job.

In this game tonight, I think they are as complete as we are in terms of skills and experience. It made sense. I thought they had done an amazing job.

If he would insert forwards on defense in a regular season game if he only had four defensemen:

I don’t like to answer hypothetical questions, but in this case, I will answer. I think the obvious answer is that I might not put two. But you can’t do two periods with four defenders. That’s a lot to ask. We would definitely throw a striker there and mix it up like what we did tonight.

I guess that’s a positive thing that comes out of it. Now we got two guys, we feel pretty confident [about] and experience it. Like I said to Dean Chynoweth, maybe it’s not that hard after all to play there [laughs].

On Matt Murray and Ilya Samsonov, who have both kept a clean sheet in their 40-minute screenings so far:

It’s early and they’ve only played 40 minutes, but they can only cope with what’s coming their way. For me, they’ve been excellent – ​​from practices with Curtis Sanford, off-ice testing, training and preparation to play in pre-season – and they’ve answered any questions that have arisen. so far. They did a good job.

I thought Murray looked excellent today. It didn’t look like it was his first pre-season game. He looked sharp and focused. The guys played well in front of him, as they did for Samsonov.

I thought it was another good performance in the goalkeeping department today – with Kallgren, too, coming on for the final 20 minutes. He was also lively.

We have everything going on with all these injuries. The goalkeepers have been very solid for us from the start here. Obviously, we want this to continue.

If he remembers anything from Matt Murray’s training as a junior that gives him faith he’ll succeed in Toronto:

I have seen tremendous growth from him. I was hired around Christmas time mid-season in Sault Ste. Mary this season. I finished that season with him, came back and got him for another season. There was a difference in his growth after being really pushed, challenged, and reset. We also changed goalkeeper coaches over the summer that year.

For me, he was a different person and a different athlete in terms of focus, preparation and detail. He was the best goaltender in the OHL that year, in my opinion. He really didn’t look back after that. He went straight to the AHL, dominated, went to the NHL and won the Stanley Cup, and all that.

To answer the question, I have experience with him in that sense. I don’t know how much of a factor that was in this situation, but certainly, given that experience, it’s better than having no experience.

On Nick Roberton’s game and goal:

I thought it was a really good game for Nick today. He gets the goal early. It’s a nice goal on his part. It is really well placed. He doesn’t hesitate and shoots us.

You could tell he was starting to feel it a bit and maybe he was trying to do a little too much there. I talked to him about calming down and getting back to work. But I think it was a very good game from him tonight.

It was a great opportunity for these guys. It doesn’t reflect an NHL game or an NHL roster, but there are NHL players out there and you’re always looking for guys to stand out. Even for AHL guys, you’re playing in an NHL building. You got a big crowd here tonight. Everything is amplified. You are always looking for guys to part ways in this environment.

I thought Nick had a good game today, but I could go all the way. I thought Holmberg was once again really solid. We mentioned Steves. I thought McMann had his best day today. Joey Anderson.

I hate going through the list because it’s a big bunch of guys and I always leave out one or two. This forces us to make difficult decisions. It was really nice to see the progression from where we were a year ago with a lot of these guys to where they are now in their development: pushing and in conversation to make it difficult for us. It is really good. A lot of those guys will be leaving on Friday.

On the team’s power play tonight:

It was not very early; it was a bit slow and stagnant, but it got us a big second-half goal there. There were different times when it started to pick up the pace a bit with the puck. I think the third goal in the third period was a really good power play. We moved it well and performed the things we were trying to do.

At the pre-game ceremony celebrating the anniversary of the Canadian 1972 Summit Series team:

It was exceptional to see these gentlemen standing in the building this evening, proud of their country, their achievements and their heritage. Seeing this here for our organization and our fans – as well as the Montreal Canadiens and the NHL – and giving them this recognition on this day was incredible. I think we can all agree that it was special to be in the building and to share this moment with them.

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Monday Letters: Search for City Manager, Gun Development, Unemployment, Pro-Life Rally, etc. https://work-fromhomee.com/monday-letters-search-for-city-manager-gun-development-unemployment-pro-life-rally-etc/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/monday-letters-search-for-city-manager-gun-development-unemployment-pro-life-rally-etc/ Poor city governance Residents of Glenwood Springs: Your city council is a misdirected, dysfunctional, rudderless mess. Unable to decide import issues, they spend your taxes and their time raising our utility bills by hundreds of dollars, not fixing the streets, not fighting uncontrolled growth, trying to raise our taxes and shut down our airport, trying […]]]>

Poor city governance

Residents of Glenwood Springs: Your city council is a misdirected, dysfunctional, rudderless mess. Unable to decide import issues, they spend your taxes and their time raising our utility bills by hundreds of dollars, not fixing the streets, not fighting uncontrolled growth, trying to raise our taxes and shut down our airport, trying to shove a West Glenwood development down its throat and placing question after question on the ballot that we have to throw out in costly and unnecessary elections.

The latest debacle is the inability of this council to choose a new city manager, one of our most important responsibilities. After an exhaustive search, with dozens of applicants, a highly paid consultant, and hours and hours of interviews and meetings, this board rejected three qualified candidates. This was done in a very competitive job market, with no guarantee of better candidates. It’s short-sighted and irresponsible.

We had three acceptable candidates; now we have none and will have to spend thousands of dollars to find more candidates. The plan now? Raise a $210,000 salary even further with more bonuses, pay more than the former city manager was earning, hoping to attract someone new.



Faced with real issues — streets, infrastructure, the economy, jobs and uncontrollable growth — this ineffective council refuses to do the necessary work. Undirected and unmanaged, it prevaricates with nonsense, fails to solve real problems while simultaneously imposing absurd ideas and proposals on the people it claims to represent. It’s a real debacle.

Now, after spending $22,500 on a “headhunter,” this advice is going to spend $10,000 or more to do it again; money, as this advice often does, thrown away. It’s not governance; it is petulance. We have important work to do. But, like any elected body, we have limited time and resources. Spending that time and resources on nonsense without addressing the real issues facing GWS and solving them is not governing. It is negligence.



Tony HersheyMember of Glenwood Springs City Council

Eco-Friendly Opposed Rifle Housing

A petition with signatures was submitted to Rifle City Council on September 18. She explains why the signatories are against Eco Dwelling’s proposed housing development on West 16th Street and the upper animal shelter area. This beautiful open space is a green area, wildlife habitat and wetlands, which was verified by Perry Will on September 7, during a walk on site.

We want to know if there has been an environmental impact study conducted on schools, traffic or crime. What about the water resources and contributions of Colorado Parks and Wildlife on their section of this property? The more water used here, the less there is downstream. Where do you draw the line?

Rifle is about to lose our small town Western lifestyle that we are known for. We are becoming a mini Glenwood. As citizens of the Rifle area, we don’t want to experience the growing pains of Glenwood Springs. Their city is at a breaking point with excessive traffic, a shortage of affordable housing and a loss of quality of life.

A survey should be conducted by the city to ask citizens if a $250,000 to $300,000, 900 sq. ft. house, 10 feet from their neighbors, is affordable and desirable? Plus, being built in a high density neighborhood close to Railroad Avenue. The city approved the additional 60 new units of Kings Crown Trailer Parks and 62 of Upper Pioneer Mesa. Now Eco Dwelling wants 204 for a total of 326 new units.

If the City of Rifle can buy Goat Island next to Lion’s Park and the rest area, then they can buy that land from Eco Dwelling and preserve it for future generations to enjoy in its natural state.

Save this quaint little valley and remember that we are all on a one-way journey through life. If there is a good deed to be done, let it be done now.

Harold MartinezMusket

too many houses

As a resident of Rifle, I oppose the annexation of a high density home project on West 16th by Eco Dwelling – 58 units on top of the hill and 65 below. Each unit is only 900 square feet.

It is a wetland and a wildlife sanctuary. Do not bother him by introducing a “human infestation”. This ecosystem has been maintained for decades. It will force all life out and onto the streets to find refuge from destruction. Our community will be unbalanced!

The high school is at the top and there are three ways to enter the school; two are in this street. A study in April reported 10,317 cars over a seven-day period. The city council has been instructed to build a speed bump to slow down motorists. No action has been taken as the council cannot decide where the city and county boundaries are. Council declared this street west of Howard Avenue to be a county road. The Rifle Police are unable to enforce the speed limit as it is outside their jurisdiction. So, who will monitor this area? Without law enforcement, there will be anarchy, and who will pay for it? The rifle community.

The road will need to be upgraded to accommodate increased traffic. I ask that an impact study be done and that the results be communicated to the population. Include the number of trips within and outside the region. Are there any laws that are violated, such as how many people per square foot of living space is allowed? This area will be flooded with noise and vehicles, with no open space, decreasing the quality of life.

We are the last pioneers in this valley, and we will be swindled out of our public lands; our rights trampled on by a Florida company seeking to financially gain on our core values ​​passed down to us by our ancestors.

Our constitutional rights are protected and forged by our state union. There will be regrets once the realization of this annexation hits our humble and peaceful community. What are we going to give up for this uncontrolled growth? Consider the rights of neighbors, family and friends who live here, not an out-of-state corporation. Do not allow this project!

Dan KsiazekMusket

Lots of jobs

I saw the article that Garfield County has 928 people collecting unemployment. I can only assume it’s because they’re not actively looking for a job. Everywhere I go, businesses are understaffed and cutting services, opening hours, etc.

It is not just one aspect of the employment sector that is short of manpower. Food service, customer service, health care, administration — that’s everyone. Where I work, we have 31 vacancies, 17 of which require no experience; we are going to practice. And our starting minimum wage is $20 an hour.

With all the vacancies in the valley, why are there people collecting unemployment? If there is something I don’t see, please let me know.

Molli DeinesMusket

40 days for life returns

You are invited. On September 28, life takes center stage as we begin the second 40 Days for Life campaign in Glenwood Springs. The centerpiece of the campaign is a peaceful, non-political vigil on the public sidewalk outside the Planned Parenthood Clinic near the Glenwood Springs Mall. Please join us as we pray and advocate for the lives of innocent children as we did in the spring of 2022. We estimate that between 150 and 200 pro-lifers were on the sidewalk at least once in March and april.

What have they been through? A strong consensus for life, as supporters stopped to talk, pray and hold our signs. They brought us coffee, snacks and meals. They participated in in-depth discussions on the value and science of life. Ideas were exchanged and new friendships blossomed. Cheers, thumbs up and other expressions of support poured in from many passers-by.

Oh, we also heard from dissenters. But, their response to the vigil was quite different. Few pro-choice activists have stopped to discuss the issue. Of the handful that did, only two were interested in a civil discussion. Others have been stonewalling, using arguments that don’t match what modern science or the Bible says about the beginnings of life. When it was our turn to speak, they either moved away or spoke above us. The driving opposition appeared angry for the most part, simply shouting insults or displaying gestures of disapproval.

Judging by the 40 Day Spring Vigil and balancing supporters with dissenters, the Glenwood community favors life as a whole, by a factor of three or four to one! The campaign returns this fall to continue the discussion, welcoming everyone to the sidewalk in the spirit of love, peace and civility.

We know that unplanned pregnancies create challenges for those affected. In response, we provide access to prenatal and postnatal care, adoption support and financial resources. We respect everyone, even those who would make a choice different from ours. Please join the discussion as we seek to heal our community’s division on this issue.

Michel Kaddatzcampaign leader of Glenwood, Eagle

Rethinking the search for a city manager

My dad was the city manager of a town of 20,000 that also had a power utility (a great asset). Finding the right candidate for the position of city manager is neither that complex nor that difficult.

A CM should be just that: a manager of departments with a council and a mayor who guide (not political pressure). Most CMs quit because of stressful treatment from the board, not a lack of support from employees or the public. I don’t know the Glenwood Springs City Council so this shouldn’t be read as a negative. If the board can come together on the type of candidate to better serve the community with the maintenance and improvement of infrastructure, then this process should be successful in terms of performance and job satisfaction.

A 10 second search with my browser found the average CM salary around $150,000, $180,000 max depending on experience. Throwing money at the position will not attract the right candidates.

Look for someone who wants to be here (or is here) rather than a stepping stone to the next big city.

Dan MooreGlenwood Springs

Tyrannical property right

Our ancestors believed in “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”.

We came to our vacant lot in unincorporated Eagle County (in the middle of nowhere and no HOA) to install a septic tank this summer in order to build a cabin next spring. Eagle County bureaucrats have informed us at gunpoint that you cannot have an RV or camp more than five days on your own property in Eagle County.

Wow, that’s new. When was this tyrannical law passed? Wasn’t that here ten years ago?

The Guardian recently reported that more than a quarter of American residents feel so estranged from their government that they think it may “soon be necessary to take up arms” against it.

Sandy and Lee MulcahyBasalt

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Getting Started Stories: Creating Diagnostic Tools for Sickle Cell Disease https://work-fromhomee.com/getting-started-stories-creating-diagnostic-tools-for-sickle-cell-disease/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 15:47:22 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/getting-started-stories-creating-diagnostic-tools-for-sickle-cell-disease/ In this series, Karen Guzman talks to students and former entrepreneurs about how they are making an impact with their startups. Company: KovaDx is building a point-of-care monitoring device for rare blood diseases, starting with sickle cell disease. Using proprietary 3D phase imaging microscopy and deep learning algorithms, the company aims to reduce hospitalizations by […]]]>

In this series, Karen Guzman talks to students and former entrepreneurs about how they are making an impact with their startups.

Company: KovaDx is building a point-of-care monitoring device for rare blood diseases, starting with sickle cell disease. Using proprietary 3D phase imaging microscopy and deep learning algorithms, the company aims to reduce hospitalizations by preventing serious episodes through routine monitoring and informed care.

Founders: Song Kim ’20; Yaw Ansong Jnr, physician and scientist; Tim Adamson ’22

When did you get the idea for this startup?

KovaDx was inspired by Yaw’s work as a doctor in Ghana. He treated children he suspected of having sickle cell disease (SCD), but since their parents could not afford to be diagnosed, he simply did what he could to lessen the symptoms. In the United States, we have learned that diagnoses of SCD are universally made at birth. However, there has been underinvestment, both at individual and systemic levels, which has impeded progress in improving care.

We have recognized this with our skills—Yaw with his clinical and research experience; Tim with his IT expertise; and me with my background in program management – we could expand access to services by creating a new kind of business that uses innovative technology to transform the way SCD is treated.

What is the problem you are trying to solve or the gap you are trying to fill?

Sickle cell disease is a global health problem that has a significant impact on the length and quality of life. It is a genetic disease that makes red blood cells hard, sticky and sickle-shaped and leads to serious problems throughout the body including infection, excruciating pain, loss of vision, chronic organ damage, stroke brain and premature death. It affects 30 million people worldwide. In the United States, where 1 in 18 black Americans carry the trait, individuals have a life expectancy 34 years less than that of the average American. The average cost of treatment has been estimated at over $34,000 per year. Yet despite its prevalence, sickle cell disease remains one of the least well-funded diseases. Lack of funding translates into a lack of research and investment in health infrastructure, widening the already existing health gap between races.

What has been the most important resource that Yale SOM has brought to your startup?

Prior to SOM, I was an attorney providing services to marginalized immigrant communities. I had little business experience. Honestly, I hadn’t used a single formula in Excel until my first accounting class. Needless to say, everything I learned in the courses – from basic courses like sourcing and fund management to social entrepreneurship courses – helped me think about what it means to launch a sustainable startup with a mission of social impact.

Another of the most important resources provided by SOM is the network I tapped into every step of the way. From finding key advisors aligned with our values ​​to helping me understand the nuances of the incredibly complex and fragmented healthcare system, I couldn’t have done it without friends, teachers and alumni. who generously offered their support.

What is the biggest milestone your startup has taken since graduating?

We set out to build a point-of-care monitoring tool that can measure patients’ blood health in real time. While this can be applied and customized to a number of diseases, we are obviously excited about our initial application as it will be the first point-of-care tool capable of measuring the blood health of people living with SCD. To put into perspective how transformative this would be, think of the impact glucometers have had on diabetic patients! Our next steps are to test our device and models in a clinical setting.

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Analysis: Elite Wall Street bank gets a $35 million lesson: Just call tech support https://work-fromhomee.com/analysis-elite-wall-street-bank-gets-a-35-million-lesson-just-call-tech-support/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 00:12:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/analysis-elite-wall-street-bank-gets-a-35-million-lesson-just-call-tech-support/ Here’s the deal: Morgan Stanley was just fined $35 million for “astonishing” failures that led to the mishandling of sensitive data on some 15 million customers, writes my colleague Matt Egan. The mistake? Throw away old computers without erasing hard drives. In an episode described by the Securities and Exchange Commission, Morgan Stanley hired a […]]]>
Here’s the deal: Morgan Stanley was just fined $35 million for “astonishing” failures that led to the mishandling of sensitive data on some 15 million customers, writes my colleague Matt Egan.

The mistake? Throw away old computers without erasing hard drives.

In an episode described by the Securities and Exchange Commission, Morgan Stanley hired a removal company – which had “no experience or expertise” in destroying data – to decommission thousands of hard drives and servers containing the customer data.

This company then sold thousands of these devices, some of which contained personally identifying information, to a third party. Eventually, the devices, still laden with sensitive data, ended up on an auction site.

The SEC didn’t mince words in exposing Morgan Stanley’s missteps.

His “failures in this matter are astonishing,” Gurbir Grewal, director of the SEC’s Enforcement Division, said in a statement. “If not properly protected, this sensitive information can end up in the wrong hands and have disastrous consequences for investors.”

So yeah, that was pretty dumb. But it’s important to note that the SEC is not alleging anything criminal. did happen, just that Could have.

Morgan Stanley agreed to pay the fine without admitting or denying the settlement’s findings.

“We have already notified affected customers of these issues, which occurred several years ago, and we have not detected any unauthorized access or misuse of customers’ personal information,” Morgan Stanley said in a statement.

Another way of saying this is this: we were lucky and no bad actors managed to exploit the data that we carelessly leaked to the public, as far as we know.

Free advice for next time, y’all: call tech support! We can all be Luddites, guys – there’s nothing to be ashamed of.

NUMBER OF DAYS: 45,000

We’re three quarters into 2022, and the hangover of 2020 is still hampering the auto industry.

Here’s the deal: Ford is now stuck with no less than 45,000 large pickup trucks and SUVs that it can’t finish because, well, it doesn’t have all the parts… ring fencing? It should, because it’s been going on for over two years.

The company warned late Monday that supply shortages and rising prices will cost it an additional $1 billion this quarter. Ford shares fell 12% on Tuesday.

THE R-WORD

The $25 trillion question of the year was a variation on a) are we in a recession yet? and b) how bad will it be?

We had a really fun to try to explain why the US isn’t technically in a recession right now, even after two straight quarters of negative growth. ICYMI: This oft-quoted guideline has a lot of caveats and is not a hard and fast rule. And anyone looking at the current labor market, with near-record unemployment, as well as resilient consumer spending, wouldn’t logically call it a recession.

This does not mean that the fears have disappeared.

Take FedEx, which led a sell-off late last week when it cut its forecast and warned of a global slowdown. He is not alone. Earlier this month, the CEO of luxury home goods retailer RH (aka Restoration Hardware) said “anyone who thinks we’re not in a recession is crazy” and added that the housing market is in a slowdown that “has only just begun”. Best Buy’s CFO avoided the R-word, but used the kind of business jargon – “current trends in the macro environment could be even more difficult” – that amounts to a wake-up call.

Chip equipment leader Applied Materials had other euphemisms to scare off investors last month, saying some of its customers are in slowdown mode “as macro uncertainty and weakness in large electronics public and PCs are pushing these companies to postpone certain orders”.

These are worrying signs, reports my colleague Paul R. La Monica. And there’s likely more to come as companies gear up for the third-quarter earnings season next month.

Analysts and companies are already cutting their outlook, suggesting the third quarter could be the worst for earnings since 2020, when the pandemic crippled the economy.

So yeah, it’s not great. But it’s not bad at 2008 levels. And there’s a potential upside, says Paul. The housing market looks set to slow rather than collapse following the 07-08 subprime mortgage crisis.

Do you like the nightcap? Register and you’ll get all of this, plus other fun internet stuff we’ve loved, delivered to your inbox every night. (OK, most nights – we believe in a four-day work week here.)
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Niles graduate’s work is an adventurous endeavor | News, Sports, Jobs https://work-fromhomee.com/niles-graduates-work-is-an-adventurous-endeavor-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 05:28:09 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/niles-graduates-work-is-an-adventurous-endeavor-news-sports-jobs/ RJ Markowitz is hiking in Ketchikan, Alaska on a June delayed honeymoon with his wife, Carlye. Markowitz is Adventure Recreation Coordinator at Youngstown State University’s Andrews Student Recreation and Wellness Center HUBBARD — If you’re at Youngstown State University’s Andrews Student Recreation and Wellness Center during the week, you’ll see Adventure […]]]>

RJ Markowitz is hiking in Ketchikan, Alaska on a June delayed honeymoon with his wife, Carlye. Markowitz is Adventure Recreation Coordinator at Youngstown State University’s Andrews Student Recreation and Wellness Center

HUBBARD — If you’re at Youngstown State University’s Andrews Student Recreation and Wellness Center during the week, you’ll see Adventure Recreation Coordinator RJ Markowitz instructing students on the wall of climbing 53 feet high.

It also lends the gear they need to navigate it, as well as tents, kayaks, paddles, and life jackets for backpacking or hiking trips.

When Markowitz graduated from Niles McKinley High School in 2006, he left for the University of Akron to major in e-marketing and advertising. Little did he know that the hobbies he chose on this campus would lead to his career.

His childhood excursions kindled the embers of his interest in outdoor sports.

“Cycling was something I loved. It was my grandfather who pushed me to do this. He chose it as a hobby at age 65. Every time we came to visit him, he would take us for bike rides in the Cleveland Metroparks and he would make sure we had the helmets and gear we needed. said Markowitz.

While studying at UA, he had the opportunity to borrow camping gear and other equipment, which piqued his interest in these activities.

“The first time I went backpacking was me and a roommate. I remember the coyotes howling coming closer and closer to the tents and hurting me because I had packed too much. C It was an “aha moment” that I enjoy, but I have to improve and be smarter on these trips. I saw it as a challenge to improve on something I really loved and make it more pleasant “, said Markowitz.

The original backpacking friend evolved into a party of five on these trips, but their first forays into the woods left something to be desired.

“We all met at the honors dorm. I remember using borrowed material. We used trash bags as rain covers and wore work boots. Our equipment evolved as we graduated and got real jobs. We still get together twice a year to go camping,” he said.

He decided Akron was not right for him or his education goals, so he transferred to YSU.

“At that moment, I knew that I really liked the story. I liked to write. I thought maybe I could teach that,” said Markowitz.

He graduated with an undergraduate degree in middle school education in 2012. While teaching, he discovered that a traditional school setting was not for him.

“I walked into the classroom and started working with kids, and I was like, ‘I don’t think this is for me.’ I had some great experiences, so that’s when I decided to get my master’s degree in counseling with a focus on higher education,” he said.

During his graduate studies, he did not give up his involvement in adventure activities.

“I was still doing all those outdoor activities – biking, hiking and kayaking,” he said.

Luckily for Markowitz, his two main interests in higher education and his hobbies converged on his future job destination.

“That’s when all these pieces started coming together for me in grad school. YSU had a similar equipment loan program like Akron. I asked my advisor if I could do an internship at the leisure centre, said Markowitz.

The timing was in his favor.

“I loved this thing. I was going to higher education and was thinking of becoming a counselor. The principal offered me an internship. I passed, and it turns out that a position opened up a year after graduating, he said about the fortuitous event.

Four months after completing his master’s degree in October 2015, he was offered the chance to work temporarily at the recreation center as an adventure recreation coordinator. After a year, he was offered a permanent job.

“It’s fun to participate in adventure sports and help students enjoy these activities,” he said.

Yet Markowitz sees a different aspect of his work as the most important.

“Even though I have a passion for the outdoors, I will put that above all else, my passion for student development. Seeing these students who have little or no experience in this field, hiring them and really seeing them grow and flourish and knowing that I played a small part in that is great. These are also the relationships you build. Graduates stay in touch,” he said.

Even during the COVID-19 pandemic, Markowitz has found a way for students to be part of a community.

“I was one of the first programs to go to YSU. I said, ‘These students don’t have anything to do. They’re just sitting here and depressed. I’ve developed a safe way to s’ engage outside. They wore masks. We limited the number of people attending. They socially distanced and we met at Mill Creek Park and hiked,” he said.

Markowitz has found the perfect balance in his position at YSU. He can pursue his adventurous hobbies while using his upbringing to instruct and help students grow in a non-traditional setting.

He and his wife, Carlye, tied the knot in October 2020 during the pandemic in their backyard and via Zoom. They took a delayed honeymoon cruise to Alaska in June, where they went hiking.



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Apple’s ‘Ted Lasso’ Wins Two Emmy Awards for Outstanding Comedy Series https://work-fromhomee.com/apples-ted-lasso-wins-two-emmy-awards-for-outstanding-comedy-series/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 08:13:40 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/apples-ted-lasso-wins-two-emmy-awards-for-outstanding-comedy-series/ September 13, 2022 PRESS RELEASE Apple’s global phenomenon “Ted Lasso” joins the ranks of history’s most famous comedies with back-to-back Emmy wins for Outstanding Comedy Series at the 74th Primetime Emmy Awards ‘Ted Lasso’ Becomes Most Emmy-Awarded Comedy Again Apple TV+ lands nine Emmys in total, including four wins for “Ted Lasso” and honors for […]]]> ]]> DAWANG celebrates modern chinoiserie – Daily Trojan https://work-fromhomee.com/dawang-celebrates-modern-chinoiserie-daily-trojan/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 07:55:17 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/dawang-celebrates-modern-chinoiserie-daily-trojan/ Daisy Jingwen Wang founded DAWANG in 2018 to create authentic fusions of Western and Eastern fashion. While the nickname is a portmanteau of his name, it is also 大王 (dàwáng) – the great king in Chinese. (Photo courtesy of DAWANG/Astrid Ji Photography) The intertwining of cultural elements, especially in fashion, has long been problematic in […]]]>
Daisy Jingwen Wang founded DAWANG in 2018 to create authentic fusions of Western and Eastern fashion. While the nickname is a portmanteau of his name, it is also 大王 (dàwáng) – the great king in Chinese. (Photo courtesy of DAWANG/Astrid Ji Photography)

The intertwining of cultural elements, especially in fashion, has long been problematic in America. The line between appropriation and appreciation can be stark for designers looking to celebrate their overlap, especially when big corporations so frequently cannibalize traditional clothing with no respect or input from their cultures.

As difficult as it may be to toe that line, DAWANG struts fearlessly on the tightrope.

DAWANG, a New York-based contemporary streetwear brand, has been dedicated to honoring and modernizing Chinese aesthetics since its inception in 2018. Founder Jingwen Wang – whom her friends call her Daisy – has long loved fashion, but never hadn’t chosen a creative direction until his final project before graduating from The New School’s Parsons School of Design.

“My senior thesis was in 2017, and it was my first mini collection on how I wanted to interpret modern Chinese,” Wang said. “After that, I was heading towards graduation and I was like, ‘I’m not sure what I’m doing; I know how to design, I know how to make clothes, but I don’t know how to express my aesthetic, my culture, to others.

To hone this skill, Wang spent a fifth year at Parsons to pursue a minor in fashion studies, specifically seeking to develop her understanding of streetwear subcultures. Studying the hype around brands like Supreme, Wang saw parallels to the growing popularity of Asian culture in the city around her.

“When I came here in 2013, we had a boba store within 20 blocks of Manhattan. And when I graduated from Parsons, we had about 10 different boba stores within a 20-block radius. We feel that Asian culture, our food, everything is becoming more and more accepted and becoming mainstream… so why not fashion.

Studying the qipao, a garment dating back to the 16th-century Qing dynasty, Wang continued to observe the combination of Eastern and Western design, but was frustrated by a perceived imbalance between how Chinese and American cultures accepted each other.

“As a Chinese [person]I didn’t even know specifically that our qipao was a mixture of West and East – it was the representation of early 20th century Chinese people starting to accept Western culture, starting to think “Oh, we don’t have not to hide all of our body parts, we can show a little skin, we can open the slits a little bit’… From that point of view, I was like, ‘Wow, look how western we are now… if we can accept western culture in such a large volume, why can’t western culture accept us?”

Wang describes this struggle to create clothing that authentically accepts and celebrates the combination of Chinese and American design elements, as a driving intention behind her work on DAWANG.

“I want to show people from all cultural backgrounds what modern Chinese can be, how we can appreciate each other’s culture as long as you know what we’re talking about. But it’s still a problem, a line that we’re slowly trying to remove, that people say ‘Why are you wearing our stuff? Do you appreciate it? Or are you just, you know, finding it as a costume? … we want to represent modern Chinese in [more of] a lifestyle, more streetwear, more accessible.

A model fanning herself with a large gray feather poses in a patchwork DAWANG shirt against a red background.
The DAWANG collection includes qipaos, a Chinese garment whose roots date back to the 16th century. As the DAWANG website explains, “the qipao is more than a dress – it’s a symbol of versatility, resilience, and growth.” (Photo courtesy of DAWANG/Gu Yuenai)

In just four years, Wang’s brand has built a prominent reputation on the Chinese scenes in New York and Los Angeles, with a polished online presence one would expect from such a young designer. On the DAWANG website, with beautiful velvets and shiny patchwork, blog posts on the history of qipao and brocade.

Journalism graduate Julia Lin spent about a year helping Wang with these blog posts, but was first introduced to DAWANG when she was looking for an article that matched Wang’s vision. His mother, Judge Tana Lin, who became the first Asian-American federal judge in Washington state after being sworn in last December, was looking to “make a statement” during her Senate nomination hearings with a bespoke suit.

“[My mom] wanted to represent Chinese Americans because she was the first in our state to hold that position. And so I just DMed Daisy, and I was like, ‘Hey, like, here’s the situation,’ and Daisy was super excited about it,” Lin said.

Lin’s work with Wang revolved around the “storytelling” aspects of DAWANG – blog posts and a social media presence that further describe the brand’s mission. While she found the experience rewarding in many ways, it particularly resonated with Wang’s aspirations behind her designs.

“Work with [Daisy] was a great opportunity for me,” Lin said. “I’m obviously passionate about the Asian American experience and representing our culture. I feel like you don’t see that in the media, you don’t necessarily see it in fashion, the way Daisy does it. Or if you do, it’s not by an Asian designer, or there’s some kind of weird cultural appropriation innuendo. So to work directly with Daisy and help her tell what these clothes mean to her and how she wants them to be accessible to everyone has been really cool.

A model in a DAWANG top poses in a green velvet curtain.
(Photo courtesy of DAWANG/@aaarkam)

While the brand remains modest in size for now, fans in Wang’s circles and beyond have expressed their appreciation for DAWANG’s work.

“I really love seeing a refreshed look on Chinese-inspired clothes and clothes,” said Annalee Swagerman, a freshman at The New School. “I know some of the work is in older styles from mainland China, but it’s really nice to see an urban take on older styles.

Most valuable to her, Wang describes receiving immense support from New York’s Asian community around her work — and not just from other designers. Founders and makers of everything from seltzers to authors have offered Wang advice, collaboration, and even home-cooked meals based on their shared interest in representation.

“Because I’m building a startup that’s tied to our culture, I have the opportunity to meet many different founders – within the industry or not – who work towards much the same goal: to celebrate Asian cultural aesthetics. …everyone has been so supportive, even though we are from different countries like Korea, China, Japan, but here we feel like we belong together, like we belong to one community.

Wang said that sense of belonging has been particularly important during the rise in anti-Asian hatred in recent years. Although appalled by the prevalence of such racism in America, Wang credits the celebratory intent of her work and that of others as helping her find peace — a sentiment shared by fans.

“Coming from someone who is Asian and has been hated for our culture, to see it urbanized and really appreciated and celebrated and brought back…it’s really exciting,” Swagerman said. “I really like what they are doing as an Asian person.”

Even beyond its roots in the Chinese-American community, DAWANG has much to contribute to the cultural exchange trend.

“I think what DAWANG has to offer is a really fresh perspective on what it means to wear and share their culture,” Lin said. “Especially in mainstream fashion, often when you see designs made by Asian Americans, it’s more traditional clothing or it’s this qipao style, but taken by big companies – like PrettyLittleThing or a boohoo – and done in a way where the story and cultural sensitivity are lacking. But for Daisy, I think she brings a unique, honest, and youthful point of view.

A model in a DAWANG outfit poses against a white background on a city rooftop.
(Photo courtesy of DAWANG/Casper Yen)

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A third of police officers have less than 5 years on the job as experienced police officers quit en masse | United Kingdom | New https://work-fromhomee.com/a-third-of-police-officers-have-less-than-5-years-on-the-job-as-experienced-police-officers-quit-en-masse-united-kingdom-new/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 21:01:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/a-third-of-police-officers-have-less-than-5-years-on-the-job-as-experienced-police-officers-quit-en-masse-united-kingdom-new/ More than 43,000 of England and Wales’ 140,000 police officers have less than five years on the job, new Constabulary Chief Inspector Andy Cooke has revealed. He said the large number of recruits is the result of a campaign by the Home Office to face a minimum of 126,300 full-time officers in 2019. Another 20,000 […]]]>

More than 43,000 of England and Wales’ 140,000 police officers have less than five years on the job, new Constabulary Chief Inspector Andy Cooke has revealed. He said the large number of recruits is the result of a campaign by the Home Office to face a minimum of 126,300 full-time officers in 2019.

Another 20,000 are to be recruited by next year to fill the voids left by the experienced officers who are leaving.

Mr Cooke said inexperienced staff needed “intensive” supervision from the elderly at a time of soaring serious crime rates.

As a result, offenses such as burglary, car crime, shoplifting and even robbery are often not properly investigated. Mr Cooke revealed: “Thirty-one per cent (43,471) are under five years old and of these, 27 per cent (11,737) are under one year old.

“There is a national shortage of detectives. We now have direct entry detectives, but they are young and inexperienced, and in the short term this will continue to be a problem.

In a report on the matter, Mr Cooke wrote: ‘Many newly trained or direct entry detectives carry out large numbers of investigations without any experience in making arrests, building cases or appearing in court.’

There are fears that more experienced staff will leave due to low pay and morale. A Police Federation survey of more than 57,000 members of the organization found that almost 18% were actively seeking new careers and 50% were considering leaving.

Federation National Chairman Steve Hartshorn said: “Many have been forced out of the service they are passionate about, and many more are considering joining because they simply cannot afford to continue their policing careers.

“It is sad to see the forces losing talented and experienced officers and disturbing to witness this at a time when we aim to recruit more to better protect the public.”

A Home Office spokesperson said: ‘It is clear that such an unprecedented increase in recruitment is bringing a high number of new officers into the police force. Experienced officers are incredibly valuable, which is why we also work closely with forces to manage the retention and progression of existing officers.

Court backlog puts justice on hold

Victims of crime are waiting years for offenders to face justice due to a backlog in Crown Courts. More than 500 trials have been delayed for more than two years, campaign group Fair Trials has revealed.

The judicial blockage has increased to 61,000 cases thanks to the Covid. And it could get worse, with lawyers now striking for more pay.

Alan Collins of Hugh James Solicitors said: ‘Delay, of course, has a corrosive effect as memories fade, witnesses may not remember, let alone still be there to testify. There is also the psychological pressure on everyone involved.

More than 500 defendants have been in pre-trial detention for more than two years, while the maximum should be six months.

The Justice Department said judges “have prioritized remand cases following the impact of the pandemic.”

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Learning Company Euan Blair Obtains License to Award Degrees | Learnings https://work-fromhomee.com/learning-company-euan-blair-obtains-license-to-award-degrees-learnings/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 15:01:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/learning-company-euan-blair-obtains-license-to-award-degrees-learnings/ Tony Blair was the Prime Minister who achieved his goal of enrolling more than half of all young people in higher education by this century. Now his son is pioneering a way to award degrees without the need for a university or college. Euan Blair’s company, Multiverse, has become the first learning provider to be […]]]>

Tony Blair was the Prime Minister who achieved his goal of enrolling more than half of all young people in higher education by this century. Now his son is pioneering a way to award degrees without the need for a university or college.

Euan Blair’s company, Multiverse, has become the first learning provider to be licensed to award on-the-job degrees.

Multiverse will be able to award degrees in subjects such as data science and technology, with all learning being taught on the job through apprenticeships.

The first cohort of 170 people will enroll in Multiverse Degrees this month, and about double that number is expected to begin when applications for 16-24 year olds open later this year.

They will train alongside full-time jobs with partner companies such as Rolls-Royce, Travis Perkins, Mastercard and Trainline.

Training will be free, meaning there will be no student debt, a big selling point as the cost of living soars.

Last year, Dyson became the first company licensed by the Office for Students to award on-the-job degrees, but Multiverse is the first learning provider to do so. The Student Office is currently reviewing applications from other providers.

Writing on LinkedIn on Thursday morning, Euan Blair said the moment was a “huge step forward” for the company.

“From today, we have the power to issue our own degrees. It’s no small feat: it’s a rigorous and detailed process that started some time ago and is backed by inspections and audits from a host of government regulators.

The new credentials allow the educational technology company to issue certificates up to bachelor’s degree level to those who complete their programs.

Blair said: “Unlike a traditional college degree, it will mean what you can do, not just what you know. It is completely free for the individual, fully paid for by employers, with no debt or deferred income. You are paid a salary throughout the process because it is ultimately a job, so you don’t need to try your luck in what is likely to be an increasingly difficult job market.

“These powers give us another powerful tool to open up an academic-only education system and fundamentally transform who has access to the best careers. Apprentices start in the UK this month, and I couldn’t be more excited.

Multiverse works with over 8,000 apprentices and was founded by Blair junior in 2016 to match those without a college degree with employer-paid jobs and training.

It was valued at $1.7bn (£1.4bn) in July this year when it sought additional investment. The company intends to use the new round of funding to expand its business in the United States as well as expand its range of tuition programs.

Elisabeth Barrett, vice president of learning at Multiverse, said the program was more inclusive than traditional college-bound learnings. “In university degree courses, only 12% of 19-24 year olds come from the most disadvantaged neighborhoods. Among those under 19, graduate apprentices are more than five times more likely to come from the most privileged neighbourhoods.

In contrast, Barrett said that more than a third of apprentices placed by Multiverse so far were experiencing “one or more indicators of socio-economic disadvantage”.

Jean Arnold, director of quality at SFO, said all applications for degree-awarding powers should be tested for factors such as their academic governance, experience and standards.

Arnold added: “We support innovation in the sector to improve course options and quality for students. We are pleased to grant degree-awarding powers to Multiverse as a provider that provides opportunities and choices for students.

This article was last modified on September 1, 2022. An earlier version stated that Tony Blair “has achieved his goal of enrolling more than half of all young people in college”; it should have referred to higher education.

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CVCC and industry team up to create furniture academies https://work-fromhomee.com/cvcc-and-industry-team-up-to-create-furniture-academies/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/cvcc-and-industry-team-up-to-create-furniture-academies/ Share this story @CatawbaValleyCC Furniture Academies are leading the way for more collaborative programs to emerge. The academies are industry-focused – ensuring students receive quality training for high-demand jobs. “We have been able to turn around and offer programming that is both relative and sustainable. We’re listening. That’s what we do.” @cvccled shares how @CatawbaValleyCC […]]]>

Share this story

  • @CatawbaValleyCC Furniture Academies are leading the way for more collaborative programs to emerge. The academies are industry-focused – ensuring students receive quality training for high-demand jobs.

  • “We have been able to turn around and offer programming that is both relative and sustainable. We’re listening. That’s what we do.” @cvccled shares how @CatawbaValleyCC transformed a program.

Tyon Propst is meticulous – carefully laying the dust cover over the ottoman he is upholstering. He enjoys being creative and takes pride in the work he produces.

For Propst, attending Furniture Academy at Catawba Valley Community College (CVCC) is a chance to achieve her professional and personal goals. He called the training profitable and said he continued to learn and be challenged even though he had extensive experience in furniture making.

The Furniture Academy is a hands-on training program that prepares students for high-demand jobs in manufacturing – a sector that accounted for 22.2% of total employment in Catawba Valley service areas from 2019 to 2020.

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With two locations in Catawba and Alexander counties, the program has more than 40 supporting partners, many of whom are furniture manufacturers.

This is a unique collaboration between the college and industry leaders.

Although they are competitors, the founding industry partners of both sites have come together to create a program that prepares students for skilled positions that are in high demand.

Students take a variety of courses ranging from furniture fundamentals to sewing to upholstery. And in eight to 11 months, they’re ready for the next step in their career with salaries ranging from $30,000 to $60,000.

Those who go through the academies enroll for a variety of reasons. For some, it’s a direct route to higher salaries. For others, it is an opportunity to improve and train. There are students in the program with advanced degrees who want hands-on experience to take their work to the next level.

Furniture academies have also welcomed students from careers spanning decades who need a change.

More than 350 students have graduated since the program’s inception in 2014, and it has a 100% employment rate. But the impact of the furniture academies does not stop there. The academy model has opened the doors to more collaborative partnerships to meet the growing needs of the community.

Video made by Michelle Lotker for EducationNC in March 2021.

The rebirth of a training center

Manufacturing is the largest employer in the Catawba Valley service area. According to a 2021 Economic Impact Study of North Carolina Community Colleges, the industry supported 27,428 jobs in Alexander and Catawba counties from 2019 to 2020.

For years, Catawba Valley offered a furniture-making program that educated students and responded to industry demands. But in the early 2010s, manufacturing CEOs told CVCC President Dr. Garrett Hinshaw that the program was no longer providing the training and skills their employees needed. Hinshaw made the decision to suspend the program in 2012.

The break gave college and industry leaders an opportunity to rethink their partnership.

In 2014, CVCC opened the doors of its first furniture academy located a few kilometers from the main campus. The college and its five founding industry partners (Century Furniture, Lee Industries, Lexington Home Brands, Sherrill Furniture and Vanguard Furniture) collaborated to create a program that would train students for secure jobs and meet the labor demands of the community.

In 2016, the college opened a second furniture academy in Alexander County with three founding industry partners: Craftmaster Furniture, Kincaid Furniture, and Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams.

The CVCC is the hub of the program, but the training itself is industry-led – with experts in the field filling instructor roles.

Ronnie Wilcox and Davashia Woods are instructors for the academy and both work in furniture making.

Wilcox has over 25 years of experience. He teaches because he knows how difficult it is to progress without quality training.

“I know where they come from – I’m trying to start [in the industry],” he said. “It’s rewarding for me to teach these guys…give back a little.”

Woods is an academy product and said it helped jump-start his career.

“You start at the bottom – don’t make a lot of money, try to figure out what you can do to support your family,” he said. “It took me from where I was to where I am now. It’s a good job – it pays off… it’s challenging… it’s rewarding.

The students think so too.

Hunter Hall comes from a family of furniture.

Hunter Hall, student at the CVCC Furniture Academy. Emily Thomas/EducationNC

“It’s already in my blood,” he said.

For Hall, the program is the next step to maximizing his education for better opportunities, but it’s also a chance to improve himself. Hall and his classmates are proud of the work they produce and say they appreciate an environment that allows them to be hands-on.

The academic environment makes a difference for many students who may be intimidated by the thought of returning to school. It is primarily a hands-on program and works in buildings that look a lot like furniture manufacturing facilities.

“It’s a much more supportive atmosphere,” said Gary Muller, CVCC’s executive dean of economic development and corporate training.

“Since 2014, 100% of graduates from our furniture academies have been employed in the field,” Hinshaw said.

College leaders said the numbers are a testament to the collaborative effort and thanked Hinshaw for his leadership and bringing industry leaders to the table.

“Catawba Valley Community College realized several years ago that we needed to change the way we do business, so we sat down with the leaders of the major manufacturing sector here in this area,” Hinshaw said. “We have been able to turn around and offer programming that is both relative and sustainable. We’re listening. This is what we do.”

A collaborative approach

Although furniture manufacturing is the largest employer in the Catawba Valley region, it is not the only industry in need of skilled employees.

After launching two furniture academies, the college established additional academies, including careers in construction, hospitality, maintenance technology, and marine engineering technology.

Like furniture academies, these programs train or retrain employees with the skilled skills needed to advance their careers. They also help employers hire people from within the community.

It is a model that has gained state and national recognition.

People from across the United States have been calling — even visiting some of the academies — hoping to better understand how they can start something similar.

Cindy Fulbright, Catawba Valley Furniture Academy project manager, said the lack of support from business partners often prevents others from replicating something like Furniture Academy.

“Our business partners have trusted us. They donate funds, they donate scholarships, they donate materials, they donate time to meet all of our needs,” Fulbright said. “And they are a leader in what makes this academy what She is.

“We need experts at the table because things change so quickly,” said Tammy Muller, executive director of strategic business partnerships for CVCC and SkillsUSA.

While the college listens to business and industry, it also listens to students about their academic goals. Academies can be a pathway to future accreditation, if students choose this option.

“A lot of students come in and they don’t think they can do this,” Fulbright said. “When they succeed [the curriculum] and moving into the lab area…it changes their lives, their self-esteem and who they are.

“Education is one of the most essential tools we have to break the cycles,” said Randall Burns, CVCC SEnior general manager of corporate and economic development. “It impacts their children and future generations.”

Emily Thomas

Emily Thomas is a policy analyst for EducationNC.

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