Jobs no experience – Work From Homee http://work-fromhomee.com/ Wed, 05 May 2021 02:10:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.1 https://work-fromhomee.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png Jobs no experience – Work From Homee http://work-fromhomee.com/ 32 32 Women lost $ 800 billion last year https://work-fromhomee.com/women-lost-800-billion-last-year/ https://work-fromhomee.com/women-lost-800-billion-last-year/#respond Wed, 05 May 2021 02:00:35 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/women-lost-800-billion-last-year/ Photo caption: Getty Getty Tet Salva, a program manager at a high-tech company in the San Francisco Bay Area, was invited to share her experience during the pandemic as a working mother of four daughters to an audience of 2,000 leaders on her workplace. She decided to be honest about the challenges she was facing, […]]]>


Tet Salva, a program manager at a high-tech company in the San Francisco Bay Area, was invited to share her experience during the pandemic as a working mother of four daughters to an audience of 2,000 leaders on her workplace.

She decided to be honest about the challenges she was facing, with the goal of letting other working parents know that they were not alone. Salva shared the push-pull she felt as she walked a tightrope from childbirth to labor at the same high level she always had, while also dealing with the increasing demands at home with the closures of the ‘school. Her eight-year-old daughter’s anxiety and depression escalated during the pandemic. (The impact of the pandemic on children’s mental health is still under study, but a recent survey in Germany, around one in three children suffers from anxiety or depression linked to a pandemic).

“A particular episode with my daughter happened just before a meeting that I was facilitating,” says Salva. “I still remember where she was under my desk, crying. I held her hand, trying to calm her down. But the work doesn’t stop, right? Feeling completely torn, I said, “Okay, mom has to go to the meeting now.”

After sharing her story, Salva said the number of positive emails and notes she had received from public leaders was “overwhelming.” “I didn’t know it was going to affect them so much, but it had a negative impact on me after I shared this story,” says Salva. “I was asking for more challenges and higher level work, and the response was basically, ‘You have so much on your plate already’. I wanted to make this decision for myself, because the work is the place where I can be “me” and have some influence on the production. The goals kept changing on my plans, and it got to the point that I could no longer share my caregiving responsibilities for fear of negative reactions. Prejudice is still alive and well for caregivers in the workplace. “

The issue is close to the heart of Salva, who uses her voice as a woman of color, immigrant and caregiver to amplify caregivers in the workplace – especially caregivers of color – through community, mentoring and conferences. as founder of MomWarrior.

Today, May 5 is Equal Pay Mothers Day, and the stigma and discrimination is evident on a large scale when we look at the data on the pay gap: Mothers working full time. year-round away from home receive 75 cents for every dollar paid to fathers, depending on the National Center for Women’s Rights. The gap widens based on race and ethnicity: Latin mothers receive 46 cents for every dollar paid to non-Hispanic white fathers; Native American mothers are paid 50 cents; Black mothers are paid 52 cents; and non-Hispanic white mothers are paid 71 cents.

Additionally, mothers make up a disproportionate share of core Covid workers, but they are only paid a fraction of what fathers are paid to do the same job. More than one in four people working as home health aides, orderlies and licensed practical nurses are mothers, and nearly two-thirds of those mothers are mothers of color.

“This data is from 2019, the last year we have, so we don’t yet know how the pandemic will manifest itself in terms of the mother’s pay gap,” says Emily Martin, vice president of education and health. workplace justice at the National Women’s Law Center. “It’s possible that the pay gap could even be narrowing from a data perspective, because so many jobs were lost and so many low-paid workers were suddenly taken out of the equation. There were a lot of challenges for the women, but especially for the mothers. Not only have we hit a recession with significant job losses – and particularly significant job losses in occupations where women are overrepresented – but our entire care infrastructure has exploded with about three days. All costs related to child care are costs that women continue to bear disproportionately in private, and this has an impact on the gender pay gap and women’s economic security.

Covid is costing women around the world more than $ 800 billion in lost revenue in a year. “The pandemic has hit black and Latin women the hardest,” says Reshma Saujani, Founder and CEO of Girls Who Code and organizer of The Marshall Plan for mothers, which rolls out the Mother’s Day campaign “Mum deserves more than a flower shop” and sells a “pay gap bouquetPriced at $ 15,000 – the average annual amount lost due to the mother’s wage gap.

“Black and Latin women act as the primary or sole breadwinner of their families at higher rates than white women, and we know that closures due to a pandemic are hitting economic sectors that disproportionately employ them,” said Saujani. “We need to adopt policy changes that help them get back on their feet now. But we need to do more than pass new laws – we need to fundamentally change the way we value mothers’ work in this country. We need a cultural change that recognizes and rewards moms for the unpaid and invisible work they do every day. “

Women’s unpaid work helps support the global economy. In fact, an Oxfam report estimates that the value of the time women spend in unpaid care work is worth $ 10 trillion to the global economy each year.

“Caregiving is work that has been done primarily by women,” says Martin. “When it was done for money, it was mostly done by women of color. It has been undervalued and seen as something natural that you do out of love, rather than having a broader economic value that requires skills that should be paid for. The pandemic has made it more indisputable than ever that this is not just a private family problem; it is a national problem that requires a national solution. It is not only the well-being of parents and children at stake, but also the well-being of our economy and the health of our nation. “

Until the policy change catches up, men can better support women at home by taking on caregiving duties as well. “A big step forward would be for men to step in and help reframe the notion that caregiving is not just women’s job, but also their job,” says Salva. When it comes to the workplace, Salva believes that one of the main root causes of the pay gap is lack of access to opportunities. “For leaders who can influence real change, just open the door, give us a chance and give us that access,” she says. “Also, focus on mentoring women who have left the workforce to help them come back.”

Businesses can also step in to support caregivers during the pandemic and beyond. “It is always the responsibility of caregivers, as opposed to our employers or the government, to speak up and ask for a change or time off to care for us and our families,” says Salva. “I hope that will change. For example, LinkedIn recently gave employees a week off to completely unplug without email to help reduce pandemic burnout. If more companies started doing things like this I think you would see a more loyal workforce that will really come forward for you because you have come forward for them.



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Biden’s 100-day strategy: under-promise and over-delivery https://work-fromhomee.com/bidens-100-day-strategy-under-promise-and-over-delivery/ https://work-fromhomee.com/bidens-100-day-strategy-under-promise-and-over-delivery/#respond Thu, 29 Apr 2021 04:04:20 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/bidens-100-day-strategy-under-promise-and-over-delivery/ “I came to talk about crisis and opportunity.” So began President Joe Biden’s first address to Congress on the 100th day of his presidency. So far, the brand of the Biden presidency has been clear: under-promise and over-delivery. In December, President-elect Biden announced that in his first 100 days in office, Americans would be administered […]]]>


“I came to talk about crisis and opportunity.”

So began President Joe Biden’s first address to Congress on the 100th day of his presidency. So far, the brand of the Biden presidency has been clear: under-promise and over-delivery. In December, President-elect Biden announced that in his first 100 days in office, Americans would be administered 100 million shots. At the time, it seemed like a dangerous announcement, perhaps downright insane. By March, America had achieved that goal, and by the time Biden made his first speech to Congress at the end of his first 100 days, he could report that more than 220 million strokes had been administered. “Tonight I can say that thanks to you Americans, this vaccine has been one of the best logistical achievements this country has ever seen.”

Biden’s accomplishment stands in stark contrast to his predecessor who often did the exact opposite: too promising and underperforming. By October 2020, when the coronavirus was raging, Trump said he would be gone no less than 38 times!

As vaccines rise, COVID deaths decline, and Americans return to some semblance of normalcy, two questions arise: What’s the secret sauce so far? Can Biden continue like this?

The strategy so far has been to speak quietly and infrequently and spend time solving problems. This is not typical of the modern presidency. As political scientist Sam Kernell has shown, over the past few decades, US presidents have spent a lot of time talking and traveling, often to the detriment of government.[1] In his first 100 days, the White House Biden appears to have broken that habit. By focusing on governance, Biden takes the presidential model back to an earlier time when problem-solving mattered. Perhaps this change is driven in part by preference and in part because the traveling presidency is hampered by COVID restrictions. Either way, the contrast with Trump couldn’t be more stark. As Andrea Risotto explained in a recent article, Biden is content to let the surrogates carry the burden of messaging. He doesn’t feel like he has to dominate the news every day, and when he speaks it is to announce something he has done.

The secret sauce is then that Biden really knows how to rule. His experience contrasts sharply with that of his predecessor who had no experience of governance, but it also contrasts with the other two.st presidents of the century whose federal government experience was slim compared to Biden’s. Behind Biden’s victory lap lies skill.

For example, faced with a huge demand for COVID vaccines, Biden signed two executive orders early on citing the Defense Production Act. These orders were critical to the ability of vaccine manufacturers to obtain the raw materials and machinery needed to expand vaccine production.

Faced with another different crisis of asylum seekers on the southern border (many of whom are children), Biden entrusted his vice president with the task of addressing the root causes of migration: chaos, poverty and dysfunction. in the countries of the Northern Triangle. He asked federal workers to come to the border and help HHS look after the children there. His budget request to Congress asks for money to hire additional staff to deal with the huge backlog of immigration cases. This approach takes advantage of the government’s ability to expand its ability to solve a problem.

Faced with the relentless crisis of police violence against people of color, Biden’s attorney general has opened so-called ‘model or practice’ investigations in two police departments across the country – with the promise more to come.

Faced with a climate crisis that requires action beyond US borders, Biden enlisted former Senator and Secretary of State John Kerry to persuade the world that the United States is once again committed to reducing greenhouse gases. greenhouse and summoned world leaders to discuss what more could be done.

But as successful as the first 100 days were, Biden has his work cut out for him. The pandemic and the desire to end it gave him the opportunity to pass a massive bailout bill. In his wake, he outlined two other huge bills: the US plan for jobs and the US plan for families. They are expensive, totaling $ 3.8 trillion. Already, powerful senators like Joe Manchin (D-WV) balk at the price. And Republican senators have returned to worry about deficits, after four years on vacation after such criticism.

To push through these proposals, Biden has at least two strategies. First, he wants the rich and powerful to pay more. “Wall Street did not build this country,” he said tonight, “the middle class and the unions did.” As part of his plan to pay off much of his new spending, Biden announced he would seek $ 80 billion in additional funding for the IRS so they can check more tax returns for people earning more. of $ 400,000 per year. Over the past decade, IRS audit staff has declined, as has the total number of taxpayer audits. And audits of high income earners have declined much more as audits of low-income workers. Like my colleague Bill Galston points out in WSJ editorialIt almost sounds too good to be true, but if wealthier individuals faced audits, the government could recoup much of the change – enough to help fund Biden’s next round of proposals.

And second, his plan emphasizes American jobs – jobs that will go exactly to those displaced by globalization. In perhaps the most powerful statement of the evening, Biden said, “All investments in the US Jobs Plan will be guided by one principle: buy American… US public money will be used to buy American goods and create American jobs. ” And he announced that even before the legislation was passed, he had limited his cabinet’s ability to offer exemptions from the US purchase mandate.

We are witnessing a very different presidency from what we have had in recent years. Like others before him, Biden has big plans. But it has the depth and breadth of experience to make it happen. Or at least that’s what we saw in those first 100 days.


[1] See the excellent analysis in Going public: new presidential leadership strategies.



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We hire! | Itawamba Times https://work-fromhomee.com/we-hire-itawamba-times/ https://work-fromhomee.com/we-hire-itawamba-times/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/we-hire-itawamba-times/ As the number of COVID begins to drop and people begin to resettle as before the pandemic, a new problem has emerged that most did not see coming. Businesses across the country are struggling to find employees. After going through closures, quarantines, and then switching to curbside and online-only sales plans, businesses are now shutting […]]]>


As the number of COVID begins to drop and people begin to resettle as before the pandemic, a new problem has emerged that most did not see coming.

Businesses across the country are struggling to find employees. After going through closures, quarantines, and then switching to curbside and online-only sales plans, businesses are now shutting down because they can’t find anyone willing to manage the registry.

According to the most recent monthly labor market data released by the Mississippi Department of Employment Security, as the seasonally adjusted number of non-farm jobs in Mississippi increased by 3,400 during the month, the numbers were still down 33,800 on the year. Seasonally adjusted data take into account seasonal influences such as holidays, weather influences, and the start and end of the school year.

Mississippi’s unadjusted non-farm employment figures were up 5,500 from February, but are still down 34,100 from this period last year.

With most of the population now eligible for vaccination, employers are racing to plan their transition to full power. Which means that many jobs that were put on hold at the height of the pandemic are once again vacant. In many cases, employers must create new positions to meet the sudden demand from customers who are not wasting time returning to stores and restaurants now that occupancy and mask restrictions have been lifted.

“We’ve managed to retain about 80% of the original crew we started with in 2019,” Jason Beachum, owner / operator of local Guy’s Place on the Water hot spot told The Times. “We are recruiting for new positions because our staff are increasingly in demand now that people are leaving the office.”

Beachum explained what he believes has been the key to minimizing staff turnover.

“We pay well,” Beachum said. “Our servers are paid above minimum wage and they keep 100% of their tips. They’re full-time, so they know that even if they have a slow evening on tips, they’ll still have a full check to wait for. “

Beachum added that one of the biggest challenges it faces right now is a shortage of supplies.

“Restaurants are coming under fire now that everything is reopening,” Beachum said. “We are struggling to get consistent and reliable shipments, and we have to scramble to find other sources.”

Across town, Sonic Drive-In also struggles to stay full.

Melissa Dunn has been the General Manager of Sonic’s Fulton site for eight years now. It started as a caravan twenty years ago and has worked its way up the ranks. Dunn told The Times that in twenty years she had never seen a situation as bad as this.

Dunn said that after the latest round of stimulus checks and an increased extension of unemployment, employees have stopped showing up for work and are not even showing up to apply.

“We had stacks of apps. It started before the coronavirus hit, but it has worsened since then, ”Dunn told The Times.

Dunn said potential employees look at compensation, but also the work environment and flexible working hours.

“We work with people during their working hours,” Dunn said. “We try to maintain a good atmosphere where people like to come to work.”

Paul Dorn, director of operations at Sonic Drive-In, added that it’s not just a local issue, but something they see across the board. Dorn also said it’s not just entry-level employees that are scarce, but all levels, including senior positions.

Dunn and Dorn say they’ve increased the starting salary, even for those with no experience, to $ 5 an hour. Dunn added that car shops brought in between $ 50 and $ 100 in tips per shift.

As well as competing with stimulus and unemployment checks, Dunn says they’re also competing with new companies like Jack’s and, very soon, Taco Bell for employees.

Itawamba County’s unadjusted unemployment rate was 5.1 percent for March, 1.2 percentage points lower than Mississippi’s 6.3 percent. Only seven counties in Mississippi rank higher.

Tishomingo County to the north also had an unemployment rate of 5.1%, while Monroe County to the south was 6.1%.

Itawamba County Development Board Director Vaunita Martin told The Times that a total of eight new businesses opened in Itawamba County just before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Another problem that employers face is the loss of workforce. In addition to competition from new employers, Mississippi’s unadjusted workforce has fallen by more than 15,000 since March 2020. Itawamba County’s workforce was 10,360 potential employees as of March 2021, or 90 less than in February and 230 less than in March. from 2020.

According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the civilian workforce is the sum of all people employed or seeking employment. To be considered an employee, one or more of the following criteria must be met:

  • They worked at least 1 hour as a paid employee.
  • They worked at least 1 hour in their own business, profession, trade or farm.
  • They were temporarily absent from their work, business or farm, whether or not they were paid for free time.
  • They worked without pay for at least 15 hours in a business or farm owned by a family member.

Programs that involve volunteer work, unpaid internships, jury duty, unpaid training, National Guard or Reserve duties, or helping someone in their home do not count as employment. .

Those who are considered unemployed met one or more of the following criteria:

  • They were not employed during the survey reference week.
  • They were available for work during the survey reference week, except in the event of temporary illness.
  • They made at least a specific and active effort to find a job during the 4-week period ending with the survey reference week or they were temporarily laid off and expected to be called back. employment.

The most recent census shows that Mississippi has lost nearly 6,000 residents over the past decade, despite the fact that the South as a whole has shown the strongest growth in the entire country.

In March, Mississippi had 24,947 initial UI claims and 128,098 continuing benefit claims that paid out a total of $ 13,513,759. Compared with February, which had 39,614 initial claims and 136,429 continued to pay $ 12,298,864. As of March 2020, there were 60,097 initial requests and 55,357 continued requests.

Dorn told The Times he was not sure what the next step would be if they didn’t start filling positions.



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Norm Chow thinks Zach Wilson’s success is good for Aaron Roderick’s future https://work-fromhomee.com/norm-chow-thinks-zach-wilsons-success-is-good-for-aaron-rodericks-future/ https://work-fromhomee.com/norm-chow-thinks-zach-wilsons-success-is-good-for-aaron-rodericks-future/#respond Tue, 27 Apr 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/norm-chow-thinks-zach-wilsons-success-is-good-for-aaron-rodericks-future/ Zach Wilson’s makeshift splash also gets the others a bit soaked. And if Aaron Roderick isn’t a little drenched, well, he should be. When a college quarterback becomes a high draft pick, the coach is cheered. This is certainly the case with current BYU offensive coordinator Roderick, who was Wilson’s passing coordinator. It certainly came […]]]>


Zach Wilson’s makeshift splash also gets the others a bit soaked. And if Aaron Roderick isn’t a little drenched, well, he should be.

When a college quarterback becomes a high draft pick, the coach is cheered.

This is certainly the case with current BYU offensive coordinator Roderick, who was Wilson’s passing coordinator.

It certainly came in handy for Jeff Grimes, who left BYU at the end of Wilson’s junior year to secure his first offensive coordinator position in a Power Five program.

It certainly helped Mike Holmgren’s resume working with Steve Young and Robbie Bosco at BYU. Holmgren then continued his coaching career in the NFL when he left Provo in 1985.

After Norm Chow worked with Jim McMahon, Steve Young, Robbie Bosco, and Ty Detmer, he turned that into jobs in North Carolina State, USC, Tennessee Titans, UCLA, Utah and Hawaii. It didn’t hurt that his BYU work was duplicated with other Heisman winners Carson Palmer and Matt Leinart.

You got the idea.

Work with a first round pick like Wilson, and the magical dust rubs off on the others.

Over the past several months, Roderick has spoken to representatives from every NFL team. Whatever contacts he had before, they had just been reaffirmed or added.

And that can’t hurt things. Not for Roderick, not for BYU if he stays and uses his experience to recruit.

Does anyone remember what happened to Urban Meyer after Alex Smith was selected No.1 in 2005, and his career rise after winning the Utah Sugar Bowl?

I’m not saying Roderick is preparing to leave like Grimes did, but after this week Roderick’s professional reputation has taken on a bit of shine.

“Well that sure doesn’t hurt,” said Chow, who now lives in Southern California.

“I guess if you want to profit from it, you will. I don’t know what Aaron’s motivations or plans are or if he wants to capitalize on furthering his individual career, but it wouldn’t hurt. This experience gives you a lot more contact in the NFL because the Boy Scouts will call you and want your advice. “

Chow said the calls Roderick was getting – like the ones he had received – were not about the X’s and O’s or whether Wilson could read and attack a blanket pattern. “It’s more questions about the quarterback’s personality, his work ethic, if he can take coaching and how he handles pressure and prepares.

Chow said there’s no question that when you coach talent that earns Heismans, All-America honors or is drafted high, a coach can convert that into more money at that school or into a new job.

Chow did.

It’s not so sure that BYU has ever sued coaches for money. He still has cards from then-athletic director Glen Tuckett, written in his famous all-caps handwriting at the end of each year, telling him he’s sorry he couldn’t get him more money.

Chow was in Provo a week ago to see his grandchildren and visited Tuckett. The subject of these annual cards was brought up and they had a good laugh.

He and his wife Diane believed that since leaving BYU, their personal wealth had increased 100% in 10 years.

“I don’t know if things have changed at BYU, they’ve always been pretty tight,” Chow said. “Maybe yes, maybe not, but there’s no question that if a person wants to use their success with NFL selections and contacts to make more money, after an experience like this, this can be done if you wish. to make the switch and search for offers. “

Chow left BYU 21 years ago. Coach salaries have since benefited from the creation of what is called the “Coaching Circle”, a legacy donor fund and conduits to deep pockets.

Chow said he believes Roderick’s work with the BYU attack, his call to play, his development of the Cougars passing game, and his work as a QB whisperer with Wilson have been underestimated by many.

“He did a great job last season and from what I’ve been told he played a big part in what happened for sure,” said Chow.





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Why some Washington restaurants face a labor shortage https://work-fromhomee.com/why-some-washington-restaurants-face-a-labor-shortage/ https://work-fromhomee.com/why-some-washington-restaurants-face-a-labor-shortage/#respond Tue, 27 Apr 2021 02:07:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/why-some-washington-restaurants-face-a-labor-shortage/ Just as diners are finally coming back, many Washington restaurants cannot find employees to serve them. BURLINGTON, Wash. – Financial comeback is finally on track at Burlington’s Railroad pub and pizza. The customers, eager for normality, occupy the seats. There is only one problem. “We’re just looking for someone who wants to work,” pub owner […]]]>


Just as diners are finally coming back, many Washington restaurants cannot find employees to serve them.

BURLINGTON, Wash. – Financial comeback is finally on track at Burlington’s Railroad pub and pizza. The customers, eager for normality, occupy the seats.

There is only one problem.

“We’re just looking for someone who wants to work,” pub owner Nick Crandall said.

Washington’s hospitality industry lost 140,000 jobs during the pandemic and less than 40% of those workers returned.

Crandall is at least 10 people between the pub and the neighbor Train Wreck Bar & Grill, which he also owns. He was forced to hire people with no experience, while considering paying them more to encourage them to re-enter the labor market.

But it creates an unwanted ripple effect.

“We have meetings to increase the pay scale, but then the price of food and alcohol for the customer is going to go up,” Crandall said. “Everything is up. People have to pay more, so they have to earn more.”

The shortage is fueled by some former restaurant workers who are finding new, more stable careers. Others have returned to school.

Crandall believes the extra $ 300 in weekly federal unemployment benefits is largely to blame.

“How can you keep giving extra unemployment? I don’t blame people for taking it. The government gives them extra money. Why would they want to go back to work? They make more money by staying at home, but something has to give, ”Crandall said.

According to Department of Employment Security economist Anneliese Vance-Sherman, there is a lot more involvement, as people decide when and when to return to work.

“We have seen a lot of instability. There are constraints on the availability of child care services. Online or hybrid schooling has an impact if people are available for work. There is the virus itself, as well as concerns about his own health and that of his family. “

Vance-Sherman said one thing that would likely push people back into the labor pool is to reinstate the requirement for people to look for work in order to collect unemployment benefits.

Governor Jay Inslee has not been told when this could happen.

All of this comes as tulip season is in full bloom in Skagit County. In a typical year, tulips and tourists bring Skagit Valley over $ 60 million. It’s like Christmas shopping season for restaurants and other small businesses nearby.

RELATED: Peak Bloom: A Sneak Peek of the 2021 Skagit Valley Tulip Festival

Too few restaurant workers could mean long waits and less business, reducing desperately needed profits.

Then there are still concerns about a possible return to phase 2 in Skagit County, with a resumption of coronavirus cases.

RELATED: Skagit County May Return to Phase 2 If COVID-19 Trends Continue to Rise

It’s yet another hub for virus-weary restaurants like Railroad Pub & Pizza.

“I can’t go back anymore,” Crandall said. “We just have to keep riding and whatever happens it happens.”

RELATED: Washington Opens Window On Indoor Dining With New ‘Outdoor’ Rules



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Firms should stop favoring expatriate lawyers over local lawyers https://work-fromhomee.com/firms-should-stop-favoring-expatriate-lawyers-over-local-lawyers/ https://work-fromhomee.com/firms-should-stop-favoring-expatriate-lawyers-over-local-lawyers/#respond Tue, 27 Apr 2021 00:33:45 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/firms-should-stop-favoring-expatriate-lawyers-over-local-lawyers/ in All the news / By: BVI News on April 26, 2021 at 7.44 a.m. / Government Lawmaker Neville ‘Sheep’ Smith At-Large territorial representative Neville ‘Sheep’ Smith called some local law firms that he said treated expatriate lawyers better than local lawyers. Smith said expatriate lawyers are given priority for higher-level jobs and more attractive […]]]>


Government Lawmaker Neville ‘Sheep’ Smith

At-Large territorial representative Neville ‘Sheep’ Smith called some local law firms that he said treated expatriate lawyers better than local lawyers.

Smith said expatriate lawyers are given priority for higher-level jobs and more attractive offers, while local lawyers are often told they are unqualified.

“We cannot afford to let other lawyers come here and outshine our lawyers when they have the same qualifications. We keep saying that we want our people to work and do things, but we have to support them. We need to find ways so that these lawyers can enjoy the same advantages as expatriate lawyers. When these lawyers come here, they come to gain experience from us and most of the time they leave and open their own law firm, ”Smith explained.

He said some local firms are neglecting local lawyers and recruiting from the Caribbean and the UK; on the pretext that local lawyers do not have the experience.

“We have to do something about it. I saw a lawyer who got a scholarship to go abroad and do her masters and she went to take study leave and she didn’t get it. But another expatriate lawyer requested and obtained study leave. It is not fair. These are the kinds of things that happen to our lawyers, ”Smith revealed.

BVI’s financial services industry attracts many lawyers from around the world. But Smith said more needs to be done to create a level playing field where local lawyers are protected and have the same opportunities as their expatriate colleagues.

“I’m not saying the lawyers who come here don’t deserve something, but the lawyers here also deserve something. I am not going to sit here in this honorable chamber and watch as we send our people out to be educated and when they come back they play second fiddle in front of anyone, ”Smith said.

The Fahie-led administration has been urging employers to recruit locally since the start of their tenure. However, the appetite for expatriate talent remains rich in the British Virgin Islands, as some imported talent enjoys lower pay while others are said to have more experience filling the gaps in the local market.

Copyright 2021 BVI News, Media Expressions Limited. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or distributed.



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Poet Ellen van Neerven wins Book of the Year, Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry and Multicultural NSW Award at the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards https://work-fromhomee.com/poet-ellen-van-neerven-wins-book-of-the-year-kenneth-slessor-prize-for-poetry-and-multicultural-nsw-award-at-the-nsw-premiers-literary-awards/ https://work-fromhomee.com/poet-ellen-van-neerven-wins-book-of-the-year-kenneth-slessor-prize-for-poetry-and-multicultural-nsw-award-at-the-nsw-premiers-literary-awards/#respond Mon, 26 Apr 2021 22:36:12 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/poet-ellen-van-neerven-wins-book-of-the-year-kenneth-slessor-prize-for-poetry-and-multicultural-nsw-award-at-the-nsw-premiers-literary-awards/ Mununjali Yugambeh’s young author Ellen van Neerven scored a hat trick at the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards for their second collection of poetry, Throat, in an online ceremony Monday night. Awarding van Neerven’s collection the Book of the Year (valued at $ 10,000), the Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry ($ 30,000) and the Multicultural NSW […]]]>


Mununjali Yugambeh’s young author Ellen van Neerven scored a hat trick at the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards for their second collection of poetry, Throat, in an online ceremony Monday night.

Awarding van Neerven’s collection the Book of the Year (valued at $ 10,000), the Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry ($ 30,000) and the Multicultural NSW Award ($ 20,000), the judges saluted the “beauty, honesty and power” of the work and declared that it “confirms their place as one of the sharpest and most convincing poets of their generation”.

“The gorge is both intimate and radical, giving us a glimpse into the life, experiences and thoughts of van Neerven, while piercing the trauma at the heart of this country.”

Accepting their rewards from the lands of Turrbal and Yuggera near Meanjin (Brisbane), van Neerven expressed his gratitude and surprise.

“It gives me a boost to keep doing what I’m trying to do, which is to write as gently and as carefully as possible,” said the poet.

Speaking to the ABC, van Neerven also acknowledged the special bonanza of the prize money.

“I’m really grateful for that. Because you know, if I was just relying on book sales, I wouldn’t have any money.”

The $ 60,000 will give them “time and space” for larger projects.

“You know, on paper, I’m 30 years old and I’ve written three books and I’ve done a lot of other kinds of books, anthologies and that sort of thing as well. It looks like I would probably be like ‘go go for it’ – but in fact I tried not to rush things, ”van Neerven told the ABC.

“This is how I got to a point where I’m happy with a book – like with this book [Throat]. I probably worked there for about four or five years. But it’s a luxury – not to rush. “

Van Neerven is the third Indigenous poet to win the Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry since it was first awarded in 1980, following Samuel Wagan Watson (2005) and Ali Cobby Eckermann (2013).

Meanwhile, this year’s Christina Stead Prize for Fiction ($ 40,000) went to Kate Grenville, for A Room Made of Leaves – a fictional account of the life of Elizabeth Macarthur, wife of the prominent British settler and Australian and wool merchant John Macarthur.

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to search, up and down arrows for volume.

Scroll down for the full list of rewards

As with last year’s event, which was held just a month after the state library closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s award winners were announced via a pre-recorded digital ceremony broadcast on the State Library of NSW website.

State Librarian John Vallance, who hosted the ceremony, said: “I really hope this is the last time we have to do it like this. In 2022, I look forward to welcoming you all in no one at the State Library. “

‘A sense of community’

Throat is divided into five loosely thematic chapters, but across the volume van Neerven also sketches out his own story arc – on poems with titles like The Only Black Queer in the World, Chermy (after Westfield Chermside Mall), Dysphoria and unsent SMS. .

Hot pink background with bright color illustration of face and text: THROAT ELLEN VAN NEERVEN

There is the feeling of multiple awakenings at work – political, sexual, cultural, literary – and an active struggle against racism, capitalism, memory, identity, grief and trauma.

There is a one-page “Throat Reader-Author Power-Sharing Treaty” – with a place to sign and an accompanying note. “What is our relationship with each other? What are our expectations of each other?” wonders the author.

The collection is supported by this kind of playful engagement with the reader; by evoking the family and the community; and by humor and hard-earned wisdom.

Van Neerven said one of the most rewarding experiences since the book’s publication in 2020 has received feedback from readers – especially younger, First Nations and queer readers.

“It gets so many comments from readers who aren’t really interested in poetry. Even people who tell me, ‘This is the first book of poetry I’ve read’ – and that, for me, is so huge… because I think I tried to write it down as a bit collective [experience] – a job that did not only concern me, but also a sense of community. “

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to search, up and down arrows for volume.

The precariousness of poetry

Van Neerven is not kidding when they say “it doesn’t make financial sense to be a poet”.

The prizes are “like a lottery”, the poetry draws are generally smaller than most fiction – and between the two there is a lot of commotion.

“I have to supplement my income in different ways,” they said.

“At one point, you know, you have eight jobs at a time – and no sick leave.”

Poetry is important to them, however.

“Poetry has always been meaningful to me because it’s so important in the community,” they told ABC.

“For First Nations people, poetry is one of the most popular forms, and always has been.”

Like many children, they struggled to take advantage of the Western “canon” as taught in school – and as a result, had to overcome some degree of impostor syndrome.

“For a long time I was like, ‘I can’t write poetry because I can’t write a sonnet or I don’t rhyme’ – or, you know, all these kinds of things about poetry that you read. at school. “

Intensive reading – especially poetry from First Nations, people of color, women, and trans and non-binary writers – gave them confidence.

“I have read so much poetry in recent years, and it has given me permission to be a poet myself.”

Heroes, mentors and peers

Mentors and “heroes” have also played a crucial role in the development of van Neerven.

When asked what drives them to overcome obstacles to pursue poetry, they replied, “I guess I really like to read it – and there are a lot of poets that I really admire. And, you know, you go and you read with them, and you get so inspired, you’re like, ‘I just wanna keep doing this.’ “

Heroes include the late Oodgeroo Noonuccal and Lisa Bellear, and contemporary poets Ali Cobby Eckermann and Samuel Wagan Watson (both former winners of the Kenneth Slessor and Book of the Year awards).

Van Neerven also thanked two mentors in their acceptance speech: Sue Abbey, former editor-in-chief at the University of Queensland Press (which publishes van Neerven) and founder of the black & write indigenous writing and publishing project; and the writer and poet Wiradjuri Jeanine Leane.

Van Neerven is not an outlier either; they are part of a cohort of young First Nations poets, mostly women, who seem to thrive – if not financially, then creatively and in terms of readership.

These include Alison Whittaker, Evelyn Araluen and Kirli Saunders – all of whom are on the lineup for this week’s Sydney Writers Festival, alongside van Neerven.

Van Neerven places this in a longer term movement.

“Over the past 10 or 15 years, there has been a surge in the literary industry for more First Nations people to work behind the scenes in the production of the work – whether as editors, editors, reviewers, the people who organize it – and that contributes to how the work is viewed and how it is disseminated. “

At the same time, the audience for poetry seems to have grown – or at least rejuvenated – as evidenced by the viral popularity of figures like Canadian Rupi Kaur and American Amanda Gorman.

“There is this thirst for poetry through social media and Instagram [and] it’s a lot easier to share online – like, ‘i saw this great poem online’ than ‘i read this great novel’, ”said van Neerven.

“It can go viral so quickly which is really amazing.”

Whether this can translate into financial stability for poets remains to be seen.

Complete list of winners

Book of the Year ($ 10,000)
Throat by Ellen van Neerven (University of Queensland Press)

Christina Stead Fiction Prize ($ 40,000)
A Room Made of Leaves by Kate Grenville (text edition)

UTS Glenda Adams Award for New Writing ($ 5,000)
Cherry Beach by Laura McPhee-Browne (text edit)

Douglas Stewart Prize for Non-Fiction ($ 40,000)
The Warrior, the Traveler and the Artist: Three Lives in the Age of Empire by Kate Fullagar (Yale University Press)

Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry ($ 30,000)
Gorge by Ellen van Neerven (UQP)

Patricia Wrightson Prize for Children’s Literature ($ 30,000)
The World’s Largest Bookstore by Amelia Mellor (Affirm Press)

Ethel Turner Prize for Children’s Literature ($ 30,000)
The End Of The World Is Bigger Than Love By Davina Bell (Text Edit)

Nick Enright Award for Dramatic Writing ($ 30,000)
Milk by Dylan Van Den Berg (The Street Theater)

Betty Roland Award for Screenwriting ($ 30,000)
FREEMAN by Laurence Billiet (General Strike & Matchbox Pictures)

Multicultural NSW Award ($ 20,000)
Gorge by Ellen van Neerven (UQP)

NSW Translation Prize ($ 30,000) – biennial prize – joint winners
Autumn manuscripts by Tasos Leivaditis, translated by NN Trakakis (Smokestack Books)
Imminence by Mariana Dimópulos, translated by Alice Whitmore (Giramondo Publishing)

Special Price ($ 10,000)
Melina Marchetta

People’s Choice Award
Pip Williams Lost Words Dictionary (Affirm Press)



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There are no “monsters” behind bars | Notice https://work-fromhomee.com/there-are-no-monsters-behind-bars-notice/ https://work-fromhomee.com/there-are-no-monsters-behind-bars-notice/#respond Mon, 26 Apr 2021 21:41:09 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/there-are-no-monsters-behind-bars-notice/ By Theresa Canales Imagine being constantly judged for something you didn’t do, a mistake, or maybe the worst thing you’ve ever done. At the root of our human existence are many needs, but I believe that one basic need is forgiveness. We all need forgiveness, and forgiving others can be an extremely liberating experience. Our […]]]>


By Theresa Canales

Imagine being constantly judged for something you didn’t do, a mistake, or maybe the worst thing you’ve ever done. At the root of our human existence are many needs, but I believe that one basic need is forgiveness. We all need forgiveness, and forgiving others can be an extremely liberating experience.

Our world is rife with so much prejudice and discrimination, but I wonder if we could solve these problems if we looked at it from a different perspective. How do you react when you read a story about crime or incarceration? Do you think everyone who goes to jail or jail must have done something wrong? How do you treat those you meet who have a criminal record?

Did you know that[i]:

There are many different monthly sightings throughout the year, but perhaps a lesser known one is Second Chance Month, which Prison Fellowship began in 2017. In recent years, several states, including New Jersey, as well as the White House have issued proclamations declaring April as Second Chance Month. The aim is to raise awareness of the collateral consequences of a criminal conviction and to open a second chance for people who have paid their debt to society to become citizen contributors.

The past year has been unprecedented in many ways due to the impact of COVID-19 on our country, including the country’s prisons. Much work has been done to mitigate the effects behind bars, including efforts to release detainees. In New Jersey, Bill S2519 was passed last fall and since then thousands of men and women nearing the end of prison terms have been released.

While this is a much-needed relief for those who remain incarcerated and the staff who work in penitentiaries, those who re-enter society have set foot in a “second prison”, which includes obstacles that waste human potential and increase freedom. recurrence, ultimately putting the public at risk. security. Unfortunately, many former incarcerates will continue to be tried and punished on the basis of their past. With over 1068 collateral consequences – or restrictions that limit access to education, employment, housing and more – exist only in New Jersey, considerable work needs to be done.

I believe:

  • People with a past can come out of their failure and become contributing members of their community.
  • No one should be defined solely by the criminal justice system.
  • In a justice which restores, recognizes and advances the dignity of human life.

I had the good fortune to meet and visit many people incarcerated before COVID-19 and the suspension of visits. The only thing I can tell people is that there are no “monsters” behind bars, only human beings. At the end of the day, we’re all in the same boat. A person with a criminal record is no less a person than a person without a criminal record. We all deserve human dignity and worth, redemption and a second chance.

Consider the impact you can have in someone’s life by giving them a second chance, whether you are an individual, an employer, a congregation or a community. Maybe it is a job, food, toiletries, shelter, your time, or your talent. Maybe it’s even more fulfilling. Consider the invaluable and richly rewarding impact of extending forgiveness.

Theresa Canales is a financial services professional, veteran and mother of two. She volunteers with Prison scholarship as an ambassador for justice and serves in the prison ministry at Calvary Chapel in Old Bridge.

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Is the extreme work culture worth it? https://work-fromhomee.com/is-the-extreme-work-culture-worth-it/ https://work-fromhomee.com/is-the-extreme-work-culture-worth-it/#respond Mon, 26 Apr 2021 20:04:46 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/is-the-extreme-work-culture-worth-it/ Across the entry-level positions at many of the world’s leading financial institutions and consulting firms, there are no illusions of nine to five or summer vacations with phones left in. the hotel room. From the start, junior employees are aware that they are entering a trial by fire – and it is up to them […]]]>


Across the entry-level positions at many of the world’s leading financial institutions and consulting firms, there are no illusions of nine to five or summer vacations with phones left in. the hotel room. From the start, junior employees are aware that they are entering a trial by fire – and it is up to them to survive the flames.

However, just because these entry-level workers have a sense of what they are going to face does not always mean that they are properly prepared or that their expectations match their eventual reality.

In March, 13 analysts from first-year Goldman Sachs – the lowest group on the corporate totem pole – carried out an “ investigation ” into their working conditions at the prestigious multinational bank, in a document seen by the BBC. The survey, modeled on Goldman Sachs’ official pitchbook template, detailed the group’s 95-hour work weeks, poor mental and physical health, deteriorating personal relationships, and conditions one respondent called of “inhuman”.

The content of the investigation was, in some ways, shocking. But, in others, some of the results were not entirely unexpected. For many branded jobs, this is how it can work for younger people – and it has been for a long time.

The prevailing narrative: It’s just the price you pay for a longer term reward of power and prestige at the big paycheck institutions. But for young people just entering the workforce, is the hard work worth the epic reward, even if it can come with worrying side effects? Some may say so.

‘A boot-camp mentality’

This nose-to-grind culture in these types of jobs has been around in one form or another for years, says William D Cohan, author of a bestselling book on the history of Goldman Sachs, Money and Power, and who has also worked on Wall Street for 17 years.

For example, in finance, when big banks went public, the amount of work employees had to do “increased exponentially,” Cohan says. “The demand for what they did skyrocketed, and the demand from employees then exploded.



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Construction projects underway during Work Zone Awareness Week https://work-fromhomee.com/construction-projects-underway-during-work-zone-awareness-week/ https://work-fromhomee.com/construction-projects-underway-during-work-zone-awareness-week/#respond Mon, 26 Apr 2021 19:49:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/construction-projects-underway-during-work-zone-awareness-week/ TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) – Drivers on the roads, listen! Several construction projects are currently underway in our observation area, and the blocked roads will not go away anytime soon. From rebuilding roads to widening freeways, the Florida Department of Transportation wants you to be careful on the roads as you navigate these changes while working […]]]>


TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) – Drivers on the roads, listen!

Several construction projects are currently underway in our observation area, and the blocked roads will not go away anytime soon.

From rebuilding roads to widening freeways, the Florida Department of Transportation wants you to be careful on the roads as you navigate these changes while working to make them more efficient.

The largest project currently underway by the Florida Department of Transportation is the widening of the Crawfordville Highway. The stretch begins south of East Ivan Road north of SR 267.

FDOT says this $ 25.5 million project includes pavement widening, milling and resurfacing, signage upgrades, drainage upgrades, sewer main construction, construction of box culverts and new signs and pavement marks.

Pat Herring, a resident of Wakulla County, shares, “I’m sure a lot of people are frustrated with this because it takes forever.”

Herring lived just off the Crawfordville Highway and hopes the years of groundbreaking finally come to an end: “I know it has to happen, progress is inevitable, but if they could just hurry up a bit, I would definitely be. happy. . “

Projects similar to this crop up throughout the Big Bend.

“We have everything for resurfacing, replacement of sidewalks or widening projects,” said Ian Satter of FDOT.

In Leon County, the Florida Department of Transportation will be milling and resurfacing a section of US 90 and making improvements at several intersections along the road to increase pedestrian safety. This includes the installation of whelks for pedestrians at several intersections of secondary roads.

There will also be a new lane configuration with bicycle lanes from Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue to St. Margaret’s Church Road. Also at the eastbound turn lane on St. Margaret’s Church Road. There will be intersection improvements at Salt Road, as well as a new water pipe installation between Mahan Drive and Martin Luther King Jr.

In Jefferson County, there will be a resurfacing of SR 20 (US 27) in Jefferson County from the Leon County Line west of Chittling Street. The existing traffic lanes, auxiliary lanes, center crossings and paved shoulders will be redone. FDOT says the typical section consists of two 12-foot lanes of traffic, a 10-foot outer shoulder (four-foot paving stone), and an eight-foot inner shoulder in each direction. The traffic lanes are separated by a 32-foot grassed median. FDOT also shares that the right-of-way varies throughout the project boundaries and no additional right-of-way will be required.

Satter says the reason for the increased construction is that, as the months get warmer, it’s a great time to lay down the asphalt.

While the extra time in traffic or road detours can be an inconvenience for drivers, during this week of “Work Zone Awareness Week” it is important to remember those who are there.

“Pay attention to work areas, be aware of the people who work in those work areas,” Satter said of good driving rules, “Avoid distractions, slow down.

Satter also shares additional information that is important to keep in mind during #WZAW:

  • Speed ​​is a contributing factor in more than 6% of fatal accidents in work areas in 2019.
  • Work area accidents pose a risk to roadside workers who were present in the work area in 35% of fatal accidents and 44% of serious injury accidents.
  • According to statewide accident data from 2015-2019, Florida has experienced more than 50,000 workplace-related accidents, including more than 380 fatalities and more than 2,400 serious injuries.
  • In 2019, 21% of fatal accidents in work areas involved rear-end collisions.
  • National Work Zone Awareness Week began in 1999 when the Federal Highway Administration, the American Traffic Safety Services Association, and the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials signed a memorandum of understanding committing to raising awareness among the public. public to work area safety issues through national media. countryside.
  • National Work Zone Awareness Week will take place from April 26 to 30, but FDOT efforts will run from April 5 to May 30.

Those who use the roads day in and day out hope that the orange cones and construction tractors leave behind an improved and perfected travel experience.

Copyright 2021 WCTV. All rights reserved.



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