Flexible work options – Work From Homee http://work-fromhomee.com/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 05:03:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://work-fromhomee.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png Flexible work options – Work From Homee http://work-fromhomee.com/ 32 32 Adapt and Grow: The Revolutionary Role of Flexibility in a New Era of Remote Working https://work-fromhomee.com/adapt-and-grow-the-revolutionary-role-of-flexibility-in-a-new-era-of-remote-working/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 03:28:12 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/adapt-and-grow-the-revolutionary-role-of-flexibility-in-a-new-era-of-remote-working/ “The greatest danger in times of turbulence is not the turbulence; it’s acting with yesterday’s logic,” said management guru Peter Drucker, in a truism that speaks volumes in the post-Covid era. The U.S. labor market is currently at a crossroads, with new and volatile crosswinds, including booming job vacanciesand Americans quitting their jobs at recording […]]]>

“The greatest danger in times of turbulence is not the turbulence; it’s acting with yesterday’s logic,” said management guru Peter Drucker, in a truism that speaks volumes in the post-Covid era.

The U.S. labor market is currently at a crossroads, with new and volatile crosswinds, including booming job vacanciesand Americans quitting their jobs at recording rate – forcing leaders to rethink the parameters of what work means.

Where once upon a time corporate America was ruled by the rigid presenteeism of a 9-to-5 world, the same logic these days – in settings where remote working is possible – will cost employers dearly. According to a March 2022 Gallup study, 54% of fully remote workers in the United States said they would look for another job if their company stopped offering remote work options.

In a highly competitive climate, however, the ability to work from anywhere is only the start of a major structural overhaul that most CEOs will need in their repertoire. The larger challenge is to build a culture that puts employee trust and autonomy at the center of attention. Here’s why and how this change can happen.

Expand the talent pool

With a folder 4.5 million American workers quit their jobs In November 2021 alone, it’s no wonder more than two-thirds of CEOs see a skills shortage as this year’s biggest disruptor.

This trend can be found all over the world, including Great Britainin a particularly acute crisis within engineering and technology-led roles – crucial areas for business growth in the digital age.

As a startup operating out of London, one of the world’s leading tech startups, our leadership team quickly recognized the importance of flexibility in bridging this talent gap. And, while we’ve always prided ourselves on having an open and agile work culture, we realized we needed to raise the bar by making it a key tenet of our post-Covid structure.

This change resulted in the implementation of two major policies. First, we decided to hire remote workers internationally by partnering with a service called deel to manage local payroll and compliance issues for us. And secondly, we’re bringing into play a ‘work abroad’ benefit, whereby our existing team members are supported to live and work around the world in a location of their choosing for a month. So far, employees have used it to work everywhere, from Berlin to Los Angeles and the south of France.

These decisions, both focused on flexibility, have allowed us to expand our talent pool by hiring people around the world quickly and seamlessly. And, most importantly, we can attract world-class candidates from the travel industry – many of whom will relish the opportunity to spread their wings working abroad.

Create a hybrid culture

What workplace flexibility will look like will vary across different industries and organizational needs; but the key is to listen to your employees; and push the boundaries of what you think you can achieve. With flexibility now a primary consideration for talent retention (McKinsey) and CEO standing up for lose nearly 40% of their workforce with a forced return to the office (Gartner), the old work rules no longer apply.

Creating a new people-centric hybrid culture is therefore a must. In an environment where many leaders still tend towards the precedent in office, with concerns about remote compliance issues or a lack of interpersonal connection, this change will be nothing short of drastic. And to work, it requires a bastion of very flexible protocols and benefits in place.

Part of the challenge is deciding what flavor of remote work you will embrace as a business. Will you be fully remote or will you be spending time together in the office quarterly? And will you be remote and synchronous, or remote and asynchronous (meaning fewer meetings and everything being rigorously documented)? These choices have a major impact on the type of people who will be attracted to your business and the processes you will follow in a flexible culture.

Once you’ve made these important decisions, you’ll want to dig into more specific hybrid working strategies. Research shows that Gen Z and Gen Y workers, in particular, favor remote working methods; but with the caveat that they are completely inclusive, with room for all team members to learn and grow. To combat the risk of proximity biasyou will need to provide a range of management training, working methods and promotion follow-up measures.

The power of autonomy

Ultimately, flexibility in a post-Covid era is not about paying lip service to one-time benefits, such as flexible start or end times. It’s not even just about introducing provisions for remote work per se.

To return to Peter Drucker’s advice, flexibility in the truest sense of the word is about restructuring the “logic of yesterday” with a new approach to operations, hiring and development decisions; one that is rooted in remote working capabilities.

Beyond day-to-day work logistics, or even company signage, flexibility is a matter of mindset. Employee autonomy being a central pillar of happiness at workthe CEOs who will thrive in the age of flexibility are those who give their people the freedom to choose where and how they work.

Flexibility is a matter of openness and trust. This allows leadership teams to detach themselves from outdated management terms and instead recognizes that team members themselves can make the best decisions about how to work productively, regardless of where they live or where they live. number of hours they spend.

The world of work is changing rapidly, and a severe skills shortage calls for decisive action from America’s CEOs. It starts with exploring what flexibility in a remotely led culture really means for your business; and how it can be used to attract new and diverse talent in an increasingly global market.


Written by Radha Vyas, CEO and co-founder of adventure travel company Flash Pack.
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World Tourism Day – Works have become increasingly popular: Chander K Baljee, Chairman & MD, Royal Orchid Hotels & Regenta Hotels https://work-fromhomee.com/world-tourism-day-works-have-become-increasingly-popular-chander-k-baljee-chairman-md-royal-orchid-hotels-regenta-hotels/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 15:42:26 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/world-tourism-day-works-have-become-increasingly-popular-chander-k-baljee-chairman-md-royal-orchid-hotels-regenta-hotels/ The past two years have been turbulent for the hospitality industry with uncertainties across all divisions. In such situations, while many hotel providers have shut down, some have managed to stay afloat and many have fully recovered. In a post-pandemic world, with the flattening of the Covid-19 graph, people are starting to travel again. This […]]]>

The past two years have been turbulent for the hospitality industry with uncertainties across all divisions. In such situations, while many hotel providers have shut down, some have managed to stay afloat and many have fully recovered. In a post-pandemic world, with the flattening of the Covid-19 graph, people are starting to travel again. This time it’s not just normal travel rules, but preferences that have changed. Among the many trends such as staycations and weekend gateways, workstations have also become increasingly popular among today’s travelers. It’s not just hotels that are turning into business getaways, but many hostels are embracing this trend as well. This is made to cater to digital nomads who want to get away from the hustle and bustle of city life.

In an effort to catch up with this growing trend, when the concept was new to the market, our team reached out to all potential old customers. Customers who have opted for remote work options have responded enthusiastically to the idea. Having cared for clients with work needs, we realize that different needs motivate people to rent for long stays. Some want a safe sanctuary from Covid, especially in the case of Tier 1 and Tier 2 cities. Many others want to escape household chores and finally, last but not least, the only motivation is simply wanting to change being locked up at home, especially if the option is a villa with a view and a pool.

Chander K Baljee, President and CEO of Royal Orchid Hotels & Regenta Hotels, told FinancialExpress.com that he had also noticed that, directly or indirectly, companies and software companies were promoting this concept which helped both employees and the hospitality industry. Here is an excerpt from an interaction with Baljee:

Work has arisen as a result of the pandemic. What do you think is the future of this trend in the years to come?

There has been a disruption in the hospitality industry since the start of the pandemic. While many hotel establishments have closed, some have managed to stay afloat and some have fully recovered. Now, with the pandemic graph flattening, people are starting to travel again. This time it’s not just the rules, but the travel preferences have changed. Like staycations and weekend gateways, works have become increasingly popular among travelers. It’s not just hotels that are turning to the works; hostels are also embracing this trend, especially to meet the needs of digital nomads who want to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city.

Read also | Mahakal Corridor: Prime Minister Modi to inaugurate Ujjain Temple redevelopment project soon

The work is not limited to a few industries. Today, companies are asking employees to return to work. However, the concept of hybrid working is quickly becoming a baseline expectation for most employees, and organizations are already seeing the effects. Staff turnover has increased dramatically when employees are required to return to the office full-time, and 52% of employees say flexible working policies will impact the decision to stay with their organization. Revenue will continue to grow because the emotional costs of leaving an organization are lower when it is hybrid and there are more choices. To combat this high turnover, connect hybrid employees to the culture of the organization and invest in talent management processes to expand employee networks.

You mentioned that “directly or indirectly, companies and software companies have encouraged the works”. Today, more and more companies are asking employees to return to work with a drastic reduction in the culture of working from home. What is your point of view ?

Yes. Today, most companies are asking their employees to return to work. They must also be mentally prepared to return to normal. According to reports, out of 100 companies, 50-60% still allow employees to work from home for various reasons. Nevertheless, news reports suggest that by 2025, normalcy will return to all industries. We also noticed a hybrid approach helping both businesses and employees. In this new trend, an employee is expected to be present in the office whenever their physical presence is required and also organize events and internal development activities.

With your background in the hospitality industry and its ever-changing nature, how have your businesses adapted and how are things different in a post-pandemic world?

The evolution of any new trend in the hospitality industry is well embraced to be on top of our game and capture the right amount of market share for our business. When the working concept was realized, our team quickly reached out to all of our potential former clients who supported us. Guests who had remote work options responded enthusiastically to the idea as they wanted to escape the bustle of the city. We believe that different needs motivate people to engage in long-term rentals. Some want a safe sanctuary from the pandemic, especially as cases of Tier 1 and Tier 2 cities mount. Others want to escape household chores. The third motivation is simply to want a change from being restricted to the house, especially if the option is a villa with a view and a swimming pool.

Read also | Advantage India: World is coming to India as the country sees rising global share of medical tourism

Regarding the works, which of your properties received the most visitors? i.e. resorts, hill stations, commercial properties, etc.

We cannot pinpoint exactly which properties have been most successful as guest preferences vary. Many of our clients have opted for beach properties while some mountain resorts or our wildlife resorts. Thus, we are clear that we want to offer our customers an unforgettable experience. Today’s traveler is all about new experiences, in line with this thinking we are investing in experiences such as wildlife, spirituality, heritage and recreation as we continue to expand into Tier 1 cities and of level 2.

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More women are studying STEM, but there are still stubborn barriers in the workplace https://work-fromhomee.com/more-women-are-studying-stem-but-there-are-still-stubborn-barriers-in-the-workplace/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 23:37:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/more-women-are-studying-stem-but-there-are-still-stubborn-barriers-in-the-workplace/ Today, the Australian Government released the STEM Equity Monitor 2022 – the country’s annual dashboard on gender participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and careers. This data is more relevant than ever. Australia is facing unprecedented skills shortages in critical areas – we need highly skilled people to help us meet our […]]]>

Today, the Australian Government released the STEM Equity Monitor 2022 – the country’s annual dashboard on gender participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and careers.

This data is more relevant than ever. Australia is facing unprecedented skills shortages in critical areas – we need highly skilled people to help us meet our economic, environmental and technological challenges.

Future careers in all sectors will depend heavily on STEM skills. But a lack of diversity means we have a limited workforce and lack a wide range of perspectives.

Read more: Australia needs more engineers. And more of them must be women

What does the dashboard say?

We start with some positive news: the number of women enrolled in university STEM courses increased by 24% between 2015 and 2020, compared to a 9% increase for men. There has been a more gradual increase in STEM professional enrollments, where only 16% are women.

Women’s participation in the labor market is also gradually increasing. The proportion of skilled STEM jobs held by women was 15% in 2021, an increase of 2% in just 12 months.

Stem Equity Monitor Data Report 2022, CC BY

But only 23% of senior executives and 8% of CEOs in STEM industries are women. On average, women are paid 18% less than men across all STEM industries – although this gap narrowed by 1% last year.

Three graphs showing the gender pay gap in all STEM, all health sectors and all sectors

Stem Equity Monitor Data Report 2022, CC BY

Although we are more successful in attracting women to certain university STEM courses, very few women continue in professional STEM education. And there’s far too little attention paid to keeping STEM-qualified women in the workforce.

A five-year study of 2011 STEM graduates of the year found that in 2016, only 1 in 10 STEM-qualified women worked in a STEM industry, compared to more than 1 in 5 STEM-qualified men. of gender were not collected.

The huge difference in retention rates should come as no surprise when you consider the gender roles imposed by our society and the vastly different experiences people face, both in the workplace and in society at large.

It is important to recognize key gaps in this data, for example on other gender identities, sexual orientation, socio-economic factors, disability and race. Expanding the data captured will allow us to better understand the full impact of the many intersecting barriers to participation that people face.

We need structural changes in the workplace

Companies with chronic skills shortages cannot continue to focus on programs designed to expand the pipeline, hoping the system will fix itself. We need structural changes in the workplace.

One avenue is to introduce more flexible work options and expand access to paid parental leave. According to the Agency for Gender Equality in the Workplace, equal primary carer leave was offered by 3 in 5 employers in 2020-21.

Thanks to a concerted effort by many employers, 12% of those leaves were taken by men last year, almost twice as many as the previous year. This figure was even higher (20%) in management positions.

Read more: New two-year term for Australian Government Women in STEM Ambassador

Prejudice, discrimination and sexual harassment are major factors that cause people to leave their workplace. Addressing these issues receives too little funding and attention.

Sexual harassment in the workplace costs Australia $3.5 billion a year and exacts a terrible personal toll on those affected. Women are more likely to be sexually harassed than men, and people from racial minorities, people with disabilities and LGBTQIA+ people suffer disproportionately.

According to the national survey report Respect@Work: Sexual Harassment, sexual harassment is more prevalent in male-dominated industries. The Australian government recently committed to implementing all 55 recommendations in this report – an important and positive step.

Read more: We asked our scientists about the influential women in their lives

Companies urgently need to put strong systems in place to prevent discrimination, bias and sexual harassment. There are many excellent tools available to guide this work, for example those provided by the Australian Human Rights Commission, Chief Executive Women, the Workplace Gender Equality Agency, Our Watch and the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering .

Removing Barriers to Labor Market Participation

Ultimately, we need rigorous and well-resourced initiatives to reduce barriers to labor market participation. To that end, my office has created a National Evaluation Guide for STEM Equity Programs.

Several graphs showing the proportion of women receiving research grants

Women are underrepresented in STEM teaching and research roles. Stem Equity Monitor Data Report 2022, CC BY

Rather than the usual public relations campaigns and cupcake drives, we need to invest in evidence-based solutions to address systemic issues affecting people facing discrimination in the workplace.

Nothing less than strong, decisive and coordinated action by governments and business will change this trend. The Australian government has already moved in this direction, announcing a review of existing government women in STEM programs.

Read more: UNSW researcher named Australian STEM superstar

This review will determine the impact of these programs, in order to direct future investments towards actions that have been proven to strengthen Australia’s STEM workforce.

The key to diversifying STEM workplaces is respect – and reducing the power gaps that appear along gender, culture and other lines.

A greater respect for each person will build a stronger and more cohesive society, ready to meet future challenges. And it will ensure that Australia’s fast-growing sectors – like space, advanced manufacturing, quantum technologies and cybersecurity – will be well supported by a skilled workforce in the future.

The conversation

Lisa Harvey-Smith, Australian Government Women in STEM Ambassador, Professor, UNSW Sydney

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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The right skills are essential to survive in a changing digital landscape https://work-fromhomee.com/the-right-skills-are-essential-to-survive-in-a-changing-digital-landscape/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 20:28:11 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/the-right-skills-are-essential-to-survive-in-a-changing-digital-landscape/ To have a world-class skilled workforce in India, flexible skills are promoted in the workplace to stay current and relevant across all organizations. “Thus, digital transformation is underway for productivity and growth, which will lead to a continuous influx of talented professionals in all fields,” say Akshay Marwah and Mohit Marwah, Co-Founders and Co-CEOs, AAFT […]]]>

To have a world-class skilled workforce in India, flexible skills are promoted in the workplace to stay current and relevant across all organizations. “Thus, digital transformation is underway for productivity and growth, which will lead to a continuous influx of talented professionals in all fields,” say Akshay Marwah and Mohit Marwah, Co-Founders and Co-CEOs, AAFT Online, in an exclusive interview with Bizz Buzz.

Why are creative millennials choosing to go digital to upskill themselves for career growth?

While some changes have been seen in the education model with the introduction by CBSE of an arts-integrated curriculum, the Delhi government is emphasizing the entrepreneurship curriculum and creative courses, and the change in the mindset of students and parents has resulted in a natural infusion of young people. This will help fuel creativity.

Why do IITians and PhDs choose creative fields to change careers?

For decades, conventional careers were considered the only financially viable and most respected career options. Fortunately, those days are now behind us. Today, there is a massive realization that converting passions into careers is infinitely rewarding in the long run. Professional courses are readily available in several creative fields that can be tapped into by talented students and professionals looking to leave the beaten path and move into less conventional but rewarding career choices.

Why do Gen Z digital natives struggle to find suitable courses online?

Over time, the world of digital learning becomes easier and more accessible, but finding the right program and content remains a difficult task. For this reason, online courses are followed by a verbal feedback mechanism. That’s why our ed-tech platform, AAFT Online, is investing in simplifying our curriculum and content with online educational technology to make life easier for Gen Z learners to transform the way we work. now and in the years to come.

How are entrepreneurs taking action to address the acute skills shortage by offering solutions?

In 2017, the McKinsey Global Institute estimated that automation and artificial intelligence would cause 375 million workers, or 14% of the global workforce, to change jobs or learn new skills by 2030. Candidate behavior is rapidly changing and moving to new employment amidst many job cuts. And it will take time for the new workforce to fill the void created by job changes in the industry. This is why entrepreneurs and ed-tech platforms offer courses tailored to market needs.

How is the shortage of human talent managed in India?

To accelerate training initiatives, companies are implementing company-wide training programs to bridge the gap between demand and supply of talent to serve the market. To have a world-class skilled workforce in India, flexible skills are promoted in the workplace to stay current and relevant across all organizations. Thus, digital transformation is underway for productivity and growth, which will lead to a continuous supply of talented professionals in all fields.

How does AAFT Online view the rise of the IT industry and its continued growth in the country?

The edtech market is growing at a healthy pace with large companies and startups entering this space. The growing penetration of internet and data at affordable prices makes edtech highly accessible across the vast socio-economic landscape of the country. Edtech players are paving the way for higher quality education and opening up new job opportunities for students and professionals. The industry itself is creating several new jobs like online tutors, student advisors, virtual lab instructors, and course managers. The industry is therefore destined to continue to evolve and grow in the years to come.

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Golf Australia is making parental support a priority, aiming to keep women in their jobs https://work-fromhomee.com/golf-australia-is-making-parental-support-a-priority-aiming-to-keep-women-in-their-jobs/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 20:34:20 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/golf-australia-is-making-parental-support-a-priority-aiming-to-keep-women-in-their-jobs/ It’s 7:30 a.m. in London when Stacey Peters picks up the phone. “Sorry if I’m speaking a little softly, my daughter is still sleeping,” Golf Australia’s women’s course manager said. “I promise I’m generally a bit more enthusiastic.” Stacey has nothing to apologize for. The fact that she is accepting an interview at this hour […]]]>

It’s 7:30 a.m. in London when Stacey Peters picks up the phone.

“Sorry if I’m speaking a little softly, my daughter is still sleeping,” Golf Australia’s women’s course manager said.

“I promise I’m generally a bit more enthusiastic.”

Stacey has nothing to apologize for. The fact that she is accepting an interview at this hour speaks volumes about her enthusiasm for her job. Being flexible and adapting to care responsibilities is part of everyday life, although it may not yet be completely normalized for women working in sport, especially in high performance.

Peters has just completed a week of supporting elite amateurs at the recent World Amateur Championship in Paris. It’s a huge event for up-and-coming golfers to show what they’re capable of and during this tournament Stacey captained the Australian women’s team consisting of Kirsten Rudgeley, Kelsey Bennett and Maddison Hinson-Tolchard.

Australia’s elite amateur golf team at the World Amateur Championship in Paris.(Provided: Stacey Peters)

Golf Australia’s High Performance (HP) program plays an important role in supporting these athletes throughout their development, including ensuring that HP staff are present at every stage of these international tournaments.

But for new mum Stacey, jumping on a plane to continue doing the job she loves was a bit daunting, and leaving her 16-month-old daughter, Zoe, was unimaginable.

“As soon as I mentioned, ‘I don’t think I can go without Zoe for two and a half weeks’, Brad (Brad James, HP’s managing director at Golf Australia) said, ‘what should we do?’ “Peters said.

Golf Australia strives to achieve its strategic goal of gender equity by not only attracting and recruiting talented women into high performance roles, but also retaining them.

Make parental support a priority

To ensure Peters can continue the work she loves, Golf Australia has covered Zoe’s travel costs and offered to pay for another carer to go to Paris with her so she can feel her best. to do his job.

Zoe Peters holds a plastic golf club and ball and walks onto the green.
Stacey Peters was able to take her 16-month-old daughter, Zoe, on a work trip to France.(Provided: Stacey Peters)

Golf Australia’s Vision 2025 strategy focuses on creating more visible heroes to inspire future generations of girls with more female coaches in roles to develop these players. A key part of this strategy is supporting working mothers through Golf Australia’s High Performance Programme.

Supporting women who have been returning to a career in sport for some time, such as taking parental leave, is something the Victorian government has also identified as needing more personalized attention. The Bureau’s latest scholarship programs for women in sport and recreation included a specific stream for women who had interrupted their careers, highlighting the different support some women may need.

Brad James, Golf Australia’s Managing Director of High Performance, sees the challenges women can face in the high performance space and embraces golf’s strategy to help drive change in his team.

A portrait of Brad James.
Supporting families with childcare, travel companions and ongoing flexibility is common sense to keep women on their career path, Brad James says.(Supplied: Golf Australia)

“Female staff are really hard to find in high performance because there is such a need to travel, especially for our sport where the majority of our athletes are based overseas. Most of the time you serve those athletes all over the world. So it was like, how do you keep having the best staff or keep the best staff.

“I don’t want someone like Stacey to leave, I don’t want any of our good people to leave, so we have to try to find a way to keep them.”

James sees supporting women and families with childcare, travel companions and ongoing flexibility as a sensible puzzle piece when it comes to attracting and retaining women working in sport. . The additional cost that this level of support entails is also something he sees as part of this, no different from other staff incentives.

“At the end of the day, you just add it to a budget line. It’s a priority, and if it’s a priority, you’re going to find a way to fund that. And have [women] within our team is a priority.

Stacey talks to Luke on a trail at the golf course while Zoe sleeps in the pram.
Peters was able to take Zoe on the course in her pram when she needed to.(Provided: Stacey Peters)

“When you look at organisations, they always try to make sure the staff are happy. Now whether you do that through social outings, bonuses, whatever you do, to me that’s just part of a process to ensure that staff are happy so that they can perform their role to the best of their ability.

“It can be to provide a good computer, a company car, which can provide a service to take care of their child.

“Organizations are already doing these things. They just haven’t added this child care line. They give staff computers, they give them parking, they give them clothes, what’s the difference?”

Support is tied to performance

This approach to retaining staff with family and care responsibilities also goes beyond staff satisfaction, although this is a good reason to support staff in these high-pressure HP roles, but to James, it’s also strategic and linked to the overall performance of the organization and their athletes.

“I will do anything to make sure our staff play their part because then I know my athletes are improving which is ultimately what we are trying to do.

“But what we’re also hoping for is that women look at our sport and say it’s a sport I might want to get into, because I might want to work in it. I might want to play in it.”

Stacey Peters plays a shot.
Peters is a former LPGA and LET tour player.(Getty Images: David Cannon)

For Peters, this personalized and case-by-case approach to meeting his needs has reinforced his love for his job, his sport and his organization.

“I feel even more supported by Golf Australia now because of what they’ve done. So I’m like, in it, you know what I mean? My love for working for Golf Australia has gone to another level, because of that.

“I know they went above and beyond for me and so I don’t take that for granted.”

The grass isn’t always greener

Golf’s approach to supporting staff with young families is not widely available in other sports organizations.

Peters reflects on the realities some women face in this space when deciding to start a family, and whether she was also placed in a situation where additional care and support was not offered.

Children climb on top of a man sitting on the ground in front of a golf scoreboard.
Golf Australia provided nannies for its staff during a recent trip to Paris for the World Amateur Championship.(Provided: Stacey Peters)

“If I can’t do a lot of the travel, I can’t do my job too. So I guess you can start looking at other options that maybe aren’t in the sport and that for me, even the thought of that for me right now doesn’t make me very happy.

“I would obviously think very differently because we 100 per cent want to have a family, and it’s no secret I don’t just want a kid either, so I want to make it work.

“I want to work in sports and I want to work in golf. But if they hadn’t been so supportive, well, I think I would be looking [at my job] very differently.”

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Peters hopes the approach Golf Australia has taken to support her in the HP space will become more of the norm in the sport for women to gain entry into more traditionally male-dominated sports and into male-dominated positions in the sport. these sports.

“I think in order to keep good female personnel in the sport during this time in their lives, I think that kind of approach is essential for other organizations to make it work,” Peters said.

James also wants more sports organizations to be more open to case-by-case support to keep more women in these roles so we see more progression.

“If anything, just be open to discussion with your employee. Don’t just think ‘well, no, that’s not something that’s done.’

“If more sports organizations can balance adapting a little more support to women during this stage of their lives, more women like Stacey can continue in the careers they love without fear that choosing to have a family means losing their jobs.”

ABC Sport partners with Siren Sport to improve coverage of Australian women in sport.

Kasey Symons is a researcher with the Sport Innovation Research Group at Swinburne University in Melbourne and co-founder of Siren: A Women in Sport Collective.

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Big New Zealand companies thrive while SMEs struggle to keep up https://work-fromhomee.com/big-new-zealand-companies-thrive-while-smes-struggle-to-keep-up/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 22:41:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/big-new-zealand-companies-thrive-while-smes-struggle-to-keep-up/ Business leaders face significant challenges across the board, but small businesses are facing the toughest journey in 2022, according to the latest Shaping Business Study from 2degrees. The report, conducted by Perceptive on more than 700 decision makers from employing companies around Aotearoa, found that companies of different sizes had a very different experience over […]]]>

Business leaders face significant challenges across the board, but small businesses are facing the toughest journey in 2022, according to the latest Shaping Business Study from 2degrees.

The report, conducted by Perceptive on more than 700 decision makers from employing companies around Aotearoa, found that companies of different sizes had a very different experience over the past year, and identified more professional benefits. and flexible working as key drivers for success in today’s environment.

“Kiwi businesses face an incredibly challenging environment, but the effects are not being felt in the same way,” says Andrew Fairgray, chief commercial officer of 2degrees.

“Costs are rising across the board, businesses are clamoring for skilled staff and Covid continues to pose challenges, but big businesses are weathering the storm in ways that smaller businesses are not.”

Prospects change according to the size of the company

Only 36% of business leaders feel more optimistic about their business compared to a year ago, down four percentage points from 2021. In contrast, 31% felt less optimistic and 33% felt pretty much the same.

Large companies are much more likely to be optimistic about their prospects; only 31% of small business leaders (1-20 employees) said they were more optimistic, dropping to 43% of medium-sized business leaders (21-50 employees) and 57% in large businesses (51+ employees).

Medium and large businesses were also more likely to anticipate revenue growth over the next 12 months and plan to increase investment in their business over the next year.

People are now the key to business success

Over the past 12 months, there has been a major shift in what businesses are looking for to thrive. The 2021 2degrees Shaping Business Study found that the number one thing business leaders needed to help their businesses thrive was cash as they navigated their way through pandemic-related disruptions. In 2022, the best solution was more skilled staff, with 3 in 10 business leaders saying it would help their business thrive, while cash (29%) and more staff (29%) are always on their minds .

Successful companies address their challenges by adapting their ways of working, with hybrid working dominating. Nearly half (48%) of business leaders said they have adapted their work model since the pandemic to include adjustments like hybrid and remote working, and greater online collaboration with internal and external parties.

“Attracting and retaining talent is critical in today’s business environment. Many of our own customers have told us it’s people, people, people and the research backs that up,” says Fairgray.

“With more than half (52%) of companies prioritizing productivity planning to invest in employing more skilled people over the next 12 months and sweetening the deal by introducing benefits such as furloughs and training options.

Flexible means productive

Medium and large companies were more likely than small companies to have adapted their work model, and research has shown that this decision translates into better business results. Companies that had changed their working model were much more likely to say that productivity (38%) and their ability to innovate (50%) had increased since the pandemic than companies that had not changed.

“We often talk about flexible working as a way to support our employees, but these numbers show it’s also a good business decision, and we’ve seen it happen ourselves at 2 degrees,” says Fairgray.

“This research shows that companies of all sizes looking to improve their productivity and innovation should seek new ways of working to unlock new opportunities, even in a challenging environment.”

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How to start a side business in 7 steps https://work-fromhomee.com/how-to-start-a-side-business-in-7-steps/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 20:07:02 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/how-to-start-a-side-business-in-7-steps/ Newsletter Marie-Claire Celebrity news, beauty, fashion tips and fascinating features, delivered straight to your inbox! Thank you for subscribing to . You will receive a verification email shortly. There was a problem. Please refresh the page and try again. By submitting your information, you agree to the terms and conditions (opens in a new tab) […]]]>

Investing in your career is the smartest financial decision you can make. Why? Because it affects your long-term purchasing power. And investing in your career can mean creating additional or multiple streams of income. A side hustle can be the first step towards a significant increase in your net worth: side hustle gives you the opportunity to learn new skills and explore new career paths, while creating an additional stream of income.

I talk about starting my business, Clever Girl Finance, in my new book. Choose to thrive: triumph over adversity, get out of your comfort zone, realize your life and achieve your money dreams (opens in a new tab). The steps I share with you were essential in the early stages of building my business, which I started in 2015. As you read, you’ll notice that “getting out of comfort zones” is a central theme to launch a secondary agitation. , because it involves adopting entirely new work habits and mindsets that differ from a traditional full-time job.

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Minneapolis Start Tribune Editorial | Approaching the long COVID like an economic dra | Editorials https://work-fromhomee.com/minneapolis-start-tribune-editorial-approaching-the-long-covid-like-an-economic-dra-editorials/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/minneapolis-start-tribune-editorial-approaching-the-long-covid-like-an-economic-dra-editorials/ The rear-view mirror held up to the 1918 flu pandemic by a definitive historical account offers unexpected but valuable insights into a problem plaguing the modern age – an alarming labor shortage. “Pale Rider”, a book by Laura Spinney, debuted in 2017, 99 years after the “Spanish flu” encircled the world and three years before […]]]>

The rear-view mirror held up to the 1918 flu pandemic by a definitive historical account offers unexpected but valuable insights into a problem plaguing the modern age – an alarming labor shortage.

“Pale Rider”, a book by Laura Spinney, debuted in 2017, 99 years after the “Spanish flu” encircled the world and three years before COVID-19 brought the world to a halt in 2020. The chapters more intriguing are those who examine the short- and long-term ripple effects of the 1918 pandemic.

If the past is prologue, expect a baby boom as we retreat from the current pandemic. Fertility rates rebounded “dramatically” as the flu waned a century ago, Spinney writes. Another implication if past patterns hold: the labor pool will be shallower than it should be for some time.

The obvious reason for this in 1918 was the death toll from the pandemic. But today’s policymakers should also consider the lingering health effects of many flu survivors. At the time, we often spoke of weariness and despair. “There is good evidence…that the Spanish flu itself was a chronic disease and had a negative impact on the health of some people for months or even years after the initial flu,” Spinney said.

There seems to be a sequel to the COVID-19 pandemic. After the initial infection, an alarming number of people continue to battle the long COVID. It is the informal name given to continuous brain fog, fatigue, headache, dizziness, shortness of breath and other symptoms. “While hospitalized patients are more susceptible, even those with mild cases can experience long COVID,” according to the National Institutes of Health.

A new report from the Brookings Institution provides a valuable public service by drawing a direct line between long COVID and current labor shortages. It is a thought-provoking read. Clearly, a continued national response is needed to protect public health and the economy.

The report came out at the end of last month. One of his contributions is his triangulation of surveys and other data to get a reliable estimate of the number of Americans with long-term COVID who are no longer working.

The information gathered came from the US Census, the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, the Lancet medical journal and other resources. The midpoint of the range of estimates is “3 million full-time equivalent workers”, or “1.8% of the entire US civilian workforce”.

That’s a staggering number, but as the report notes, it’s consistent with findings from other countries. This also mirrors a Harvard economist’s recent estimate that “labour force participation is still about 1 percentage point lower than demographics predicted.”

The solutions outlined in the report are pragmatic and include:

• “More speed, more money and more trials are needed to understand the pathophysiology of long COVID (and other post-viral illnesses) and identify treatments.” Although this effort would involve considerable amounts of public funds, it should be seen as a necessary investment for a healthy workforce.

• Measures to maintain the participation of people with long-term COVID in the labor market. This could include remote work options or flexible working hours, for example, which would help employees deal with fatigue or other symptoms.

•Ongoing monitoring of the long COVID and its impact on the workforce, as well as ongoing evaluation of successful interventions to help those struggling with the disease continue to work.

• Ensure that workers with long-term COVID can access medical care and, if necessary, medical assistance programs so that they can regain productivity. Although Minnesota is fortunate to have clinics offering this care, federal incentives may be needed to ensure there are enough medical providers with this expertise.

State legislators also have a role to play. Unfortunately, Minnesota lawmakers missed a chance in the last session to enact a lengthy COVID starter package to conduct oversight and identify ways to help struggling families. The measures passed the DFL-controlled House but fell victim to end-of-session disagreements over health and human services funding with the Republican-controlled Senate.

This error should be rectified. Lawmakers should also rely on Minnesota’s world-class medical providers and employers to improve the state’s response. Too often, this pandemic has prompted a false choice, pitting COVID-19 countermeasures against economic growth. History and modern data suggest that they complement, not oppose.

— Minneapolis Star Tribune

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Federal public service employees frustrated with ‘vague’ return-to-work plans https://work-fromhomee.com/federal-public-service-employees-frustrated-with-vague-return-to-work-plans/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/federal-public-service-employees-frustrated-with-vague-return-to-work-plans/ As federal employees gradually return to the office in person, some workers and members of the public service union say they want more clarity and consistency from the Treasury Board of Canada on working arrangements. Since the beginning of March, the federal ministries have been gradual return to on-site or hybrid work after receiving the […]]]>

As federal employees gradually return to the office in person, some workers and members of the public service union say they want more clarity and consistency from the Treasury Board of Canada on working arrangements.

Since the beginning of March, the federal ministries have been gradual return to on-site or hybrid work after receiving the green light from Treasury Board, which oversees the federal workforce.

The Treasury Board said in a statement that there is “no one-size-fits-all approach” and that deputy ministers each have the authority to determine how their employees will make this return.

But with decisions in the hands of individual departments, some civil servants are frustrated by the lack of consistency.

“We don’t see a clear direction as to what going back to work looks like,” said Sharon DeSousa, national executive vice-president of the Public Service Alliance of Canada, a union representing about 200,000 workers in across the country.

She said she’s heard from union members talking about a lack of responses and a sense of “instability” surrounding returning to work, particularly with how plans differ from department to department.

Sharon DeSousa, speaking outside the Treasury Board of Canada building at a rally, said public service workers are seeing different return-to-work plans from department to department. (Jean Delisle/Radio-Canada)

DeSousa said employees deserve to have safe and healthy work environments, adding that everyone’s mental health has suffered from the pandemic. Employees need to know that the government has their backs, she said.

“They need consistency, they need support, they need to make sure their health and wellbeing is taken care of, and they need clear communication.”

WATCH | Federal workers still see ‘instability’ around return-to-work plan, union says

Federal workers still see ‘instability’ around return-to-work plan, union says

Sharon DeSousa, national executive vice-president of the Public Service Alliance of Canada, says it’s still unclear how a hybrid work model for federal employees will be implemented.

“Loose and Vague Guidelines”

Kristina MacLean, who works for the Department of National Defence, said she currently advocates a hybrid working model, but the lack of strong language outlining telecommuting options makes it difficult.

“We’ve done the job, we’ve shown we can do the job, now it’s time for everyone to be a bit flexible.”

MacLean said the lack of consistency across departments is a “major problem”.

“Right now it’s at the discretion of the employer,” she said. “Depending on what department you’re in or what classification you’re in, you get different treatment and you could all be working in the same office.”

Kristina MacLean, seen here at a rally for workers’ rights, says she is concerned about inconsistent return-to-work plans that are at the discretion of the employer. (Jean Delisle/Radio-Canada)

MacLean said she discovered that the communication surrounding the return to work was made up of “vague and vague guidelines” that are subject to interpretation.

“I think that puts us in dangerous territory because if it’s entirely up to the discretion of the employer, how are we going to protect workers’ rights?”

In its Labor Force Survey for August, Statistics Canada said it continues to see an upward trend in people reporting hybrid working arrangements, with 8.6% of respondents working in a hybrid model. .

Statistics Canada said it does not have data on the number of federal public service employees currently working remotely or in a hybrid model.

Differences between departments

CBC News has contacted various federal departments about their plans regarding the return of employees to the workplace. The Department of Canadian Heritage did not respond to CBC in time for publication.

  • The Canada Revenue Agency said it will move towards a hybrid work model and gradually increase the number of employees working on-site.
  • The Ministry of Finance said it is adopting a hybrid plan where most employees will work both in-person and on-site, and hopes employees will eventually spend 50% of their time in the office.
  • The justice department said it is now adopting a hybrid work model and that employees wishing to work from home will need to have telecommuting agreements approved by October 3. There is currently no department-wide minimum number of days to work onsite.
  • The Ministry of National Defense said it will gradually transition to a hybrid workforce over the next few months. About 50% of its employees were working on site during the pandemic, he said.
  • The Public Safety Department said it would adopt a hybrid model, with telecommuting arrangements defined in collaboration with employee managers. He said the process should be finalized by November 2022.
  • Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) said it officially began implementing its flexible working model on September 6, with many ESDC employees continuing to work on-site.
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada said it has maintained essential services on site throughout the pandemic, and an increasing number of employees have come to work regularly in recent months. By September, all executives must have a regular and sustained on-site presence, and all employees or executives who telecommute must have a signed telecommute agreement.
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada said a significant number of its employees continued to work on-site throughout the pandemic, and over the summer employees were returning to offices across the country. Hybrid working arrangements have been adopted and the department said it expects employees to be in the office one to two days a week.
  • Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada said the health and safety of its employees is a top priority as they transition to a hybrid workforce.
  • Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada said it is continuing its transition to a hybrid workplace model.
  • Indigenous Services Canada said he expects to return to the worksites this fall and that an in-person presence will be scheduled for one day a week or more. Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada said it continues to work on a phased return to work for the fall as more employees return to work.
  • Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada said it is implementing a return-to-office plan, with the majority of its employees adopting a hybrid plan, working onsite two to three days a week on average. Some employees will have more or less days of presence depending on their function.
  • Public Services and Procurement Canada says he is gradually transitioning to a hybrid workplace.
  • Transport Canada said each employee has an individual working arrangement with their manager, and employees have the option of returning to work full-time or a hybrid plan depending on their job requirements. The working arrangements agreements are to be implemented by September and several employees have already worked on site throughout the pandemic.
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Working from home remains the most popular perk https://work-fromhomee.com/working-from-home-remains-the-most-popular-perk/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 05:11:09 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/working-from-home-remains-the-most-popular-perk/






Survey results focused on the most popular work benefit among UK office workers* in 2022 is the option to work from home, either in a hybrid or full-time capacity.

Surveying 1,000 Urespondents selected the top three job-related benefits that matter most to them when evaluating a new job opportunity. According to the survey results:

  • Work-from-home options — which include hybrid working and full-time remote working — topped the list, chosen by a majority (52%) of respondents.
  • The four-day working week (at full pay) comes second, chosen by two in five respondents (40%).

The findings suggest that work-life balance is a top priority for UK workers in the post-COVID era. This is confirmed by new data from Workplace Advanced Associateswhich revealed that UK workers currently only work in the office 1.5 days a week, on average.

The option of working from home was more popular among women surveyed, with nearly three in five (59%) ranking it as one of the main benefits of the job, compared to just 42% of men. ”Childcare or financial help” was only selected by 12% of women surveyed and 8% of men, suggesting that remote work allows more people to balance their parental duties with their obligations. professionals.

Although it has already been rolled out to 3,300 employees, as of June 2022 a four-day working week at full pay was not chosen by the majority of UK workers* (60%) as a benefit major. While working from home has been tried and tested by most office workers during the pandemic, these new findings point to uncertainty surrounding the four-day week among UK office workers.

UK workers appear to be doubling down on their preference for flexible working arrangements at a time when many companies, like Apple, are beginning to tighten restrictions on hybrid work policies. Office and recreation benefits were among the lowest ranked benefits, with ‘free meals or meal allowance’ selected by only 14% of respondents, and ‘gym membership’ selected by only 8% .

“In today’s post-COVID ’employee market’, it’s clear that workers no longer just value benefits that promote work-life balance — they need them,” said Amanda Augustine. , career expert for TopCV. “While a free lunch, beanbags and foosball may have caught the eye of new hires before the pandemic (when five days in the office was the norm), employees now have a taste for browsing more comfortably in their personal and family lives, and as these results suggest, they don’t want to sacrifice this arrangement. Adding a new initiative to the mix, such as the four-day week, will no doubt create more appetite among British workers for flexible arrangements in the months ahead.

*TopCV

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