Flexible work options – Work From Homee http://work-fromhomee.com/ Wed, 05 May 2021 02:12:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.1 https://work-fromhomee.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png Flexible work options – Work From Homee http://work-fromhomee.com/ 32 32 Use of flexible hours at work has plummeted during pandemic while working from home has skyrocketed, CIPD analysis shows https://work-fromhomee.com/use-of-flexible-hours-at-work-has-plummeted-during-pandemic-while-working-from-home-has-skyrocketed-cipd-analysis-shows/ https://work-fromhomee.com/use-of-flexible-hours-at-work-has-plummeted-during-pandemic-while-working-from-home-has-skyrocketed-cipd-analysis-shows/#respond Tue, 04 May 2021 23:12:28 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/use-of-flexible-hours-at-work-has-plummeted-during-pandemic-while-working-from-home-has-skyrocketed-cipd-analysis-shows/ While working from home has increased in recent months, the use of flexible working hours – such as part-time, flexible hours and compressed hours – has plummeted during the coronavirus pandemic, new analysis shows of the CIPD. CIPD’s analysis of the ONS Labor Force Survey of 74,832 people (October to December 2020) found that working […]]]>


While working from home has increased in recent months, the use of flexible working hours – such as part-time, flexible hours and compressed hours – has plummeted during the coronavirus pandemic, new analysis shows of the CIPD.

CIPD’s analysis of the ONS Labor Force Survey of 74,832 people (October to December 2020) found that working from home (flexible location) is the only arrangement that has increased since the start of the pandemic. This is despite the fact that many people need to balance their work with other commitments, such as home schooling, childcare or other caregiving responsibilities, or volunteering.

The comparison of the different flexible working arrangements used in April-June 2020 with those used in October-December 2020 shows a downward trend that emerges for all flexible working arrangements:

  • The use of part-time work increased from 28.3% to 27.6%
  • Flexi-time usage increased from 12.7% to 12.6%
  • Annualized hours usage increased from 6.4% to 6.2%
  • In contrast, homework is the only form of flexible work arrangement that increased during this period from 7.8% to 10.1%. When comparing the last quarter of 2020 to January-March 2020, homework has practically doubled, from 5.3% to 10.1%.

This means that many workers do not enjoy the benefits of using arrangements such as flexible time (modified start and end times), part-time hours, annualized hours (a total number of hours for the year, worked according to different patterns each week or month) and shared jobs. It also risks creating divisions or a ‘two-tier’ workforce between those who can work from home and those who have to travel to the workplace and have little flexibility in the way they work. .

In response, CIPD urges employers to expand access to a range of flexible work options, tackle inequalities in the workforce, and give people a greater voice not only on the job. where they work, but also when. The ICPD also calls on organizations and government to ensure that the right to ask for flexible work one day a day through its # FlexFrom1st campaign, rather than after 26 weeks of employment, as is the current requirement.

Peter Cheese, Managing Director of CIPD, the professional body for the development of human resources and people, comments:

“There has been a huge shift towards working from home since the coronavirus pandemic and it has been positive for a lot of people, with many organizations now looking to provide more choice in people’s workplaces when we are getting out of lockdowns. But our analysis shows a worrying downward trend emerging for all other forms of flexible working. If the use of other flexible working arrangements continues to decline, this will raise many questions about fairness and equality in the workplace for those whose jobs require them to be in a workplace.

“Working from home should not be the only flexible way of working available, and employers should take steps to offer and encourage adoption of a wide range of options that give everyone the opportunity to have more choice and flexibility in the way they work. More flexible work in all its forms attracts and retains people with a wide variety of needs and expectations in how they work, thereby fostering more diverse and inclusive workplaces. It can also be good for well-being and productivity.

“We have all learned a lot in the past year and we need to take that learning forward to put people first and move to flexible work becoming the norm, not the exception. This is why the CIPD is calling for the right to ask for flexible work from day one, so that everyone can have more choice and have a say in when and how they work. “

Official data also highlights unmet demand for flexible working arrangements, with 9.3% of workers – or around 3 million people – saying they would prefer to work fewer hours and accept the pay cut. resulting. This suggests that, for many, the traditional 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. workday is too rigid, and that arrangements such as flexible time, compressed hours, and part-time hours might fit people’s preferences better.



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NREL study reveals counterintuitive relationship between flexibility options and downsizing power systems with high solar penetration https://work-fromhomee.com/nrel-study-reveals-counterintuitive-relationship-between-flexibility-options-and-downsizing-power-systems-with-high-solar-penetration/ https://work-fromhomee.com/nrel-study-reveals-counterintuitive-relationship-between-flexibility-options-and-downsizing-power-systems-with-high-solar-penetration/#respond Thu, 29 Apr 2021 03:50:20 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/nrel-study-reveals-counterintuitive-relationship-between-flexibility-options-and-downsizing-power-systems-with-high-solar-penetration/ The increasing penetration of variable renewable energy (VRE) into power systems is expected to increase reduction – the reduction in renewable energy supplied due to oversupply or lack of system flexibility. But while reduction can be the new normal in the evolving network, and can even be managed in a way that makes the network […]]]>


The increasing penetration of variable renewable energy (VRE) into power systems is expected to increase reduction – the reduction in renewable energy supplied due to oversupply or lack of system flexibility. But while reduction can be the new normal in the evolving network, and can even be managed in a way that makes the network more flexible, it is important to find an optimal level of it to get the most out of VRE resources.

The NREL Study on Reducing High Solar Energy Futures provides insight into the importance of operating thermal generators at average PV penetration levels (25% to 40%) and the potential need to revise the rules eligibility of operating reserves and compensation structures as PV penetrations continue to increase. Image by Cynthia Shahan, CleanTechnica

While it is generally accepted that a lack of flexibility in the system increases reduction, it has not been well understood how individual flexibility options affect reduction, especially in high VRE futures. Analysts at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have completed the first in-depth study of how different approaches to system flexibility could impact reducing VRE (primarily solar) penetration levels. Flexibility options include battery storage, thermal generator flexibility, transmission, and allowing ERV and storage to provide operating reserves, among others.

Results – published in a Joule item – reveal two key findings that collectively constitute a “reduction paradox” that emerges as the system evolves towards higher levels of solar penetration. First, the flexibility of thermal generators has the greatest impact on reducing ERVs in the solar photovoltaic (PV) penetration averages, but not in the low or high ranges. Second, when ERV and storage are allowed to provide operating reserves, system-wide operating costs and abatement levels decrease, which in turn reduces the economic incentive to operate. PV to supply these reserves with reduced energy in a wholesale market environment.

Modeling approach

NREL’s analysis used a system that is roughly based on the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s (LADWP) production and transmission system, taking advantage of the data sets developed for the Los Angeles Study on 100% Renewable Energy (LA100). NREL used capacity expansion modeling to establish future scenarios of building the least expensive power systems with increasing levels of penetration of ERV resources. Next, the analysts used a utility-grade production cost modeling database to optimize the least expensive production and transmission resources to assess the detailed operation of each future construction scenario.

This is the first time that this complete suite of models has been used for a realistic and highly resolved system in high future PV to identify the operational factors that contribute the most to reduction and the potential value of PV to provide reserves. operating with reduced energy.

Paradox 1: The flexibility of the heat generator has the greatest impact on reduction only at mid-PV penetration levels

The flexibility of the thermal power plant – ramp-up rate, minimum production levels, and minimum rise and fall times – allows the power system to meet grid fluctuations as needed and to maintain a balance between supply and demand. request.

In the study, NREL made the counterintuitive observation that the flexibility of thermal power plants has a much greater impact on reducing ERV in a “transition zone” at average PV levels (about 25% at 40% in the study system) only at lower or higher levels. Of the various aspects of thermal generator flexibility, minimum production levels have the greatest impact on reduction in this area.

However, when PV penetrations are low (around 20%), there is not enough ERV for thermal flexibility changes to have a significant impact on the system. When PV penetrations are higher (around 45%), there is not enough incentive to use the remaining heat capacity to adjust operations and produce significant abatement effects.

“We also call the transition zone the ‘Goldilocks zone’ where it’s just the right combination of PV and thermal generators to result in thermal flexibility impacts on reduction,” said Bethany Frew, NREL senior energy analyst and principal investigator. of the study.

This aspect of the reduction paradox reveals the importance of solar evolution and interaction with the rest of the system, especially with regard to the flexibility of thermal power plants in power systems that are moving from fleets to thermal dominance. predominantly VRE. He also suggests that a phased approach might be needed to support the ongoing transformation of the power system.

Paradox 2: Using ERV and storage for operating reserves means lower operating costs and reductions, but reduced revenues

Limited and stored renewable energy is increasingly seen as a potential source of operating reserves, or the capacity available to the system operator in a short period of time to meet demand during events such as load forecast errors or scheduled outages.

As modeled in the study, simulated high PV penetration scenarios in which VRE and storage resources are not allowed to provide operating reserves result in significant increases in reduction and operating costs – indicating the aggregate value of enabling these resources to provide operating reserves.

However, this value does not necessarily translate into increased revenue potential in a wholesale market environment – which is the second aspect of the reduction paradox.

“Allowing ERV and storage to provide operating reserves results in low prices, which reduces the incentives for PV to provide operating reserves with reduced energy,” said Frew. “This aspect of the solar reduction paradox reveals the importance of proper value alignment and grid system compensation.”

Storage built for capacity and energy transfer services often has spare capacity for reserves, especially during periods of breeding. Because storage has a cost close to zero, it results in lower overall operating reserve prices, especially during PV reduction. Allowing storage to provide operating reserves also reduces the amount and hours of reduction, limiting the periods in which PV could use the reduced energy to provide operating reserves.

Add VRE on top of storage and the prices drop even more. Overall, there is little incentive for photovoltaics to provide operating reserves with reduced energy. It cannot compensate for the drop in income due to greater levels of reduction and lower energy prices with high levels of ERV.

“We have found that PV provides value to the system without sufficient opportunity for monetary compensation,” said Frew. “Market designers may need to revise operating reserve eligibility rules and compensation structures as PV penetrations increase.”

Future work

Overall, the study highlights the highly nuanced nature of flexibility and its role in the solar reduction paradox, and indicates that storage and thermal generators are important factors in a system’s flexibility needs. (and reduction levels) with high solar penetration levels.

Future work could explore other sensitivity factors with additional storage penetration levels and various system configurations. In addition, a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis of thermal generator flexibility upgrades could assess the overall cost competitiveness with storage and other flexibility options as power systems evolve towards greater penetration of thermal generators. ERV.

Learn more about NRELs energy analysis research.

Article courtesy of NREL.


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We need to keep women in tech https://work-fromhomee.com/we-need-to-keep-women-in-tech/ https://work-fromhomee.com/we-need-to-keep-women-in-tech/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 11:06:47 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/we-need-to-keep-women-in-tech/ Executives have a responsibility to keep women in tech and help cultivate their career growth. Here are some measurable actions that can help you. The “glass ceiling”, a phenomenon commonly discussed for women in the workforce, does not reflect most women’s experience in technology. The “glass ceiling” refers to an invisible and impenetrable barrier that […]]]>


Executives have a responsibility to keep women in tech and help cultivate their career growth. Here are some measurable actions that can help you.

The “glass ceiling”, a phenomenon commonly discussed for women in the workforce, does not reflect most women’s experience in technology. The “glass ceiling” refers to an invisible and impenetrable barrier that women must face after reaching a certain level in their career while their male colleagues continue to climb around them. While there is a great national conversation around this Glass Ceiling and helping women reach the highest levels of corporate leadership, the reality is that many women who start their careers in tech don’t get away from it all. never find themselves in managerial positions, even at the beginning. In the field of technology, we are not so much fighting against the “glass ceiling” as against the “broken rung”, because women find it difficult to access the first level of management at the same pace as men.

Credit: conceptcafe via Adobe Stock

In American companies, for every 100 men promoted to manager, only 72 women are promoted. For black and Latin women, these numbers are even smaller (according to McKinseyreport 2020, for 100 men promoted, only 58 black women and 68 Latin women receive promotions). The men being almost more numerous than the women 2 to 1 in early managerial positions, it’s no surprise that so many women leave businesses, industries and even the workforce after finding themselves stuck in entry-level jobs.

As an executive working in the tech field for over 20 years, I have seen “the broken echelon” forcing many talented women out of the tech industry. The bad news is that even in 2021, this is a huge barrier to women’s success. The good news is that there are a lot of measurable changes that can be made to fix the problem. Here are four measurable actions that can help you.

1. Make sure women get that promotion first. This is crucial. Once the employee pool begins to shrink in terms of demographics, this will only be magnified with each subsequent leadership level. It is therefore not surprising that women occupy such a small percentage of C-level positions, as they have such difficulty in obtaining promotion opportunities after their first job. A study conducted by LinkedIn found that the number one reason millennials leave the workforce was “lack of advancement opportunities”. Generation X and Baby Boomer women cite “dissatisfaction with senior management” as their main reason for leaving the workforce. Poor early career promotion opportunities will lead to a lack of diversity at the highest and most important levels.

2. Develop women in your workforce. So that women do not get stuck in entry-level positions, companies must make a conscious effort to ensure that women have the opportunity to develop. This can include side opportunities to expand skills, chances to work on difficult projects, and direct access to leadership and mentoring. Keep in mind that women tend to have more underrated language data in their resumes and reviews. This does not make them less efficient or capable, just less outspoken. If you have more entry-level qualified men than women, consider whether men have more opportunities to work on critical assignments, more opportunities to broaden their skills, or more support from the field. from senior management.

3. Make sure that the first level of management has the same demographic breakdown as your entry-level workforce. Businesses need to be committed to ensuring that men do not get promotions and opportunities at a higher rate than women, especially very early in their careers.

4. Adapt family-friendly policies. Flexible work, remote work, childcare, maternity and

paternity leave is essential to retain women in the middle of their career. 45% of women leave tech higher rate only men. While most report lack of career advancement opportunities as the main reason, almost a third of women cite “family” as the main reason for leaving. The adaptation of family-friendly policies like paid maternity and paternity leave, childcare options and flexible work options has been proven to increase retention of all employees. Many companies have seen this happen. In 2012, Google find that postpartum women left the company twice as fast as other employees. After extending their maternity leave and moving from part-time to full-pay, attrition fell by 50%.

Thoughtful and intentional programs and commitments from early employment levels could drastically change the makeup of the industry as a whole in just a few short years. Remember that first-level managers become the pool of candidates for senior executives. Companies are talking about a big game over gender diversity and hiring, but it’s time they showed that commitment by supporting the women they have. Not just by hiring them, but by promoting them, giving them big projects and defending them as they move into the job market.

The ‘broken echelon’ has likely continued over the past year, as the COVID-19 pandemic has forced millions of downgrade their career or leave the labor market altogether due to the increasing demands for care. Women who face the “broken rung” will seldom reach their full potential. They will move to different industries, find it difficult to make up for lost time and, in general, either abandon the workforce altogether or resign themselves to working well below their potential.

As a company, we are missing almost half the potential of our workers in allowing this to continue. As tech leaders, it’s our responsibility to make sure this doesn’t happen – the risk of losing talented women in tech is too high.

Rena Nigam is the Founder and CEO of Meytier, which she started with the mission of helping improve diversity at scale through a technology-driven approach. She is an entrepreneur focused on building and scaling businesses that focus on reimagining businesses through technology. Until 2018, Rena was president and member of the board of directors of Incedo. Previously, Rena co-founded Aspark (sold to LiquidHub, then acquired by CapGemini) and was part of the Mphasis management team until 2011.

The InformationWeek community brings together IT professionals and industry experts with IT advice, training and opinions. We strive to showcase technology leaders and subject matter experts and use their knowledge and experiences to help our audience …

We welcome your feedback on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions on the site.

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Commentary: Why Employers Should Cover WFH Expenses https://work-fromhomee.com/commentary-why-employers-should-cover-wfh-expenses/ https://work-fromhomee.com/commentary-why-employers-should-cover-wfh-expenses/#respond Tue, 27 Apr 2021 04:24:36 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/commentary-why-employers-should-cover-wfh-expenses/ SINGAPORE: As of April 5, more employees were able to return to the office as workplaces shifted to a more flexible way of working. Immediately after the announcement of the easing of restrictions, many expressed concern that it could herald a possible return to pre-COVID working arrangements. Publicity Publicity However, public discourse, several surveys and […]]]>


SINGAPORE: As of April 5, more employees were able to return to the office as workplaces shifted to a more flexible way of working.

Immediately after the announcement of the easing of restrictions, many expressed concern that it could herald a possible return to pre-COVID working arrangements.

However, public discourse, several surveys and employer actions since then have shown this to be less likely than previously thought.

READ: Comment: It will be a waste if parents don’t maintain flexible working arrangements

Many employers have reportedly continued to allow their employees to work remotely and others have introduced hybrid and flexible working arrangements that allow employees to work remotely for a certain number of days per week.

In a survey published in September 2020 by recruiter RGF International, among 95% of local employers who had set up flexible working arrangements, 61% said they intended to offer such devices even beyond the pandemic. .

According to a recent report from Deloitte, over a multi-year horizon, Singapore could have a potential remote workforce of up to 45% across all industries.

The reduction in real estate, travel and infrastructure costs are the main drivers of this phenomenon.

READ: Commentary: Hybrid work can change contractual terms for employees

In view of these savings, employers should begin to seriously channel funds to enable their employees to work effectively from home.

Several began to do so shortly after the establishment of Work-at-Home Arrangements (WFHs) around the world.

E-commerce company Shopify, which employs 5,000 people globally with the majority of its workforce in Canada, announced in March 2020 that its remote employees would receive US $ 1,000 to set up their new home office.

Twitter has provided its teleworkers with the same amount for this purpose in order to facilitate the transition.

READ: Commentary: Despite all their fine words, CEOs don’t share the pain

Since then, various other companies have also announced allowances for telephone and Internet bills.

Some Singaporean companies we work with have started to at least partially subsidize remote employee utility bills and intend to continue to do so.

ARE REFUNDS REALLY NECESSARY?

Some might argue that since those who work from home benefit from savings in terms of, for example, travel costs, employers should not have to reimburse other costs. While employees can channel cost savings in some areas to cost increases in others, is their rationale.

In addition, in June of last year, the Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore announced that workers who incurred WFH expenses last year can claim tax deductions on their employment income in the return of income this year.

(File photo: Unsplash / Chris Montgomery)

This covers expenses such as electricity and telephone bills if they are not reimbursed by employers.

However, there are limits. For example, those who had already set up Wi-Fi routers before working from home will not be able to make a complaint. In addition, one-off costs such as installation or connection costs cannot be claimed, as they are “of a capital nature”.

A QUESTION OF PRINCIPLE AND PRACTICE

Notwithstanding the tax deductions and cost savings for employees on other fronts, companies should seriously consider this not only as a matter of principle, but also for practical reasons.

If one is to argue that employees are already making savings in other areas and therefore do not need additional support from the employer, then the counter-argument could be that companies are squaring additional savings as well. thanks to remote work – in particular in the rental of offices, transport allowances. and other investments in staff well-being such as pantry supplies and meal vouchers.

READ: Commentary: Sitting way too much can affect your mood too

READ: Commentary: Why the call for a global minimum corporate tax is a bad move

Businesses should channel these savings into other benefits currently relevant to employees, such as Wi-Fi and power allowances, so they have everything they need to be productive at home.

Additionally, such a gesture will help boost employee morale and send an important signal that bosses are sincere in making working from home comfortable, doable, and long-term.

Homework (WFH) with home-schooled children

The economic challenges presented by COVID-19 have combined with concerns about home schooling and aging parents to leave many workers with little emotional bandwidth. (Photo: Pexels / Ketut Subiyanto)

Our survey of white-collar professionals shows that they are among the top five determinants of a positive employee experience.

As companies have addressed various other aspects of the employee experience, such as more frequent virtual check-ins to engender a sense of ownership and ensure a collaborative spirit while working remotely, it appears that allowances and reimbursements WFH expenses could contribute just as much. .

In turn, a positive employee experience has the potential to significantly contribute to the bottom line.

An IBM study based on data collected in 45 countries and territories in 2016 and 2017 showed that organizations that rank in the top 25% for employee experience report nearly three times the return on assets compared to bottom quartile organizations.

READ: Comment: What if people don’t want to go back to the office?

These organizations also report double the return on sales compared to those in the bottom quartile.

SHOULD SUCH PROVISIONS BE IN LAW?

Last year, a Swiss high court ruled that companies must contribute part of their employees’ rent if they work from home. While we cannot go this route in Singapore, there are certainly areas that could be the subject of greater clarity, even through legislation.

The support employers should provide in the context of a post-COVID world is uncharted territory, so it’s no wonder employers and employees have questions and are pondering their options.

man works from home

COVID-19 has forced many companies to adopt flexible and remote working arrangements. (Photo: Unsplash / Priscilla Du Preez)

For example, the Singapore Parliament recently clarified that employees are eligible for workers’ compensation if they sustain injuries while working from home.

In public forums, some have suggested that other WFH provisions such as reimbursement for equipment and other work-related expenses should also be enshrined in law.

ADVANTAGES OF HUNTING TALENT

Whether they are or not, employers need to realize that this could benefit them in the long run.

In fact, whether an employer provides such allowances and reimbursements is one of the main questions that job applicants ask us when they are presented with employment opportunities that allow them to work from home.

This is not only a “good to have”, but an important consideration for them.

What the future of post-pandemic work looks like is a mystery, after the transition to work

What the future of post-pandemic work looks like is a mystery, after the shift to work from home eroded the line between leisure and work AFP / JUSTIN SULLIVAN

They regularly say that a company that has such benefits embedded in its HR policy appears to be more progressive and interested in the well-being of its employees.

Candidates would easily choose to work for such a company rather than one that does not provide such support.

You might think that in a crisis, workers would be less aware of who they choose to work for.

READ: Commentary: How to give feedback to your boss without having problems

But this is clearly not the case in many rapidly changing industries such as digital healthcare and communications and information technology, which are experiencing a talent shortage, where the best talent can afford to be. more insightful.

Especially in times of prolonged economic uncertainty, making reasonable adjustments to deliver relevant benefits to employees that serve to enhance their overall experience can boost talent attraction and retention to a significant degree for business results.

Jaime Lim is the CEO of PeopleSearch Group, an executive search and outplacement services company with operations in six cities, including Singapore.



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The dealer group offers a new fee structure https://work-fromhomee.com/the-dealer-group-offers-a-new-fee-structure/ https://work-fromhomee.com/the-dealer-group-offers-a-new-fee-structure/#respond Tue, 27 Apr 2021 01:19:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/the-dealer-group-offers-a-new-fee-structure/ A group of brokers are proposing a new fee structure for financial advisors who choose to work part-time. Centrepoint Alliance has launched a new flexible fee model, available to financial consulting firms with more than one authorized representative. For advisors working part-time, variable costs, including governance and research issues, as well as technical and compliance […]]]>


A group of brokers are proposing a new fee structure for financial advisors who choose to work part-time.

Centrepoint Alliance has launched a new flexible fee model, available to financial consulting firms with more than one authorized representative.

For advisors working part-time, variable costs, including governance and research issues, as well as technical and compliance support can be prorated based on the number of days worked.

Consultants taking maternity or paternity leave will be able to waive their fees entirely for up to 12 months, or pay a reduced fee if they wish to retain access to masterclasses and webinars and complete CPD.

The dealer group said its move responds to the growing trend of part-time work, with data from Roy Morgan showing that around 4.3 million Australians are currently employed part-time.

However, Centrepoint Alliance group executive board Paul Cullen said the financial advisory industry has not traditionally been seen as an industry that allows part-time work.

“There has been a reluctance to offer fee reductions for counselors whose personal circumstances are suitable for reduced working hours,” Cullen said.

“However, financial counseling is no different from any other profession and counselors should have the right to be supported by their licensee if they need flexible working arrangements to balance work and family obligations.”

He added that he had observed an increased demand for part-time financial counseling opportunities, especially among working parents.

“We believe that offering this new fee system will help make the financial advisory industry more attractive and accessible to everyone,” Cullen said.

“We believe that providing fee flexibility will not only allow for greater diversity in the consulting industry, but will also provide more options for businesses that may need part-time consulting.”



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Entry-Level Architect – Los Angeles, CA, United States | Jobs https://work-fromhomee.com/entry-level-architect-los-angeles-ca-united-states-jobs/ https://work-fromhomee.com/entry-level-architect-los-angeles-ca-united-states-jobs/#respond Mon, 26 Apr 2021 21:59:35 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/entry-level-architect-los-angeles-ca-united-states-jobs/ MA | Architects, Inc. Employer: Los Angeles, California, United StatesLocation: Mon, 26 Apr ’21Posted on: Full timeType: MA | Architects, Inc. has an exceptional opportunity for a full-time entry-level position based in our Los Angeles area office to support our growing portfolio of healthcare projects. As a small, studio-based design company, our team members have […]]]>


MA | Architects, Inc.

Employer:

Los Angeles, California, United StatesLocation:

Mon, 26 Apr ’21Posted on:

Full timeType:

MA | Architects, Inc. has an exceptional opportunity for a full-time entry-level position based in our Los Angeles area office to support our growing portfolio of healthcare projects. As a small, studio-based design company, our team members have multiple opportunities to gain experience with all aspects of every project, from concept to construction.

Qualifications:

  • Possess an accredited degree in Architecture or Interior Design (BS or BArch) within one year from date of hire.
  • 0-3 years of professional experience
  • Proficiency in the MS Office suite
  • Excellent graphic and verbal communication skills.
  • Ability to work independently and in a team environment

Specific responsibilities will include:

  • Develop design drawings from concept to construction documents using Revit and / or CAD
  • Deal with coordination elements under the supervision of senior team members
  • Assist the project architect with programming, space planning and material selection
  • Research on building code and other project requirements, ability to work on multiple types of projects simultaneously
  • Participate in client and consultant meetings

MA | Architects, Inc. is a Small Disabled Veterans Owned Business (SDVOSB) and Disabled Veterans of California Trading Company (DVBE) with offices in Los Angeles, California and Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Preference will be given to military veterans, their spouses, and spouses of serving members.

We offer professional growth opportunities, flexible work schedule options, competitive salaries (based on skills and relevant experience), as well as an excellent package of benefits including: Paid time off, insurance medical, dental and visual, 401K, and more.

We are committed to equal opportunities and a diverse workforce and will consider all qualified job applicants regardless of race, religion, color, gender, age, origin national, sexual orientation, gender identity, partnership status, protected veteran status, disability or any other status protected by federal, state or local law.

Submit a cover letter, CV and portfolio to:

admin@ma-architects.net

Must be legally authorized to work in the United States without sponsorship. Persons residing in the United States and holding a legal work authorization applicable to employment in the United States will be considered regardless of citizenship.




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Working parents will quit without remote working https://work-fromhomee.com/working-parents-will-quit-without-remote-working/ https://work-fromhomee.com/working-parents-will-quit-without-remote-working/#respond Mon, 26 Apr 2021 21:27:58 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/working-parents-will-quit-without-remote-working/ Best-selling author Christine Michel Carter is the world’s leading voice for working mothers. Christine’s voice transpires through miles in the hearts, minds and souls of moms around the world. Women in the US, Canada, Africa, Australia, France, UK, Spain, China and India love his writing; this is reflected in its international social media following and […]]]>


Best-selling author Christine Michel Carter is the world’s leading voice for working mothers. Christine’s voice transpires through miles in the hearts, minds and souls of moms around the world. Women in the US, Canada, Africa, Australia, France, UK, Spain, China and India love his writing; this is reflected in its international social media following and above average social media engagement rates.

Featured in The New York Times and The Washington Post, she has been called a “working mom who changes the world,” “who makes a positive impact in the world,” “the mom of influencer moms,” a “mom in business. movement, “A ‘Branded Brain’, one of the” funniest parents on social media, “one of the” best workplace mom blogs to follow for support, laughs and advice “, “the executive inspiring millennial moms” and “the voice of millennial moms.

Christine clarifies misconceptions about mothers working for brands and serves as an amplifier of their personal truths. Whether it’s providing consumer insight and branded marketing content, or helping human resources and diversity teams attract and retain these hard-working professionals, Christine works with advertising agencies. , research firms and businesses to ensure they are at the forefront of women consumers. A down-to-earth speaker and media analyst, Christine has spoken at Create & Cultivate, Mom 2.0, BlogHer and several other conferences. His ideas have been included by other authors in their books. Christine’s best-selling children’s book, Can Mommy Go To Work? has been categorized as an “empowerment book” and a “life-changing book to guide feminist parenting”. Her book MOM AF is a circle of sisters in a book, inspired by both Carter’s life and her published articles.

Over the past decade, Christine Michel Carter has had one mission: to provide working mothers around the world with positive and insightful content to make them feel confident and understood. (Regardless of the title, it is important for society to understand that ALL mothers are, in fact, working mothers.) Malcolm X, United States civil rights activist once said, “The mother is the mother. the child’s first teacher. The message that she gives to this child, that this child gives to the world. As a “global mom activist,” Christine feels that by changing the narrative of what it means to be a mother, she is reducing stress, raising loving children and thus… changing the world.

Christine is aligned with one of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) core health themes: maternal health. This includes the physical, emotional and mental health of women during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period. Additionally, there are cultural nuances during pregnancy, labor, and childbirth that can increase the chances of experiencing mental health issues for moms of color. For example, statistics show that black women are three to four times more likely to die during or after childbirth than white women. As a black mother, Christine is committed to ensuring that black mothers around the world stop suffering in silence.

As a result, Christine Michel Carter leveraged her verified digital presence and Mothers Network to raise awareness about Paid Leave for the United States (PL + US), VoteMama Foundation, Mothers Congress, Campaign Action Phenomenal Woman, Access to Maternal Care and Emergency Reduction (CARE), Mothers and Offspring Mortality and Morbidity Awareness Act, the Modernizing Obstetric Medicine Standards Act of 2019, the Maximizing Outcomes for Moms Through Medicaid Improvement and Enhancement of Services Act, and the Quality Care for Moms and Babies Act, #YearoftheMother, # ShareTheMicNow, Mothers Monday, State of Black Mothers in America, and Black Maternal Health Week.

Finally, with childcare being one of the main catalysts for the decline in maternal health, Christine is also aligned with the WHO health theme: quality of child care. Christine has also supported Senator Kamala Harris, the Congressional Caucus on Black Women & Girls, the FamTech Collaborative, the United States Department of Labor and the United States Chamber of Commerce on issues related to maternal and child care. She is the founder of Mompreneur and Me, the first free professional development event for mom and me in the country. The conference co-hosted by Christine, The State of Black Mothers in America, is the world’s largest conference for black mothers.

Christine is also an angel investor for Myavana and Cradlewise, two tech companies founded by Moms of Color. Her favorite charity is the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland. Girl Scouts is an organization that builds girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place. Girls are prepared for a life of leadership regardless of whether they choose to become mothers.

Learn more about Christine Michel Carter here: christinemichelcarter.com



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Reinforce Work-Life Harmony with New Tripartite Standard, Singapore News & Top Stories https://work-fromhomee.com/reinforce-work-life-harmony-with-new-tripartite-standard-singapore-news-top-stories/ https://work-fromhomee.com/reinforce-work-life-harmony-with-new-tripartite-standard-singapore-news-top-stories/#respond Mon, 26 Apr 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/reinforce-work-life-harmony-with-new-tripartite-standard-singapore-news-top-stories/ A new tripartite standard was launched yesterday, with several recommendations to boost work-life harmony. Employers were urged to put in place programs to support their workers, from family days and subsidized medical examinations to staff recreation areas, to further promote work-life balance At work. Arrangements tailored to people with caring responsibilities, such as allowing them […]]]>


A new tripartite standard was launched yesterday, with several recommendations to boost work-life harmony.

Employers were urged to put in place programs to support their workers, from family days and subsidized medical examinations to staff recreation areas, to further promote work-life balance At work.

Arrangements tailored to people with caring responsibilities, such as allowing them to work remotely, offering them extra time off or staggered hours to start and finish work, were also encouraged.

The Tripartite Work-Life Harmony Standard was developed by the Department of Manpower, the National Trade Union Congress and the Singapore National Employers’ Federation (SNEF), in response to recommendations from the Panel of citizens on the harmony between work and private life.

As part of the wider Singapore Together movement launched by the Fourth Generation Leadership Team in June 2019 to engage citizens more broadly in policymaking, the Citizen Panel deliberated on issues such as flexible working arrangements and proposed ways to strengthen work-life harmony, including a more supportive work culture. The panel included employers, workers, housewives and retirees.

Minister of State for Manpower, Gan Siow Huang, said yesterday that there is a need to consider how employers and their workers could be better supported on the front of work-to-work harmony. personal life.

“In this new normal, Singaporeans are increasingly accustomed to hybrid work, but are also increasingly concerned about blurring the lines between work and private life, and hope to better juggle work and personal commitments. “, she noted.

Ms. Gan recognized the varied needs of employees and employers across roles and life stages.

The tripartite standard suggested other employment practices, including having companies establish and communicate their work-life harmony policies to meet the mental health needs of workers and prevent burnout.

They were encouraged to appoint a member of senior management to champion work-life balance, provide employees with enhanced leave benefits, such as extended childcare leave, and review the effectiveness of their work-life programs through regular surveys or focus groups.

Employers were also urged to adopt the previous Tripartite Standard on Flexible Working Arrangements, launched in 2017 to get them to offer more flexible working options, such as choosing when to start and when to end work.

  • Recommendations

  • The Tripartite Work-Life Harmony Standard encourages employers to:

    • Adopt the tripartite standard on flexible working arrangements.

    • Establish employee support programs such as family days, subsidized medical examinations and recreation areas for staff, and use technological tools to support these programs.

    • Implement enhanced leave policies for all employees by providing at least two enhanced leave benefits, communicating them and encouraging use.

    • Appoint a member of senior management to champion work-life harmony.

    • Discuss appropriate arrangements for employees with caregiving responsibilities.

    • Establish and share the company’s work-life harmony policy with workers to support their mental well-being, prevent burnout and increase productivity.

    • Regularly review the effectiveness of work-life programs.

    Calvin yang

The Civil Service Division would study recommended employment practices “with a view to their adoption by public sector agencies,” the tripartite partners said in a joint statement.

To help companies take the first step towards adopting the new standard, the Tripartite Alliance for Fair and Progressive Employment Practices will organize clinics and workshops.

SNEF board member Bicky Bhangu noted that nearly four in five employers, or 78%, had implemented at least one formal type of flexible working arrangement last year, up from around half, or 53%. , in 2019. need to maintain safe operations during the pandemic.

The launch of the tripartite standard was timely, he said.

“The key is for the standards to be flexible enough for employers to implement work and life practices that take into account the varying needs and well-being of employees. Doing this can help improve employee engagement and productivity.



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Fall 2021 Campus Planning Update from Chancellor and Rector https://work-fromhomee.com/fall-2021-campus-planning-update-from-chancellor-and-rector/ https://work-fromhomee.com/fall-2021-campus-planning-update-from-chancellor-and-rector/#respond Mon, 26 Apr 2021 20:57:56 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/fall-2021-campus-planning-update-from-chancellor-and-rector/ Circumstances related to the COVID-19 pandemic continue to improve in the community of Davis and are expected to improve in Sacramento. Even as more people are vaccinated and infection rates decline, we must remain vigilant with asymptomatic testing, symptom screening, wearing masks, hand washing, physical distancing and our others. Ready for campus Activities. As a […]]]>


Circumstances related to the COVID-19 pandemic continue to improve in the community of Davis and are expected to improve in Sacramento. Even as more people are vaccinated and infection rates decline, we must remain vigilant with asymptomatic testing, symptom screening, wearing masks, hand washing, physical distancing and our others. Ready for campus Activities. As a result of these efforts and changes in public health direction, we plan to resume in-person activities at our Davis and Sacramento campuses for the fall term of 2021. Of course, we will continue to monitor conditions. local and regional, as well as public health advice. , and will have contingency plans in place if necessary to adapt to changing circumstances. In the meantime, and to help you plan for the fall term, we’ve developed the following draft guidelines for fall 2021:

Instruction

Based on public health guidelines and UC President’s Office, we expect teaching to be done in person with normal classroom occupancy. Students, faculty and TAs should expect to participate largely or only in face-to-face instruction.

Registration for permanent students begins in May. To ensure that we have enough space for all offerings, we will place all classes (e.g. lectures, discussions, studio, performances) in a classroom. Laboratory teaching will take place in teaching laboratories at full capacity.

We recognize that some courses may need to change their teaching methods to support students affected by travel and visa restrictions and to meet specific faculty needs. We are working with the Academic Senate to establish a process for reviewing and approving such changes, with the aim of providing more detailed information on the process in May. Our goal is to allow academic departments to submit such adjustments from July 1, 2021 – an inflection point that is late enough to ensure that we have information supported by data on public health conditions, but sufficiently early to allow flexibility to adjust academic plans.

International students

We are closely monitoring the situation at US embassies and consulates abroad and continue to advocate through various channels on behalf of our international community. We know that an inability to obtain a visa and other travel restrictions may prevent some students from being on campus in the fall, so we will do our best to put in place alternative education options. In some cases, students may need to adjust their academic plans in consultation with their academic advisor. We also call on departments and faculty to help ensure that international students are not disproportionately affected by situations beyond their control. From now on, we expect that all international students will be able to arrive in person for the winter term, and thus anticipate that winter courses will be delivered the same way they were before the pandemic. . We will continue to monitor the ability of international students to arrive by the winter term and examine to what extent additional distance course offerings may be required in the winter.

Students or instructors in need of ADA health care or accommodations

Students with disabilities who wish to request an academic adjustment related to COVID-19 are encouraged to contact the Student Disability Center early to discuss accommodations. Please consult the Center for disabled students for more information on the accommodation request process.

We are finalizing new application and review processes for faculty and staff requiring ADA health care or accommodation related to COVID-19 and will notify the campus next month when the forms are available for submission. Once ready, this information will be published on the Disability management services website.

Reinventing the post-pandemic workplace for staff

Staff working remotely will hear more in a future communication on plans for summer and fall. In March 2020, the university turned to remote work as a mandate for many employees and it has proven to be a viable and efficient way to provide some of our services. It also has the potential to save money, free up space, and improve employee satisfaction. We are currently reviewing the lessons we have learned over the past year and will soon release recommendations and guidelines for supervisors, managers and line staff that maximize the benefits of flexible working arrangements for staff. without sacrificing the delivery of essential services. Learn more about the Workplace Reimagined Workgroup here.

Continuing to ramp up research

The research firm continued to expand its activities as circumstances improved. We expect to be able to continue expanding activities over the summer and expect to reach phase 4 by the fall, returning to full research activities in September. Details of each phase can be found in the Guidelines for the rise of UC Davis research.

Student accommodation and catering

Since we expect teaching to be in-person, we encourage all students to find accommodation in the Davis or Sacramento area for the 2021-2022 academic year as soon as possible, if you haven’t. already done.

We expect housing and restaurants on campus to operate at full capacity. We also plan to continue to have COVID-19 quarantine and isolation facilities available on campus for the fall term. More information is available at: https://housing.ucdavis.edu/.

Vaccines

COVID-19 vaccines are our best defense against the virus. Given the importance of vaccination, the University of California has proposed a compulsory vaccination policy so that everyone has enough time to be vaccinated before the fall term.

Under the proposed policy, the university would require that students, faculty, academics and staff who access campus facilities at any location in UC starting this fall be immune to SARS- CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. This vaccination requirement would come into effect once a vaccine has received full approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration. UC already strongly encourages students, faculty, academics, and staff to get vaccinated voluntarily as soon as they are able to make an appointment.

Students planning to access UC campuses for the fall will need to update their vaccination documentation on file to indicate vaccination or an approved exception or medical exemption before coming to campus. For those who cannot receive a vaccine before arriving on campus, student health centers may be able to find a local resource for immunization, but special protections may be needed. Faculty, academics and staff will be briefed on the process for reporting immunization information once the policy is finalized.

Campus facilities and events

We plan to have academic support spaces (ie Libraries, Computer Labs, Student Centers, etc.) open in the fall and operating at normal capacity, as per our teaching plan.

We also expect a return to the organization of in-person events and the ability for student groups and campus departments to use campus facilities. We will be providing more advice on booking campus space for internal and external events in the coming months. For current guidelines on events and gatherings, please see the tips on Campus Ready here.

In closing

We hope this has answered many of your questions, but we also recognize that we haven’t provided as much detail as you would like. Please know that we continue to refine every aspect of our campus activities for this fall, and we will continue to keep you informed through multiple communication modalities, including Ready for campus website. If you would like the Fall Planning Working Group to consider specific questions or issues, please enter them at the following portal: https://campusready.ucdavis.edu/fall2021

Thank you all for your commitment to ensuring UC Davis meets our mission and vision of providing excellent education for our students, innovative research opportunities for our faculty, and a welcoming environment for all to thrive.

All my wishes,

Mary croughan
Provost and Executive Vice-Chancellor



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Leaving Lockdown: Considerations for Employers – Part 1: The Future of Work https://work-fromhomee.com/leaving-lockdown-considerations-for-employers-part-1-the-future-of-work/ https://work-fromhomee.com/leaving-lockdown-considerations-for-employers-part-1-the-future-of-work/#respond Mon, 26 Apr 2021 18:46:42 +0000 https://work-fromhomee.com/leaving-lockdown-considerations-for-employers-part-1-the-future-of-work/ “The end of 9 to 5?” “Goodbye the long drive?” “Hello homework?” As we exit the lockdown and look to the future of work, now is the time for employers to reflect on how they will shape their organization’s work culture and practices, and to what extent they will retain remote or flexible work practices […]]]>


“The end of 9 to 5?” “Goodbye the long drive?” “Hello homework?”

As we exit the lockdown and look to the future of work, now is the time for employers to reflect on how they will shape their organization’s work culture and practices, and to what extent they will retain remote or flexible work practices and forgo expensive offices. .

We are already seeing that there is no “one size fits all” approach. Amazon and Goldman Sachs are returning to a “desktop-centric culture”, unlike JP Morgan’s plans to continue remote working and Spotify’s “Working from Anywhere” policies, which will give employees the choice to work full-time ever since. home or office or a combination of the two and with more flexibility in their geographic location.

In the first part of our “Exit lock“We are examining employer options in light of key legal and practical considerations.

Key battlefields

There are many competing interests that an organization must take into account when planning ahead; savings on real estate, employee well-being and morale, the need for employee supervision and support (especially for junior team members) and, most importantly, what the competitors are doing. In the post-COVID world, employees will take flexibility for granted, and the need to achieve it will become an even more valuable recruitment and retention tool.

One of the main battlegrounds will inevitably be the employer’s preference to return to an office culture over shrinking real estate footprint, as HSBC and Lloyds Banking Group have confirmed their intention to reduce office space. by 40% and 20% respectively over the next few years.

In making these decisions, employers should understand the labor law framework in which their businesses operate, which includes the following FAQs.

Do employees have the legal right to work remotely?

In short, no, unless a contractual right is offered under an employee’s terms of employment.

While employees do not have the right to work remotely or flexibly, if they have at least 26 weeks of continuous service, they do have the statutory right to apply for flexible work (once every 12 months). ) which may include changes in working hours, where they work from and when their work is completed.

Employers are required to carefully consider each request for flexible work and can only refuse if the reason falls within one or more of the eight business reasons provided for by law. These business reasons are very broad. The reasons include: the burden of additional costs; an inability to reorganize the work of existing staff; a negative impact on performance or quality of work; inability to meet customer demand; inability to recruit additional staff; lack of work to be done during the proposed working hours; or planned business changes.

Since many people have indeed adapted to remote working, it will inevitably be more difficult to justify refusing flexible work requests in their entirety unless there are particular issues or inefficiencies, and refusals may. have a negative impact on employee morale. Employers have three months to complete the process from start to finish.

Any abusive denial can lead to claims for up to eight weeks’ salary, currently capped at 544 per week or, more often and more worryingly, possible discrimination claims (depending on the circumstances) that are not capped.

What should employers do to prepare for an increase in flexible work demands?

To prepare for the expected surge in flexible work demands, employers should ensure that they have a strong flexible work policy and a work from home policy in place. This can mean implementing new policies where none previously existed, or revising current policies to ensure they are up to date and complete. Work from home policies should aim to ensure that employees are clear about working from home and should set expectations and guidelines to ensure work efficiency, supervision and protection of confidential information and data.

Can an employer require employees to work primarily or entirely from home?

Some employers want to take advantage of working from home, but can they make it a requirement for their employees?

To answer this, employers will need to look at the conditions set out in an employee’s employment contract, in particular a “place of work” clause. If the terms of the employment contract provide for the person to work in an office, this could constitute a contract amendment to require that they become primarily or entirely home based. As always, contract changes require employee consent and legal advice should be taken before changing contract terms, especially if it affects a large number of employees, as collective consultation obligations may be triggered.

It will be important for an employer to consider any changes over the past year (i.e. working from home) and whether these were or are express or implied changes to the employment contract, and carried out on a temporary or permanent basis. Many of the changes were made overnight given the nature of the pandemic and without the documentation or processes that would usually accompany these changes. Employers should review current arrangements and communications to take stock of their current position and help them plan effectively for their future.

What are the key issues with working from home?

If employers want to continue working from home, they need to make sure that they have thought through a number of associated issues that may arise, some of which are highlighted below.

  • Data protection and confidentialityy – how can employers ensure that confidential and sensitive data is handled appropriately, secure and protected?
  • Salary weighting – how do employers approach issues of salary levels (eg would employers still apply a pay raise in London if the employee moves from London and works remotely)?
  • Employee well-being – some people struggle with a sense of isolation and their mental health is affected by the lack of face to face interaction that permanent home working brings. How should employers handle this?
  • Health and safety obligations – an employer’s health and safety obligations extend to those who work from home. Have the relevant job postings been carried out?
  • Performance and development – working remotely can make it difficult for employers to identify problems or to accurately assess the performance of their teams. Employers should spend time planning how they manage performance and development remotely (check out our upcoming podcast on this topic).
  • Insurance – have employers checked that their employers’ liability insurance covers the activities of homeworkers?
  • Expenses, fees and allowances – what costs incurred by working at home should be borne by the employer? Do employees know which expenses are tax deductible?

Employers should be aware that working remotely from abroad raises a myriad of additional issues to consider (e.g. taxation, local employment rights). We’ll cover this topic in a future podcast, so look for this landing in your inbox.



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